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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Youth Development 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
57427  National Certificate: Youth Development 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Development 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
ETDP SETA - Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 05 - Education, Training and Development  Adult Learning 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  155  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The purpose of the Qualification is for qualified learners to be able to facilitate enabling processes for youth development. Working in the youth development field enables young people to participate in society and the economy. Youth development work is a proactive social mechanism for managing change in the economy and society. The impact of youth development work on young people is significant, and the qualification ensures that youth development work is an empowering mechanism for the redress of past unfair discrimination in education, training and employment opportunities for both youth development workers and their target groups (marginalised young people).

The registration of this Qualification places youth development workers in a position to access learning at Higher Education level after achieving a Further Education and Training Certificate: Youth Development at NQF Level 4. The Qualification is set to improve their access not only to Higher Education, but also to career progression. Through articulation, the Qualification also ensures that qualified learners can transfer credits to other areas of learning. Setting a minimum standard for qualification, the status of the profession is enhanced, and the quality of education and training is ensured.

Qualified learners are capable of:
  • Collecting, collating and analysing information and evaluate implications of findings for youth development.
  • Advocating and lobbying for enabling environments to promote youth development.
  • Building relationships with stakeholders to promote youth development.
  • Coordinating youth development activities to meet identified needs.
  • Managing youth development projects to meet the needs of youth within specific community contexts.
  • Aligning own youth development practice within specified quality frameworks.

    Rationale:

    The youth development sector requires this Qualification to ensure that qualified learners are able to facilitate enabling processes for youth development. The Qualification is set to provide much needed recognition for youth development workers, and to ensure that youth development work is recognised as a profession.

    This Qualification is aimed at youth development workers. Learners are often already employed or are working as community volunteers in the youth development sector, but do not have relevant qualifications. This Qualification will provide learners with recognition of prior learning and access to further learning. Achieving this Qualification can improve qualified learners' earning capability. Learners generally attempt this Qualification after completion of schooling (post matric), from other professions (e.g. health workers, social workers, etc.) or after completion of a relevant NQF Level 4 Qualification, such as the Further Education and Training Certificate: Youth Development.

    Qualified learners can progress to Qualifications at NQF Level 6, such as Bachelors degrees in the Education Training and Development field. Articulation with other Qualifications also allows qualified learners to access additional Qualifications at NQF Level 5 in other fields. The learning pathway commences at NQF Level 1 where important life skills are achieved, through to NQF Level 8, where a contribution to youth development practice is required.

    Qualified learners can be employed as youth workers, or practitioners involved in development work with young people. Employers of qualified learners include government departments, for example, Department of Correctional Services, the Department of Social Development (especially at provincial level), the Department of Health, the Department of Provincial and Local Government, and the Department of Education. Other employers are the Youth Commission, SAYWA, and various youth development Non-Government Organisations (NGOs), Faith-Based Organisations (FBOs) and Church-based Organisations (CBOs). Some qualified learners will also work in academic institution outreach programmes.

    The impact of the Qualification on society and the economy is significant. Qualified learners achieve greater economic participation as youth development workers. Through recognition of the profession, the status of youth development work is raised, creating more employment opportunities. Qualified learners work with marginalised youth groups, such as:
  • Out of school youth.
  • Asylum seekers.
  • Orphaned and vulnerable young people.
  • At-risk young people.
  • Young parents.
  • Youth in conflict with the law.

    These groups are provided with the necessary competence to participate fully in the South African society and economy. The qualification also requires research and information management competence, which ensures improved access to information in the youth development field and for communities and young people. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    The qualification was designed based on the assumption that the following competencies have already been achieved:
  • Communication and language at NQF Level 4.
  • Youth development practice at NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of prior learning:

    This qualification can be achieved wholly, or in part, through recognition of prior learning. Evidence can be presented in a variety of forms, including previous international or local qualifications, reports, testimonials, mentoring, functions performed, portfolios, work records and performance records. As such, evidence should be judged according to the general principles of assessment described in the notes to assessors below. Learners who have met the requirements of any Unit Standard that forms part of this qualification may apply for recognition of prior learning to the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance body (ETQA). The applicant must be assessed against the specific outcomes and with the assessment criteria for the relevant Unit Standards. A qualification will be awarded should a learner demonstrate that the exit level outcomes of the qualification have been attained.

    Access to the qualification:

    Access to the qualification is open. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The Fundamental component (7 credits) and the Core component (138 credits) are compulsory. Learners are also required to achieve at least 10 credits against unit standards in the Elective component. 

    EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Collect, collate and analyse information and evaluate implications of findings for youth development.
  • Range: types of information include factors that influence youth development work and instruments used, youth development practices, need of youth, existing programmes, comparing to international practice, etc.
    2. Advocate and lobby for enabling environments to promote youth development.
  • Range: advocacy should include issues affecting youth, social equity, etc.
    3. Build relationships with stakeholders to promote youth development.
  • Range: Building relationships includes promoting and advocating relationships, networking, marketing, strategic alliances, etc.
    4. Coordinate youth development activities to meet identified needs.
    5. Manage youth development projects to meet the needs of youth within specific community contexts.
    6. Align own youth development practice within specified quality frameworks. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    1.
  • Information collected is relevant for and suitable to promote youth development activities.
  • Categorised and cross referenced data provide input into youth project design.
  • Instruments selected are appropriate for the purpose of specific, selected youth projects.
  • Selected evaluation criteria and evaluation take into account the implications for youth development activities.

    2.
  • Key, priority issues that affect youth are identified for the purpose of advocacy and lobbying activities.
  • Relevant advocacy and lobbying strategies are selected for engaging with identified issues.
  • Specific indicators are identified and pursued for an enabling environment and are issue-based.

    3.
  • Stakeholders identified and described are appropriate for youth development within specific contexts.
  • Selected and implemented strategies of engagement are justified in terms of achieving specific objectives.
  • An ongoing information and communication system is designed and adhered to in accordance with project plans/design.

    4.
  • Implementation strategies, tools, techniques and methods are appropriate for and consistent with specific activities and context requirements.
  • Implementation adheres to given plans, and proposed changes are agreed with relevant persons.
  • Selected resources are sufficient for and meet the requirements of given plans.
  • Success indicators are developed in line with given objectives.

    5.
  • Youth development projects are described in accordance with specific community contexts.
  • Youth development projects are managed in accordance with intended outcomes of the projects and agreed management practices within the context of youth development.
  • Management of project teams is in line with agreed current practices within the context of specific teams.

    6.
  • Descriptors of quality frameworks are described for specific contexts.
  • Youth development practices are consistent with specified quality frameworks.
  • Quality indicators that endorse youth development practice are described for specific contexts.

    Integrated assessment:

    The assessment criteria in the unit standards are performance-based, assessing applied competence, rather than only underpinning knowledge, or only skills. The critical cross-field outcomes are also achieved in the unit standards. In addition to the competence assessed to achieve the unit standards, learners must demonstrate that they can achieve the outcomes in an integrated manner, dealing effectively with different and random demands related to occupational and learning contexts, to qualify, and assessment approaches used should be appropriate for assessing applied competence. Integrated assessment is meaningful if there are clear relationships between the purpose statement, exit level outcomes and integrated assessment of this qualification.

    Learners who qualify must be able to integrate concepts, ideas and behaviours across unit standards to achieve the purpose of the qualification. Evidence (as specified in the associated assessment criteria) is required that the learner is able to achieve the exit level outcomes of the qualification as a whole and in an integrated way, and thus its purpose, at the time of the award of the qualification.

    Evidence of integration may be presented by learners when being assessed against the unit standards, and separate assessment for integration may not be necessary. Workplace experience can be recognised when assessing towards this qualification. Integrated assessment should include observable performance as well as the quality of thinking behind such performance. Formative assessment can be employed during learning towards the unit standards and during integration to achieve exit level outcomes, to ensure that integration takes place when summative assessment is employed. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The majority of youth development work internationally takes place in Africa, Asia, Central America and the Caribbean, the South Pacific and South America. Other countries involved in youth development work in these regions include the United States of America, United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and China. Norway, Denmark and Finland have a Vocational Qualification in Youth and Leisure Instruction, but no information regarding this qualification was available. Other countries for which no information was available (in English) were Germany, Japan and China.

    International qualifications employ mainly two approaches, namely, programmes that include sociology and psychology subjects, and those that do not. The former programmes are generally longer (2 years) than the latter, and this South African qualification is comparable with the latter. Therefore, comparisons are limited to those qualification programmes that are of equal notional hours (approximately 1200 notional hours) and at an equivalent level of complexity.

    The Commonwealth Youth Programme (CYP) is an international development agency based in the United Kingdom and dedicated to empowering young people aged 15 to 29. The CYP has developed a Diploma in Youth Development Work that is available in more than 40 Commonwealth countries, including South Africa, via its regional centres in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the South Pacific.

    The countries that implement the Diploma in Youth Development Work are:
  • In Africa: Botswana, Cameroon, Cyprus, Ghana, The Gambia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Malta, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, United Kingdom and Zambia.
  • In Asia: Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Maldives, Sri Lanka, and Singapore.
  • In the Caribbean: Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago, and Turks & Caicos Islands.
  • In the South Pacific: Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji Islands, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand/Aotearoa, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, and Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

    The CYP qualification, considered the equivalent of the first year of a university degree programme (and the equivalent of this NQF Level 5 Certificate), consists of fourteen modules. It compares as follows with this qualification:

    CYP Diploma in Youth Development Work
  • Commonwealth Values in Youth Development, SA Qualification: Integrated (generic)
  • Young People and society, SA Qualification: Core
  • Principles and Practice of Youth Development Work: SA Qualification: Core
  • Working with People in their Communities, SA Qualification: Core and Elective
  • Gender and Development, SA Qualification: Elective
  • Learning Processes, SA Qualification: Core
  • Management Skills, SA Qualification Core and Elective
  • Project Planning, SA Qualification Monitoring and Evaluation: Core
  • Policy Planning and Implementation, SA Qualification: Partially, Core
  • Conflict Resolution Strategies and Skills, SA Qualification: Core
  • Promoting Enterprise and Economic Development, SA Qualification: Core and Elective
  • Youth and Health, SA Qualification: Integrated
  • Sustainable Development and Environmental Issues, SA Qualification: Integrated
  • Area specific issues (e.g. Pacific), SA Qualification: Integrated

    The CYP Diploma programme is provided in all the above countries, for example, in Botswana as an 18 month distance learning programme, and in Australia as a 1-year full time diploma. Applied in the Australian context the Diploma is structured as follows, compared with this South African qualification:

    Australian Diploma of Youth Work

    Core
  • Support for the interests, rights and needs of clients within duty of care requirements, SA Qualification: Core
  • Identify and respond to children and young people at risk of harm, SA Qualification: Core
  • Develop, implement and promote effective communication techniques, SA Qualification: Fundamental
  • Co-ordinate the provision of services and programs, SA Qualification: Core
  • Respond holistically to client issues, SA Qualification: Core
  • Plan and conduct group activities, SA Qualification: Core
  • Work with other services, SA Qualification: Core
  • Implement and monitor OHS policies and procedures for a workplace, SA Qualification: Core (generic)
  • Support youth programs, SA Qualification: Core
  • Provide appropriate services for young people, SA Qualification: Core
  • Manage service response to young people in crisis, SA Qualification: Core

    Electives (2 required)
  • Assess the needs of clients who have alcohol and/or other drugs issues:SA Qualification: Not included
  • Establish and monitor a case plan:SA Qualification: Not included
  • Develop, facilitate and monitor all aspects of case management:SA Qualification: Not included
  • Work effectively with culturally diverse clients and co-workers:SA Qualification: Not included
  • ,Assess and respond to individuals at risk of self-harm or suicide:SA Qualification: Not included
  • Design and supervise family intervention strategies:SA Qualification: Not included
  • Counsel clients affected by domestic and family violence:SA Qualification: Not included
  • Orientation to mental health work:SA Qualification: Not included

    The main difference between Diplomas in the various countries lies in the elective component. For example, in Botswana, no elective component is required, and in Australia, the elective component focuses on a medical approach to youth work, as opposed to the more holistic approach of this South African qualification.

    According to a recent report regarding youth development work training in the European Union (Training and Education of Youth Workers in Europe, A snapshot - October 2005, by Louise Atkin, Karin Douglas and Maggie Farrell), programmes are mostly taught by universities, at diploma or degree level in Austria, Denmark, England, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Malta, Northern Ireland, Netherlands, Scotland, Wales and the Republic of Ireland, with France being the only country where training spans five different levels, mostly offered by NGOs. Countries that do not have specific youth work qualifications include Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Poland, Slovenia and Switzerland. These countries employ youth workers with other related qualifications, mostly degrees, such as social pedagogy, social work and cultural animation. The Council of Europe and the European Commission recommend the following modules be included in youth work training programmes, in comparison with this South African qualification:

    Council of Europe/European Commission Youth Work Courses
  • Organisational management, SA Qualification: Partially, Core and Elective
  • Methodology in language learning, SA Qualification: Core (generic)
  • Project management, SA Qualification: Core, Elective
  • Intercultural learning, SA Qualification: Core
  • International voluntary service, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Training essentials, SA Qualification: Core
  • Citizenship, youth and Europe, SA Qualification: Core (generic)
  • Social inclusion, SA Qualification: Core
  • Funding and financial management, SA Qualification: Core and Elective

    In the above report, a case study is presented for Malta. At the University of Malta an equivalent qualification is offered, namely, a Certificate in Youth Studies. The programme includes modules that compare with the core of the South African qualification: principles of youth work practice, skills training, thematic studies, fieldwork placement and personal logbook, foundation studies, and critical issues.

    Short course examples in the United Kingdom at a level that is equivalent to this qualification include courses offered by the YMCA, Havering Youth Support Services, and other not-for-profit organisations, that compare as follows with the South African qualification's unit standards:

    United Kingdom short courses
  • Recruitment, SA Qualification: Elective
  • Facilitating training, SA Qualification: Core
  • Legislation, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Coaching, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Personal development planning and growth, SA Qualification: Core
  • Labour law, SA Qualification: Elective (integrated)
  • Managing diversity, SA Qualification: Core
  • Managing effective meetings, SA Qualification: Partially, Elective
  • Presentation skills, SA Qualification: Core
  • Project management, SA Qualification: Core
  • Reviewing work, SA Qualification: Core
  • Time management, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Working with conflict/Conflict resolution, SA Qualification: Core and Elective
  • Working with groups, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • The role of the youth worker, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Managing money, SA Qualification: Core and Elective
  • Problems and dilemmas which young people encounter, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Personal and social opportunities, SA Qualification: Fundamental
  • Information, support and counselling Partially, SA Qualification: Core
  • Technology and I.T, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Project/event planning, SA Qualification: Core
  • Democratic involvement, SA Qualification: Core
  • Sport, outdoor and physical activity, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Inclusion programmes, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Cultural activities, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Techniques for youth work (e.g. group work, mediation, negotiation, mentoring, etc.), SA Qualification: Core (integrated)

    In Canada, youth development worker training includes project management, entrepreneurial and leadership skills, employment skills facilitation, community work, work placement, supervision and mentoring, facilitating job search skills, labour law, remuneration strategies, and youth programme coordination. Qualifications are mostly at post graduate level.

    In the United States of America, two certificates are available for youth workers, one of which is at a lower level, and one at the equivalent level of this South African qualification. Other youth development practice qualifications are at first degree level and higher. The equivalent qualifications typically include field experience in a social service, mental health, juvenile treatment, community based or other community service agencies. Qualification programmes compare as follows with this South African qualification:

    Youth Work/Youth Development Certificate:
  • Introduction to human services, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Strategies useful in learning to work with different client populations, SA Qualification: Core
  • Interpersonal skills to establish relationships, SA Qualification: Core
  • Principles of youth work, SA Qualification: Core
  • The theory and practice of youth development, SA Qualification: Core
  • Computers and information technology, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Composition (writing) and reading, SA Qualification: Learning assumed to be in place
  • Communication: listening and speaking, SA Qualification: Learning assumed to be in place
  • Introduction to American national politics, SA Qualification: Elective (generic)
  • General psychology, SA Qualification: Partially, Core (integrated)
  • Adolescent psychology, SA Qualification: Partially, Core (integrated)
  • Sociology, SA Qualification: Partially, Core (integrated)
  • Public speaking, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Resolving conflict, SA Qualification: Core
  • Diversity and multicultural communities, SA Qualification: Core
  • Working with youth in small groupsm, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Understanding the role of gender in youth development, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Field trips as learning opportunities for youth, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Engaging multiple learning styles, SA Qualification: Core
  • Program design for youth development, SA Qualification: Partially, Core
  • Project-based learning, SA Qualification: Core
  • Supervising youth development practice, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Self awareness and expression, SA Qualification: Core
  • Youth cultural competency, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Increasing parent involvement, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Youth engagement, participation and empowerment, SA Qualification: Core

    Various short courses are also offered that address parts of the qualifications, for example, the Indiana Youth Development (IYD) Credential, Virginia State University, and the Transformation Institutes of The YouthBuild Academy. Notional hours range between 60 and 700 hours.

    The equivalent level New Zealand qualification is longer than the South African qualification, but credits are spread across six levels of their framework. Equivalent level notional hours are similar, and compares as follows with the South African qualification:

    Diploma in Youth Work (equivalent level unit standards only):

    Core
  • Facilitate development of social service liaison and networking in the community, SA Qualification: Core
  • Facilitate economic development in social service work, SA Qualification: Core
  • Manage volunteer social service workers, SA Qualification: Core
  • Demonstrate self awareness for social service work, SA Qualification: Core
  • Implement Te Tiriti o Waitangi in the social services, SA Qualification: Not included
  • Act as an advocate in social service work, SA Qualification: Core
  • Analyse youth issues in the community for youth work purposes, SA Qualification: Core
  • Facilitate youth empowerment in youth work, SA Qualification: Core
  • Manage the establishment or development of a new youth work project or service, SA Qualification: Core
  • Demonstrate an integrated practice theory for youth work, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)

    Elective (1 required)
  • Facilitate strategies to effect community or social change, SA Qualification: Core
  • Facilitate strategies to effect change in social policies, structures, or service delivery, SA Qualification: Core
  • Facilitate strategies to respond to crisis situations in the community, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)

    Elective (balance of qualification credits)
  • Field: Business, SA Qualification: Elective
  • Field: Community and Social Services, SA Qualification: Core and Elective
  • Field: Education, SA Qualification: Core
  • Field: Health, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Field: Humanities, SA Qualification: Core (integrated)
  • Field: Maori, SA Qualification: Not included

    The countries discussed above also train youth development workers in Israel, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, Senegal, Sudan, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Brazil and Costa Rica.

    The South African qualification is comparable with international qualifications of equal notional hours. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    Vertical articulation is possible with the following NQF Level 6 qualifications:
  • Bachelor of Arts, National First Degree: Occupationally Directed Education, Training and Development Practices, ID 48871.

    Horizontal articulation on the NQF is possible with the following NQF Level 5 qualifications:
  • Higher Education and Training Certificate: Development Practice, ID 23095.
  • National Diploma: Development Practice, ID 49710.
  • National Certificate: Management, ID 1093.
  • Higher Certificate: Occupationally Directed Education Training and Development Practices, ID 48873.
  • National Diploma: Occupationally Directed Education, Training and Development Practices, ID 48869.
  • National Certificate: Conflict Management and Transformation, ID 49257. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Moderation of assessment and accreditation of providers shall be at the discretion of a relevant ETQA as long as it complies with the SAQA requirements. The ETQA is responsible for moderation of learner achievements of learners who meet the requirements of this qualification. Particular moderation and accreditation requirements are:
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA. Providers offering learning towards achievement of any of the unit standards that make up this qualification must also be accredited through the relevant ETQA accredited by SAQA.
  • The ETQA will oversee assessment and moderation of assessment according to their policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation, or in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between the relevant ETQA and other ETQAs and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed here.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments for the qualification, unless the relevant ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described in Unit Standards as well as the integrated competence described in the qualification.
  • Internal moderation of assessment must take place at the point of assessment with external moderation provided by a relevant ETQA according to the moderation guidelines and the agreed ETQA procedures.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessment of learner achievements takes place at providers accredited by the relevant ETQA (RSA, 1998b) for the provision of programs that result in the outcomes specified for this qualification. Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this qualification must be registered as an assessor with the ETQA. Assessors registered with the relevant ETQA must carry out the assessment of learners for the qualification and any of the Unit Standards that make up this qualification.

    To register as an assessor, the following are required:
  • Detailed documentary proof of relevant qualification/s, practical training completed, and/or experience gained in the relevant field at a NQF level above the level of this qualification.
  • Detailed documentary proof of relevant qualification/s, practical training completed, and/or experience gained in assessment at the appropriate NQF level (credit against the registered unit standard).

    Assessors should keep the following general principles in mind when designing and conducting assessments:
  • Focus the initial assessment activities on gathering evidence in terms of the main outcomes expressed in the titles of the Unit Standards to ensure assessment is integrated rather than fragmented. The learner must be declared competent in terms of the qualification purpose and exit level outcomes.
  • Where assessment across Unit Standard titles or at Unit Standard title level is unmanageable, then focus assessment around each specific outcome, or groups of specific outcomes. Take special note of the need for integrated assessment.
  • Make sure evidence is gathered across the entire range, wherever it applies.

    In particular, assessors should assess that the learner demonstrates an ability to consider a range of options by:
  • Measuring the quality of the observed practical performance as well as the theory and underpinning knowledge.
  • Using methods that are varied to allow the learner to display thinking and decision making in the demonstration of practical performance.
  • Maintaining a balance between practical performance and theoretical assessment methods to ensure each is measured in accordance with the level of the qualification.
  • Taking into account that the relationship between practical and theoretical components is not fixed, but varies according to the type and level of qualification.

    All assessments should be conducted in line with the following well-documented principles:
  • Appropriate: The method of assessment is suited to the performance being assessed.
  • Fair: The method of assessment does not present any barriers to achievements, which are not related to the evidence.
  • Manage: The methods used make for easily arranged cost-effective assessments that do not unduly interfere with learning.
  • Integrate into work or learning: Evidence collection is integrated into the work or learning process where this is appropriate and feasible.
  • Valid: The assessment focuses on the requirements laid down in the standards; i.e. the assessment is fit for purpose.
  • Direct: The activities in the assessment mirror the conditions of actual performance as close as possible.
  • Authentic: The assessor is satisfied that the work being assessed is attributable to the learner being assessed.
  • Sufficient: The evidence collected establishes that all criteria have been met and that performance to the required Standard can be repeated consistently.
  • Systematic: Planning and recording is sufficiently rigorous to ensure that assessment is fair.
  • Open: Learners can contribute to the planning and accumulation of evidence. Learners for assessment understand the assessment process and the criteria that apply.
  • Consistent: The same assessor would make the same judgement again in similar circumstances. The judgement made is similar than the judgement that would be made by other assessors. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  15237  Build teams to meet set goals and objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  230448  Contribute towards organisation policy development  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  119765  Define community-based development project scope  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  117855  Design and implement plans to deal with conflict situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  230445  Develop partnerships with youth development stakeholders  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  117871  Facilitate learning using a variety of given methodologies  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  115171  Generate resources for projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  15233  Harness diversity and build on strengths of a diverse working environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  230446  Manage quality of own youth development work  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  230442  Manage youth projects and development processes  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  230443  Market and promote youth development programmes  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  14020  Monitor budgets related to community projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  116787  Plan, monitor and control the financial resources for a small company or business unit  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  120378  Support the project environment and activities to deliver project objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  14 
    Core  117515  Tender for projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  230444  Advocate youth rights  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Fundamental  230441  Facilitate access to information that impacts on youth development  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  115821  Apply business financial practices  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  119664  Conduct an assessment of human rights and democracy practices in communities  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Elective  117853  Conduct negotiations to deal with conflict situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  119659  Examine law and structures in terms of their promotion of human rights and democracy  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  117854  Facilitate meetings to deal with conflict situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  12995  Maintain financial records and prepare general ledger accounts  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Elective  110482  Prepare a budget for a local economic development project and prepare the relevant financial reports  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  117844  Present, analyse and interpret information on conflict situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  12140  Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  117845  Restore and build relationships in dealing with conflict  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  116365  Evaluate the financial practices of a business  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



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