SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED UNIT STANDARD: 

Demonstrate an understanding of prevention programmes in Victim Empowerment 
SAQA US ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE
120076  Demonstrate an understanding of prevention programmes in Victim Empowerment 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Victim Empowerment 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY
-  
FIELD SUBFIELD
Field 07 - Human and Social Studies People/Human-Centred Development 
ABET BAND UNIT STANDARD TYPE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
Undefined  Regular  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
REGISTRATION STATUS REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE SAQA DECISION NUMBER
Reregistered  2018-07-01  2023-06-30  SAQA 06120/18 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This unit standard does not replace any other unit standard and is not replaced by any other unit standard. 

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD 
The qualifying learner will gain an understanding of the value and impact of prevention programmes in Victim Empowerment. The learners will gain knowledge and skills to develop culturally appropriate prevention programmes and strategies for various categories of victims.

Learners accredited with this Unit Standard will be capable of:
  • Defining prevention in the context of Victim Empowerment.
  • Describing prevention strategies for child and youth violence.
  • Describing prevention of child and youth victimisation.
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the prevention of gender violence.
  • Describing environmental design and planning as a local crime prevention strategy. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that a learner will be competent in:
  • Communication at NQF level 3 or equivalent.
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF level 3 or equivalent. 

  • UNIT STANDARD RANGE 
  • Range: Public health interventions are traditionally characterized in terms of three levels of prevention:

    > Primary prevention - approaches that aim to prevent violence before it occurs.
    > Secondary prevention - approaches that focus on the more immediate responses to violence, such as pre-hospital care, emergency services or treatment for sexually transmitted diseases following a rape.
    > Tertiary prevention - approaches that focus on long-term care in the wake of violence, such as rehabilitation and reintegration, and attempts to lessen trauma or reduce the long-term disability associated with violence.
  • Range of preventative interventions includes, but is not limited to: creating crime awareness, preventing repeat victimisation, preventing victims from becoming perpetrators, community education and awareness regarding preventative lifestyles, etc.
  • Range of reactive interventions includes, but is not limited to: Victim aid such as emotional support, prioritisation of urgent crime areas, surveying victims' experiences of the Criminal Justice System, etc.
  • Range of sources include, but is not limited to: World Report on Violence and Health, National Crime Prevention Strategy, etc.
  • Range of strategies include, but is not limited to: individual approaches like anger management, relationship approaches like training in parenting, community based approaches like community policing, societal approaches like poverty alleviation, etc.
  • Range of programmes include, but is not limited to: programmes for youth both in and out of schools, gender, socialisation, healthy relationships, conflict resolution, other life skills, etc.
  • Range of legislative provisions include, but is not limited to: World Report on Violence and Health, Child Justice Bill, Sexual Offences Bill, etc.
  • Range of prevention strategies includes, but is not limited to: family support approaches like family preservation services, health service approaches like training of health care professionals, therapeutic approaches like services for victims, etc.
  • Range of risk factors include, but is not limited to: individual factors like history of violence and witnessing or experiencing violence as a child, relationship factors like dominance in the family, community factors like lack of employment and weak community sanctions against perpetrators, societal factors like societal norms supportive of male superiority and sexual entitlement, etc.
  • Range of impact includes, but is not limited to: economic impact, lost productivity, health impact, impact on children, emotional and behavioural problems, child prostitution, etc.
  • Range of principles according to the CSIR, 'Crime Prevention through Environmental Design in South Africa', include but are not limited to: surveillance and visibility, territoriality and defensible space, access and space routes, image and aesthetics, target hardening.
  • Range of strategies according to the CSIR' Designing Safer Places-manual for crime prevention through Planning and design, 2001 ', include but is not limited to: reducing vacant and undeveloped land, encouraging multi-functional use of spaces, etc. 

  • Specific Outcomes and Assessment Criteria: 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 1 
    Define prevention in the context of Victim Empowerment. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Primary, secondary and tertiary prevention is defined and the differences outlined in accordance with relevant organisational services. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION NOTES 
    These three levels of prevention are defined by their temporal aspect - whether prevention takes place before violence occurs, immediately afterwards or over the longer term. Although traditionally they are applied to victims of violence and within health care settings, secondary and tertiary prevention efforts have also been regarded as having relevance to the perpetrators of violence, and applied in judicial settings in response to violence. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Public health interventions are traditionally characterized in terms of three levels of prevention:
  • Primary prevention - approaches that aim to prevent violence before it occurs.
  • Secondary prevention - approaches that focus on the more immediate responses to violence, such as pre-hospital care, emergency services or treatment for sexually transmitted diseases following a rape.
  • Tertiary prevention - approaches that focus on long-term care in the wake of violence, such as rehabilitation and reintegration, and attempts to lessen trauma or reduce the long-term disability associated with violence.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Culturally appropriate social crime prevention in the South African context is defined and explained in relation to the multi-disciplinary and inter-sectoral approach employed in the sector. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Preventative and reactive interventions are distinguished by referring to appropriate examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
  • Preventative interventions includes, but is not limited to: creating crime awareness, preventing repeat victimisation, preventing victims from becoming perpetrators, community education and awareness regarding preventative lifestyles, etc.
  • Reactive interventions includes, but is not limited to: Victim aid such as emotional support, prioritisation of urgent crime areas, surveying victims' experiences of the Criminal Justice System, etc.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The public health approach to violence prevention is explained in accordance with national and international sources. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Sources include, but is not limited to: World Report on Violence and Health, National Crime Prevention Strategy, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 5 
    Tools and mechanisms for systematic monitoring and evaluation of prevention programmes are described with examples. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 2 
    Describe prevention strategies for child and youth violence. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    The distinction between child and youth victimisation is explained and clarified in relation to child and youth perpetrators. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Types of risk behaviours and key risk factors for child and youth violence are identified and briefly described in accordance with national and international sources. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Different strategies in preventing child and youth violence are explained with examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Strategies include, but is not limited to: World Health Report on Violence which outlines individual approaches like anger management, family support approaches like family preservation services, training in effective parenting, community based approaches like community policing, societal approaches like poverty alleviation, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    Prevention programmes for children and youth at risk are identified and described with relevant examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Programmes include, but is not limited to: programmes for youth both in and out of schools, gender, socialisation, healthy relationships, conflict resolution, anger management, sexuality, community education and awareness, youth at risk, perpetrators, and other life skills, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 5 
    The rationale and philosophy of working with perpetrators of child and youth violence is explained in accordance with appropriate National and international instruments. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 6 
    Relevant legislation and conditions governing referrals to programmes for perpetrators of child and youth violence is identified in accordance with relevant National and international instruments. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Legislative provisions include, but is not limited to: World Report on Violence and Health, Child Justice Bill, Sexual Offences Bill, etc.
     

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 3 
    Describe prevention of child and youth victimisation. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Risk factors for child and youth abuse and neglect are explained with examples. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Prevention strategies for child and youth abuse and neglect are identified and explained with examples. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Current legislative provisions in addressing child and youth abuse and neglect are discussed with examples. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The effectiveness of current prevention programmes for child abuse and neglect are discussed in order to improve service delivery. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 4 
    Demonstrate an understanding of the prevention of gender violence. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    The risk factors for gender violence are discussed using examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Risk factors include, but is not limited to: World Health Organisation report on Violence and Health refers to individual factors like history of violence and witnessing or experiencing violence as a child, relationship factors like dominance in the family, community factors like lack of employment and weak community sanctions against perpetrators, societal factors like societal norms supportive of male superiority and sexual entitlement, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The impact of gender violence on society is explained using relevant examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Impact includes, but is not limited to: economic impact, lost productivity, health impact, impact on children, emotional and behavioural problems, child prostitution, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Programmes to address gender violence are identified and described using relevant examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Programmes includes, but is not limited to: addressing gender stereotypes, socialisation and fostering healthy relationships, alternatives to violence e.g. conflict resolution and anger management, community education and awareness, programmes for youth at risk and perpetrators, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The rationale and philosophy of working with perpetrators of gender violence are explained in accordance with appropriate national and international instruments. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 5 
    Current legislative provisions and conditions governing referrals to programmes for perpetrators of gender violence are discussed in accordance with relevant national and international instruments. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 5 
    Describe environmental design and planning as a local crime prevention strategy. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    The concept of local crime prevention through environmental design is defined according to the National Crime Prevention Strategy. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Crime and victimisation trends and patterns in the local community are identified. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    The key role-players in crime prevention in local communities are identified and their specific roles highlighted according to the sector. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Role-players include, but is not limited to: South African Police Services, Local authorities, School Governing Bodies, Community Policing Forums, etc.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The limitations of local crime prevention strategies are identified according to relevant National and international sources. 


    UNIT STANDARD ACCREDITATION AND MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable achievement of this Unit Standard and the related Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification must be accredited by the relevant ETQA.
  • External Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA at its discretion.
  • The accredited Training Provider will oversee internal moderation of assessment.
  • Internal and external moderation should encompass achievement of competence described in this Unit Standard as well as the integrated competence described in the Exit Level Outcome of the Qualification. 

  • UNIT STANDARD ESSENTIAL EMBEDDED KNOWLEDGE 
  • National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS).
  • Integrated Victim Empowerment Policy.
  • Service Charter and minimum standards on services for victims of crime (2004).
  • World Report on Violence and Health (WHO, 2002).
  • Child Justice Bill.
  • Sexual Offences Bill. 

  • UNIT STANDARD DEVELOPMENTAL OUTCOME 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARD LINKAGES 
    N/A 


    Critical Cross-field Outcomes (CCFO): 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO IDENTIFYING 
    Identify and solve problems associated with prevention programmes in Victim Empowerment using responsible decision-making and creative thinking. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO WORKING 
    Work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community on a daily basis to effectively provide prevention programmes in Victim Empowerment. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO ORGANISING 
    Organise and manage oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively to cope with the stress, burnout and vicarious trauma of providing Victim Empowerment prevention programmes. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO COMMUNICATING 
    Communicate effectively using appropriate modes of oral and/or written persuasion with all role-players in a multidisciplinary and inter-sectoral approach to the delivery of prevention programmes. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO DEMONSTRATING 
    Demonstrate an understanding of the world, as a set of related systems by recognising that problem solving in presenting prevention programmes in Victim Empowerment exists in a variety of contexts. 

    UNIT STANDARD ASSESSOR CRITERIA 
    Assessors must be registered as assessors with a relevant ETQA, or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA. 

    REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this unit standard was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    UNIT STANDARD NOTES 
    N/A 

    QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
      ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
    Core  49872   Further Education and Training Certificate: Victim Empowerment Co-ordination  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Reregistered  2023-06-30  HW SETA 
    Elective  67509   Further Education and Training Certificate: Community Development  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Reregistered  2021-06-30  As per Learning Programmes recorded against this Qual 
    Elective  49836   Further Education and Training Certificate: Gender Practice  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Reregistered  2023-06-30  HW SETA 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.