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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Landscaping 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
66649  National Certificate: Landscaping 
ORIGINATOR ORIGINATING PROVIDER
SGB Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape   
QUALITY ASSURING BODY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
AgriSETA - Agriculture SETA  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 01 - Agriculture and Nature Conservation  Horticulture 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  120  Level 3  NQF Level 03  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 0695/12  2012-07-01  2015-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2016-06-30   2019-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This qualification provides learners with a comprehensive base of portable skills that will enable them to progress within all spheres of the horticultural industry. This qualification forms an integral step in the career paths of the various disciplines in ornamental horticulture and follows on from the NQF Level 2 Certificate. For those already employed in the industry, this qualification will offer learners the opportunity to hone their skills and receive recognition for their competencies.

A Learner achieving this qualification will be able to work effectively and productively within the field of horticulture knowing how to:
  • Ensure health and safety standards in the horticultural industry.
  • Maintain practices of providing plant care and nutrition for ornamental plants and landscapes.
  • Shape trees and shrubs to promote flowering.
  • Ensure that alien invader plants are controlled.
  • Recognize a range of ornamental plants used in horticulture and care for plants that require special attention.
  • Ensure that grassed areas are maintained through the application of mowing and de-thatching practices.
  • Ensure that the irrigation systems installed in landscaped areas are properly maintained.
  • Supervise and maintain specific sportsturf areas.

    For those wishing to enter the industry, whether unemployed or as an Entrepreneur, this qualification offers a solid foundation in all aspects of the horticultural industry. This qualification represents a vital step in the development of a career and learning pathway of individuals, both from a vocational point of view, as well as from a learning point of view.

    Rationale:

    South Africa has the richest floral kingdom in the world and attracts thousands of visitors each year who enjoy the diversity of the flora in the different geographic regions. Numerous international horticultural conferences are held in South Africa. This confirms the importance of horticultural aspects in the daily lives of South Africans and the positive economic effect that the sales of horticultural products and services have being available to both the local and international markets.

    South Africa has a vibrant horticultural industry and numerous local events for the consumer, as well as the trade, are arranged. These range from talks on specific subjects to international conferences and exhibitions where South African experts are available to present papers and answer questions. These events also attract overseas horticultural experts, suppliers and gardening enthusiasts.

    In the context of the above, it is therefore vital that the South African workforce be up-skilled to become more knowledgeable, efficient and productive to ensure the "horticultural firmament" continues shining brightly and to grow the potential of designers, installers and growers in the various sectors of the horticultural industry.

    The skills gained through this qualification will ensure that, not only will quality ornamental plants be produced and marketed to consumers, but that the environment will be protected against the invasion of alien plants in natural areas as well as in commercial and residential gardens and recreation areas.

    The qualification will facilitate job creation and self employment opportunities, while furthering the aims of economic empowerment in South Africa.

    The qualification includes the skills necessary to monitor and maintain health and safety in the horticultural industry while addressing the nutritional needs of plants, controlling common pests in the horticultural environment, attending to the basic maintenance of grassed areas and shaping plants to promote flowering. In addition, the qualification provides the opportunity for the learner at level 3 to become conversant with the application of supervisory management principles in the industry.

    As the qualification is based on the common core of the preceding NQF Level 1 and 2 qualifications, it embodies the principle of portability and is integral to further learning, despite its focus being on the more specialised field of landscaping. Through the wide scope of electives, the specialisations of the various sectors are catered for.

    The sectors of the horticultural industry that will benefit from this qualification include:
  • Landscape construction and maintenance.
  • Amenity horticulture.
  • Sports turf.
  • Arboriculture.
  • Plant propagation.
  • Interior plantscaping.
  • Retail nurseries.

    This qualification addresses both the current and future needs of horticulture in South Africa. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    The industry will encourage potential Learners to embark on this qualification as it has universal relevance to the industry and is nationally recognized. Learners who would like to access this qualification should have demonstrated competency in:
  • Literacy and Numeracy at NQF Level 2.
  • ID 119687: Demonstrate a basic understanding of the horticultural industry.

    Learners should also preferably have completed the following unit standards prior to commencing with this qualification:
  • Provide care for ornamental plants at NQF Level 2.
  • Apply pest control practices in ornamental plant production and landscaping at NQF Level 2.
  • Prune and shape shrubs at NQF Level 2.
  • Provide nutrition to plants and landscapes at NQF Level 2.

    Recognition of Previous Learning:

    The qualification may be achieved wholly or in part through the Recognition of Prior Learning and the qualification may be granted to learners who have acquired the skills and knowledge without attending formal courses providing they can demonstrate competence in the outcomes of the individual Unit Standards as required by the Fundamental, core and Elective areas stipulated in the Qualification and by the Exit Level Outcomes.

    An RPL process may also be used to credit learners with Unit Standards in which they have developed the necessary competency as a result of workplace and experiential learning. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The certificate is made up of a planned combination of learning outcomes that have a defined purpose and will provide qualifying learners with applied competence and a foundation for further learning.

    The qualification consists of a minimum of 120 credits, composed of:
  • Fundamental; 36 credits (compulsory).
  • Core; 65 credits (compulsory).
  • Electives; Learners must choose suitable Unit Standards from the listed elective to obtain a total of at least 19 credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Distinguish the various internal structures of ornamental plants.

    2. Identify and correct nutrient deficiencies in ornamental plants.

    3. Identify and control the pests that commonly occur in the landscape environment.

    4. Perform the mowing and de-thatching of sportsturf or landscaped grass areas.

    5. Utilise the various pruning practices to encourage the flowering of ornamental plants. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 The different root types are identified with respect to their characteristic structures.
    1.2 The various functions that a stem performs is explained in terms of its supportive role and the translocation of water, carbohydrates and nutrients.
    1.3 The different structures and functions of a leaf are identified in terms of their role in the process of photosynthesis.
    1.4 The various components in a flower are described within the context of the functions that they perform in the reproductive processes.
    1.5 The different components in a flower are identified in terms of the functions that they perform.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 The factors that negatively affect the availability of nutrients for plants are described in relation to the pH levels in the soil.
    2.2 The macronutrients used by plants are described in terms of the contributions that each makes in ensuring healthy growth.
    2.3 The indications of one or more macronutrient deficiency in plants are described in terms of the particular signs that they exhibit.
    2.4 The nutrients that can be applied to the soil to compensate for a deficiency are described in relation to the particular compounds that contain the required nutrients.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 The benefits of implementing an integrated pest control program are described in terms of the use of varied cultural practices, not just the reliance on chemicals.
    3.2 The different cultural practices that comprise an integrated pest control program are identified with regard to the specific control strategy that they employ.
    3.3 A selection of pestilent insects that are commonly found in the landscape environment are identified within the context of the most effective suitable control to use.
    3.4 The procedures for the application of chemical controls are demonstrated in accordance with the health and safety practices.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:

    4.1 The turf care practices that must be implemented to maintain a quality cut are described in terms of the various settings and adjustments that are necessary.
    4.2 The conditions that dictate the need to de-thatch the grass are described in relation to the spongy build up of thatch.
    4.3 The process of scarifying a lawn or turfgrass is described in terms of the removal of all surface grass to encourage new growth.
    4.4 The upkeep that is necessary to ensure the continued quality of the turfgrass surface is described in terms of the preventative maintenance schedules that must be followed.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:

    5.1 The necessity of assessing the structure of a shrub before any branches are removed is explained with regards to the shape and form that will promote the optimum production of blooms.
    5.2 The particular methods of pruning plants that flower on the new season's growth are described in terms of the techniques to cut out internal cross growth and remove the "old" wood.
    5.3 The importance of correctly scheduling the pruning of plants that flower on the previous seasons wood is explained within the context of the essential need to prune immediately after flowering has ceased.
    5.4 The techniques for the pruning of climbing roses are described in terms of the manipulation of the branches to obtain the required density and blooms.
    5.5 The function and role of the feeding, weeding and pest control programs are explained and implemented to ensure that optimal plant growth is achieved.

    Integrated Assessment:

    The integrated assessment allows the Learners the opportunity to show that they are able to utilize concepts, ideas and actions across unit standards. This will allow learners to achieve competency that is in keeping with the purpose of the qualification.

    An integrated assessment will indicate how theoretical learning is demonstrated in a practical environment in such a way that the application of the work learnt becomes second nature.

    In conducting an assessment, the quality of the performance must also be evaluated i.e. both the performance and the thinking behind the action must be qualitative.

    The assessment should include both formative and summative options and should use various assessment tools i.e. not by observation only. It is suggested that a Portfolio of Assessment form part of the summative assessment, with practical outcomes being demonstrated in a simulated or real work place situation.

    A broad range of task-orientated and theoretical tools may be used, with the distinction between practical knowledge and disciplinary knowledge being maintained.

    Unit Standards in the qualification must be used to assess the specific and Critical Cross Field Outcomes. It is recommended that the assessment tools give Learners the opportunity to account for their decision-making and problem solving in line with the Specific Outcomes and related Assessment Criteria.

    As a result of this qualification being generic in forming the foundation for a career in horticulture, Learners should be assessed in occupational contexts and activities. The assessment should ensure that the foundational skills are portable and prepare them for further learning, whatever career path they may choose. 

    INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Over the last 50 years, South Africa has been an active member of the International Federation of Parks and Recreation Administration. Each year this body holds a congress in a different international city. These congresses serve to highlight the international best practices for the horticultural industry. Parks and gardens are showcased to exhibit the latest trends in amenity landscaping and garden maintenance. The congresses also provide the members with the opportunity to examine the training facilities and courses offered by the host countries.

    South Africa's representative has served on the executive committee for the past decade and has conducted specific comparative research for this qualification and for the Landscape qualifications for levels 3 and 4.

    Worldwide, the horticultural industry is composed of distinct disciplines, each catering to a particular sector of the market. In the past, training concentrated on the production of generalist horticulturalists. As in other industries, technological advancements have engendered a move to specialisations.

    Internationally, some countries commence their specialisations at level 1, for example Australia. In contrast, other countries have elected to begin their specialisations at levels 2 or 3. Various factors influence this, the most notable include:
  • Climatic conditions which restrict normal horticultural activities.
  • Economic constraints, typically the poorly developed economies where landscaping has a low priority.
  • Relatively small markets, where economies of scale preclude specialisations.

    To obtain an African perspective the qualifications of the following SADC countries were investigated: Angola, Botswana, DRC, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    From a global viewpoint these countries are typified as developing nations, with a primary focus on subsistence. Consequently agricultural training is paramount to ensuring food security for their populations. As agricultural land care practices are broadly parallel to landscaping, their learners that have had agricultural training may readily embark on a horizontal articulation in landscaping. Landscaped gardens are rare in these countries with the majority of landscaping occurring in the hotel and tourist fields. These projects and the maintenance thereof are usually contracted to South African landscaping companies. As a consequence no specific landscaping training is conducted in these areas. The horticulturists who maintain these landscapes are either sourced from South Africa or they obtain their qualifications from our tertiary institutions.

    Various international qualifications with similar content to this qualification were sourced. In examining these, the following have been used for comparison, although they do not necessarily address the subjects from the same perspective, they do contain aspects relevant to those used in South Africa. The following qualifications and the particular unit standards that were selected for comparison with various components of this qualification are listed hereunder.

    Australia

    The landscaping industry in Australia has a similar profile to that of South Africa, although they operate at a more advanced level. This is evidenced by the fact that specialisation in a specific field may occur from entry level. In addition, the learner may be required to undertake licensing before commencement of training or of entering the industry. Their various horticultural qualifications at each specific level do, however, include a number of common unit standards.

    The following qualifications were examined, and the notable similarities are:

    Certificate III in Horticulture (Landscape)-Reference No RTF30403:

    Of all the worldwide searches that were conducted, this level 3 qualification has the greatest similarity to its South African counterpart. The relevant unit standards are as follows:

    Reference No RTC3701A-Respond to emergencies:
  • This level 3 unit standard addresses the preparation for emergency situations and the implementation of control, evaluation of the emergency, action taken and the first aid techniques that should be applied.
  • The "Monitor and maintain health and safety standards in horticulture" unit standard has a similar intent to the above, in that it also refers to the preparation for emergency situations, but in addition it covers the practices for safe handling and storing of hazardous chemicals in the landscaping industry.

    Reference No RTC3404A-Control plant pests, diseases and disorders:
  • This level 3 unit standard is concerned with the assessment of pest infestations, the plan to control these including the implementation and monitoring of control measures.
  • The "Identify and control common pests in the horticultural environment" utilises a similar approach while relating this to the identification of common pests found in the area and the preventative control practices that could be considered.

    Reference No RTF3028A-Perform specialist amenity pruning:
  • This level 3 unit standard is concerned with the preparation for specialist amenity pruning, the act of pruning and the evaluation of the quality of pruning conducted.
  • The "Prune shrubs and other ornamental plants to promote quality flowering" unit standard incorporates a similar approach to the above with an emphasis on promoting the flowering capacity of the plants in the landscaping environment.

    Reference No RTF3018A-Implement a tree transplanting program:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the procedures used in preparing the tree for the process of transplanting, implementing transplanting operations and maintaining the health and viability of the transplanted tree in the landscape environment.
  • The "Transplant and establish trees and shrubs in horticultural areas" unit standard, in essence, follows the same procedures and methodology.

    Reference No RTF3036A-Plan and establish plant displays:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the process of planning and establishing plant displays indoors or as seasonal displays in garden beds.
  • The "Arrange and install a plant decoration" unit standard, in essence, follows the same procedures and methodology, but also includes the procedure for dismantling plant displays.

    Reference No RTF3012A-Implement a plant nutrition program:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the process for implementing a plant nutrition programme in the landscaping environment. It cover the preparation for implementation of a plant nutrition programme, determining the nutritional problems and the application of correct products for the problem identified in the landscaping environment.
  • The "Identify nutrient deficiencies in ornamental plants and apply the corrective measures" unit standard, in essence, follows the same procedures and methodology, but includes the practices that must be implemented to ensure that the correct balance of nutrients is maintained.

    Reference No RTE3605A-Troubleshoot irrigation systems:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the processes involved in troubleshooting faults and blockages in irrigation systems in the landscape environment.
  • The "Maintain landscape and sports turf irrigation systems" unit standard in essence, follows the same procedures and methodology, but includes the drafting of an annual irrigation schedule.

    Reference No RTF3612A-Implement a maintenance program for an irrigation system:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the process of implementing a maintenance programme for an irrigation system. It focuses on the interpretation of the maintenance programme, the inspection of the system and the action taken to repair the system in the landscape environment.
  • The "Maintain landscape and sports turf irrigation systems" unit standard in essence, follows the same procedures and methodology, but includes the drafting of an annual irrigation schedule.

    United Kingdom

    The United Kingdom has a long history of landscaping horticultural practice and is considered to be the origin of the modern horticultural foundational practice. South Africa has long been seen as an ideal horticultural environment, considering that it has the richest floral kingdom in the world. As a result many South African plants have been cultivated and hybridised in the United Kingdom with the loss of research and income to the country. It is imperative that, against this background, studies in landscape and horticultural practices in South Africa follow a professional path and are comparable, at least, to the best studies in the United Kingdom, but also within the broader international horticultural community.

    The qualifications from the United Kingdom at level 3 that may be favorably compared to the South African landscaping level 3 qualification are the:
  • NPTC Level 3 Advanced National Certificate in Horticulture.
  • NPTC Level 3 Advanced National Certificate in Horticulture: Landscape construction and maintenance.
  • NPTC Level 3 Advanced National Diploma in Horticulture.
  • NPTC Level 3 Advanced National Diploma in Horticulture: Landscape construction and maintenance.
  • BTEC Level 3 National Certificate in Horticulture.
  • BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Horticulture.
  • NPTC Level 3 Certificate in Amenity Horticulture (QCF).
  • NPTC Level 3 Award in Amenity Horticulture (QCF).
  • NPTC Level 3 Diploma in Amenity Horticulture (QCF).
  • NPTC Level 3 Advanced National Certificate in Sports and Amenity Turf Management.

    There are however, a number of stand-alone unit standards that have relevance to this qualification. These will be referred to briefly.

    The relevant unit standards are:

    Registration No Y/500/9063-Tree pests and diseases:
  • This level 3 unit standard is concerned with the understanding, identification and life cycles of pathogens that affect trees in particular. Monitoring, prevention and control measures are also covered.
  • The "Identify and control common pests in the horticultural environment" unit standard has a similar intent to the above, although its focus is broader in that it covers all plants in the landscaping environment and not only trees. The principles applied in the horticultural industry remain similar irrespective of the plant type.

    Registration No H/501/1155-Decorative horticulture:
  • This level 3 unit standard addresses the maintenance of plants for a decorative display. The focus is on planning, implementing and maintaining a display.
  • The "Arrange and install a plant decoration" unit standard has a similar purpose in that the learner will learn how to plan, select relevant plant material and install a plant display at or in a specific venue. In this unit standard the additional aspect of dismantling a plant display is addressed.

    Registration No J/501/1164-Sports Turf Maintenance:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the maintenance of sports turf surfaces. It caters for the broader, more generalist aspects of sports turf maintenance, but does include the identification and treatment of common diseases, weeds, pests and disorders for sports turf surfaces.
  • The "Maintain bowling greens" unit standard aims to provide the learner with the necessary information in order to manage the bowling green environment, the maintenance of the green, as well as the implementation of pest control and fertilising programmes. Over and above this, the unit standard also provides the learner with the opportunity to learn how to prepare the bowling greens for a tournament, which is not covered in the international unit standard referred to above.

    Registration No J/501/1178-Turf Irrigation and Drainage:
  • This level 3 unit standard serves to familiarize learners with the use, maintenance and repair of irrigation systems. Specifically the learner will have the opportunity to learn how to plan and maintain irrigation systems in the landscaping environment.
  • The "Maintain landscape and sports turf irrigation systems" unit standard focuses on the repair, service and maintenance of irrigation systems in the landscaping environment. This unit standard is comparable with the international unit standard referred to above, although the South African unit standard includes the drafting of an annual irrigation schedule.

    Registration No R/500/9062-Tree Identification, Planting and Care:
  • This level 3 unit standard addresses the selection criteria for a range of tree and shrub species, the planting of a wide range of trees and shrubs of various sizes and types in various situations and the care that needs to be provided after planting in the landscape.
  • The "Transplant and establish trees and shrubs in horticultural areas" unit standard is comparable to the above in its purpose, but, within the South African landscaping context, the learning covers the transplanting of trees and shrubs. It also refers to the identification and selection of trees and shrubs for the relevant environment, covering aspects such as safe transportation and initial care.

    Registration No Y/501/0455-Maintain and develop decorative horticultural displays:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the maintenance of the appearance and the health of the plants in horticultural displays.
  • The "Arrange and install a plant decoration" unit standard may be compared to the above in terms of the general practices applicable, but this unit standard also includes the selection of the plant and materials for the display, as well as the process of dismantling a plant display.

    Registration No J/501/0435-Plan the maintenance, repair and renovation of sports turf areas:
  • This level 3 unit standard covers the planning and implementation of maintenance operations for sports turf areas. Maintenance of the appearance and the health of the plants in horticultural displays.
  • The "Maintain bowling greens" unit standard may be compared to the above in terms of the general practices applicable, but this unit standard also includes the preparation of bowling greens for a tournament.

    Registration No D/501/0439-Maintain irrigation systems:
  • This level 3 unit standard addresses the routine and ad hoc maintenance to ensure the efficient operation of irrigation systems in the horticultural environment. It focuses on understanding how to maintain irrigation systems, the planning and implementation of maintenance programmes taking into consideration the planted areas.
  • The "Maintain landscape and sports turf irrigation systems" unit standard highlights the technical aspects of the maintenance, service and repair of the irrigation system, although the principles and requirements for maintenance are similarly covered.

    Registration No D/501/4054-Management of sports turf-Cricket facilities:
  • This level 3 unit standard provides learners with the knowledge and skills to manage the turf surfaces for cricket.
  • The "Supervise the maintenance of a turf cricket pitch and outfields" unit standard provides the learner with the knowledge to manage and monitor the maintenance of the cricket pitch and outfields, supervising the marking of outfields and pitches. This unit standard covers the selection and supervision of fertiliser applications. It also includes the monitoring of the operation and maintenance of the turf care machinery an equipment.

    Registration No h/501/4055-Management of sports turf-Bowling greens:
  • This level 3 unit standard provides learners with the knowledge and skills to manage bowling green surfaces.
  • The "Maintain bowling greens" unit standard focuses on the management of the bowling green environment, various turf improvement procedures in this context, maintenance of the relevant equipment, implementing a pest control and fertiliser programme and preparing the bowling greens for a tournament. It therefore covers a wider range of learning than the unit standard "Management of sports turf-Bowling greens".

    New Zealand

    No qualifications are registered at Level 3 for the landscaping field, although a number of horticultural unit standards have been generated that have some parallel components to those developed in the South African Landscaping qualification.

    Scotland

    No qualifications are registered at Level 3 for the landscaping field, although a number of horticultural unit standards have been generated that have some parallel components to those developed in the South African Landscaping qualification.

    Conclusion

    The three qualifications compare favourably against those offered in the UK and Australia. The South African unit standards have a greater content and detail than those of the above countries, which will ensure that learners will be able to gain the best possible training in the horticultural fields.

    The Scottish and New Zealand qualifications and unit standards have a limited focus on landscaping and therefore offer little in comparison.

    The USA has no formally recognized horticultural qualifications at the NQF 2 or 3 levels.

    SADC countries have no horticultural qualifications or unit standards, as their horticulturists are either sourced from South Africa or they obtain their qualifications from our tertiary institutions.

    In conclusion, the three qualifications meet and in many instances exceed the standards of training offered elsewhere in the world. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    The generic nature of this qualification and its focus on the foundational multi-skilling, facilitates the vertical articulation within the horticultural industry, to any of the following qualifications:

    Horizontal Articulation:
  • ID; 49052; National Certificate: Plant Production, NQF Level 3.

    Vertical Articulation:
  • ID; 49009; Further Education and Training Certificate: Plant Production, NQF Level 4.
  • ID; 58163; Further Education and Training Certificate: Community Recreation, NQF Level 4.
  • ID; 49127; Further Education and Training Certificate: Design Foundation, NQF Level 4.
  • ID; 61669; Further Education and Training Certificate: Community Water Sanitation and Health Facilitation, NQF Level4.

    As the basics of Agriculture and horticulture are parallel, horizontal articulation in the fields of Agronomy, Fruit and Vegetable Production, Nature Conservation and Forestry are possible. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner against these unit standards must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA and have experience or in depth knowledge of the horticultural industry.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable achievement of these unit standards or will assess these unit standards must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA. Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the moderation guidelines in the qualification and the agreed ETQA procedure.
  • Therefore anyone wishing to be assessed against these unit standards may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution which is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessors must:
  • Be accredited as an assessor by the relevant ETQA.
  • Have experience or in depth knowledge of the horticultural industry, specifically as it relates to ornamental aspects.
  • Meet any other requirements that may be stipulated by the relevant ETQA.
  • Hold a qualification in Horticulture or Agriculture at NQF Level 5 or higher. 

  • NOTES 
    As per the SAQA decision, after consultation with the Quality Councils, to re-register all qualifications and part qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework that meet the criteria for re-registration, this qualification has been re-registered from 1 July 2012.
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  264274  Apply biological and chemical control of alien invader plants  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  264235  Apply supervisory management principles in an enterprise  Level 3  NQF Level 03  10 
    Core  264259  Identify a range of ornamental plants used in the horticultural industry  Level 3  NQF Level 03  10 
    Core  264236  Identify and control common pests in the horticultural environment  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  264258  Identify and correct nutrient deficiencies in ornamental plants  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  264241  Identify the internal structures of ornamental plants  Level 3  NQF Level 03  10 
    Core  264234  Monitor and maintain health and safety standards in horticulture  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  264255  Mow and de-thatch grassed areas  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  264257  Prune shrubs and other ornamental plants  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9010  Demonstrate an understanding of the use of different number bases and measurement units and an awareness of error in the context of relevant calculations  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9013  Describe, apply, analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119466  Interpret a variety of literary texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9012  Investigate life and work related problems using data and probabilities  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  7456  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business and national issues  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  264195  Operate chainsaws for limbing and logging at ground level  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  264314  Apply spring treatment to bowling greens  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  264254  Arrange and install a plant decoration  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  264186  Conduct controlled tree felling in various locations  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  264041  Maintain landscape and sportsturf irrigation systems  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  264238  Utilise earthmoving equipment to excavate and shape a landscape  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  264239  Care for plants that require specific treatment or conditions in landscapes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  264240  Establish and manage a composting plant  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  264295  Maintain bowling greens  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  264237  Supervise the maintenance of a turf cricket pitch and outfields  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  264315  Transplant and establish trees and shrubs in horticultural areas  Level 4  NQF Level 04 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Quality Assuring Bodies have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Quality Assuring Body should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



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