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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED UNIT STANDARD THAT HAS PASSED THE END DATE: 

Understand the nature and importance of conservation 
SAQA US ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE
12650  Understand the nature and importance of conservation 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Nature Conservation 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY
-  
FIELD SUBFIELD
Field 01 - Agriculture and Nature Conservation Nature Conservation 
ABET BAND UNIT STANDARD TYPE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
Undefined  Regular  Level 1  NQF Level 01 
REGISTRATION STATUS REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE SAQA DECISION NUMBER
Passed the End Date -
Status was "Reregistered" 
2005-09-13  2008-09-13  SAQA 0160/05 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2009-09-13   2012-09-13  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This unit standard does not replace any other unit standard and is not replaced by any other unit standard. 

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD 
A person assessed as competent against this unit standard will be able to recognise that nature and cultural conservation are important, and will be able to identify approaches that promote conservation practices.

This competence will equip the qualifying learner with the skills required to undertake an important role in nature conservation and will the enhance the employability of the qualifying learner in both nature conservation and other related jobs.

In addition the learner will be well positioned to extend their learning and practice into other areas of conservation, or to strive towards conservation standards and practices at higher levels. 

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
A person taking this unit standard is assumed to have some basic literacy. 

UNIT STANDARD RANGE 
Guides to the scope and complexity of the specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge are provided in bullet points beneath each. These are prefaced by "e.g." since they are neither comprehensive nor necessarily appropriate to all contexts. Alternatives must however be comparable in scope and complexity. 

Specific Outcomes and Assessment Criteria: 

SPECIFIC OUTCOME 1 
Describe the scope of conservation. 
OUTCOME NOTES 
For example:
  • water
  • heritage
  • urban conservation
  • eco-tourism
  • scientific knowledge
  • indigenous knowledge systems
  • fauna and flora
  • community conservation
  • marine
  • geology
  • preservation vs. conservation
  • sustainability 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which learners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment, formative and summative assessment.
    Please note: learners for this standard may be unemployed, self-employed or in full employment. Assessors must ensure that assessment methods are appropriate for the learner's context.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a learner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent.
    Similarly, if a learner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-related, out-of-classroom simulation.

    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
    Direct observation - watch the learner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions.
    Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the learner.
    Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the learner to demonstrate in a simulated environment.
    Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard.
    Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (e.g. reports from a third party).

    Integrated assessment:
    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity. Please note if a learner has no formal workplace, simulations or projects can be used to reflect a complete activity.
  • Work out how learners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards.
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment.

    Contextualising the outcomes, embedded knowledge and CCOs:
    Assessing the following will ensure the specific outcomes, essential embedded knowledge and critical-cross-field outcomes are assessed.
    NB: at NQF Level 1 the learner's ability to make decisions and act may be restricted by the workplace or learning environment. The aim of many of the standards at this level is to provide a foundation of learning to enable application at higher levels.

    Demonstrated ability to make DECISIONS about practice and to ACT accordingly:
    Assessors should consider:
    1. The idea of nature and cultural conservation in relation to the definition.
    2. The notion of sustainability (e.g. utilisation vs. preservation).
    3. Examples of nature and cultural conservation practices e.g. species conservation, area conservation, heritage site conservation etc.
    4. Barriers to sustainable nature and cultural conservation.
    5. The types of benefits resulting from nature and cultural conservation e.g. genetic diversity, preservation of beauty, health, economic (e.g. tourist attractions) and recreational advantages etc.
    6. The types of problems resulting from lack of conservation e.g. extinction, scarcity, erosion, environmental damage, lack of tourist attractions etc.
    7. The inter-relatedness of systems e.g. links between preservation of habitat and species survival; history and identity. (Note: preservation is used in the context of habitat and species inter-relatedness.)
    8. A selection of locally scarce plants and animals in IUCN categories in relation to a specific context.
    9. A selection of heritage sites or cultural artefacts in relation to a specific context.

    Demonstrated ability to learn from our actions and to ADAPT PERFORMANCE:
    Assessors should consider:
    10. Learners' reflection on own performance in order to enhance future practice and learning. 

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 2 
    Describe conservation practices operating in a local context. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
    For example:
  • local resource use
  • rare species
  • problem animal control
  • resource utilisation
  • waste management (litter) 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which learners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment, formative and summative assessment.
    Please note: learners for this standard may be unemployed, self-employed or in full employment. Assessors must ensure that assessment methods are appropriate for the learner's context.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a learner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent.
    Similarly, if a learner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-related, out-of-classroom simulation.

    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
    Direct observation - watch the learner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions.
    Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the learner.
    Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the learner to demonstrate in a simulated environment.
    Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard.
    Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (e.g. reports from a third party).

    Integrated assessment:
    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity. Please note if a learner has no formal workplace, simulations or projects can be used to reflect a complete activity.
  • Work out how learners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards.
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment.

    Contextualising the outcomes, embedded knowledge and CCOs:
    Assessing the following will ensure the specific outcomes, essential embedded knowledge and critical-cross-field outcomes are assessed.
    NB: at NQF Level 1 the learner's ability to make decisions and act may be restricted by the workplace or learning environment. The aim of many of the standards at this level is to provide a foundation of learning to enable application at higher levels.

    Demonstrated ability to make DECISIONS about practice and to ACT accordingly:
    Assessors should consider:
    1. The idea of nature and cultural conservation in relation to the definition.
    2. The notion of sustainability (e.g. utilisation vs. preservation).
    3. Examples of nature and cultural conservation practices e.g. species conservation, area conservation, heritage site conservation etc.
    4. Barriers to sustainable nature and cultural conservation.
    5. The types of benefits resulting from nature and cultural conservation e.g. genetic diversity, preservation of beauty, health, economic (e.g. tourist attractions) and recreational advantages etc.
    6. The types of problems resulting from lack of conservation e.g. extinction, scarcity, erosion, environmental damage, lack of tourist attractions etc.
    7. The inter-relatedness of systems e.g. links between preservation of habitat and species survival; history and identity. (Note: preservation is used in the context of habitat and species inter-relatedness.)
    8. A selection of locally scarce plants and animals in IUCN categories in relation to a specific context.
    9. A selection of heritage sites or cultural artefacts in relation to a specific context.

    Demonstrated ability to learn from our actions and to ADAPT PERFORMANCE:
    Assessors should consider:
    10. Learners' reflection on own performance in order to enhance future practice and learning. 

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 3 
    Explain why conservation is important. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which learners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment, formative and summative assessment.
    Please note: learners for this standard may be unemployed, self-employed or in full employment. Assessors must ensure that assessment methods are appropriate for the learner's context.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a learner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent.
    Similarly, if a learner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-related, out-of-classroom simulation.

    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
    Direct observation - watch the learner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions.
    Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the learner.
    Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the learner to demonstrate in a simulated environment.
    Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard.
    Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (e.g. reports from a third party).

    Integrated assessment:
    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity. Please note if a learner has no formal workplace, simulations or projects can be used to reflect a complete activity.
  • Work out how learners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards.
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment.

    Contextualising the outcomes, embedded knowledge and CCOs:
    Assessing the following will ensure the specific outcomes, essential embedded knowledge and critical-cross-field outcomes are assessed.
    NB: at NQF Level 1 the learner's ability to make decisions and act may be restricted by the workplace or learning environment. The aim of many of the standards at this level is to provide a foundation of learning to enable application at higher levels.

    Demonstrated ability to make DECISIONS about practice and to ACT accordingly:
    Assessors should consider:
    1. The idea of nature and cultural conservation in relation to the definition.
    2. The notion of sustainability (e.g. utilisation vs. preservation).
    3. Examples of nature and cultural conservation practices e.g. species conservation, area conservation, heritage site conservation etc.
    4. Barriers to sustainable nature and cultural conservation.
    5. The types of benefits resulting from nature and cultural conservation e.g. genetic diversity, preservation of beauty, health, economic (e.g. tourist attractions) and recreational advantages etc.
    6. The types of problems resulting from lack of conservation e.g. extinction, scarcity, erosion, environmental damage, lack of tourist attractions etc.
    7. The inter-relatedness of systems e.g. links between preservation of habitat and species survival; history and identity. (Note: preservation is used in the context of habitat and species inter-relatedness.)
    8. A selection of locally scarce plants and animals in IUCN categories in relation to a specific context.
    9. A selection of heritage sites or cultural artefacts in relation to a specific context.

    Demonstrated ability to learn from our actions and to ADAPT PERFORMANCE:
    Assessors should consider:
    10. Learners' reflection on own performance in order to enhance future practice and learning. 

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 4 
    Describe factors impacting on conservation in the local environment. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
    For example:
  • upstream water usage
  • land use practices
  • trade in species
  • drought
  • floods
  • over-utilisation 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which learners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment, formative and summative assessment.
    Please note: learners for this standard may be unemployed, self-employed or in full employment. Assessors must ensure that assessment methods are appropriate for the learner's context.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a learner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent.
    Similarly, if a learner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-related, out-of-classroom simulation.

    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
    Direct observation - watch the learner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions.
    Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the learner.
    Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the learner to demonstrate in a simulated environment.
    Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard.
    Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (e.g. reports from a third party).

    Integrated assessment:
    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity. Please note if a learner has no formal workplace, simulations or projects can be used to reflect a complete activity.
  • Work out how learners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards.
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment.

    Contextualising the outcomes, embedded knowledge and CCOs:
    Assessing the following will ensure the specific outcomes, essential embedded knowledge and critical-cross-field outcomes are assessed.
    NB: at NQF Level 1 the learner's ability to make decisions and act may be restricted by the workplace or learning environment. The aim of many of the standards at this level is to provide a foundation of learning to enable application at higher levels.

    Demonstrated ability to make DECISIONS about practice and to ACT accordingly:
    Assessors should consider:
    1. The idea of nature and cultural conservation in relation to the definition.
    2. The notion of sustainability (e.g. utilisation vs. preservation).
    3. Examples of nature and cultural conservation practices e.g. species conservation, area conservation, heritage site conservation etc.
    4. Barriers to sustainable nature and cultural conservation.
    5. The types of benefits resulting from nature and cultural conservation e.g. genetic diversity, preservation of beauty, health, economic (e.g. tourist attractions) and recreational advantages etc.
    6. The types of problems resulting from lack of conservation e.g. extinction, scarcity, erosion, environmental damage, lack of tourist attractions etc.
    7. The inter-relatedness of systems e.g. links between preservation of habitat and species survival; history and identity. (Note: preservation is used in the context of habitat and species inter-relatedness.)
    8. A selection of locally scarce plants and animals in IUCN categories in relation to a specific context.
    9. A selection of heritage sites or cultural artefacts in relation to a specific context.

    Demonstrated ability to learn from our actions and to ADAPT PERFORMANCE:
    Assessors should consider:
    10. Learners' reflection on own performance in order to enhance future practice and learning. 

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 5 
    List locally scarce resources according to best conservation practices. 
    OUTCOME NOTES 
    For example:
  • Red lists
  • indigenous knowledge
  • ordinances and Acts
  • international conventions
  • artefacts
  • heritage sites
  • geological features
  • fauna and flora 

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    When conducting assessments, assessors must ensure that they are familiar with the full text of the Unit standards being assessed.

    They must ensure that the assessment covers the specific outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes and essential embedded knowledge.

    As each situation is different, it will be necessary to develop assessment activities and tools, which are appropriate to the contexts in which learners are working. These activities and tools may include self-assessment, peer assessment, formative and summative assessment.
    Please note: learners for this standard may be unemployed, self-employed or in full employment. Assessors must ensure that assessment methods are appropriate for the learner's context.

    The specific outcomes and essential embedded knowledge must be assessed in relation to each other. If a learner is able to explain the essential embedded knowledge but is unable to perform the specific outcomes, they should not be assessed as competent.
    Similarly, if a learner is able to perform the specific outcomes but is unable to explain or justify their performance in terms of the essential embedded knowledge, they should not be assessed as competent.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

    Assessment should include practical demonstration of competence, either in the workplace or through work-related, out-of-classroom simulation.

    A range of assessment methods should be used, including:
    Direct observation - watch the learner carry out the task or produce a desired outcome during the course of his or her normal work under normal workplace conditions.
    Product sample - examine the outcomes previously produced by the learner.
    Simulation of a specific task - set a specific task for the learner to demonstrate in a simulated environment.
    Questioning (verbal or written) - ask relevant questions linked to the unit standard.
    Testimony - collect a portfolio of evidence from suitable people (e.g. reports from a third party).

    Integrated assessment:
    It may be more effective and efficient to assess a number of unit standards together thus reducing the overall number of assessment 'events'.
  • Consider a complete activity in the workplace (the 'whole of work' approach) and see which unit standards relate to this activity. Please note if a learner has no formal workplace, simulations or projects can be used to reflect a complete activity.
  • Work out how learners could collect evidence on a number of unit standards at the same time covering all the critical aspects of the standards.
  • Ensure that commonalities that exist between a number of unit standards are captured in a way that makes sense for assessment.

    Contextualising the outcomes, embedded knowledge and CCOs:
    Assessing the following will ensure the specific outcomes, essential embedded knowledge and critical-cross-field outcomes are assessed.
    NB: at NQF Level 1 the learner's ability to make decisions and act may be restricted by the workplace or learning environment. The aim of many of the standards at this level is to provide a foundation of learning to enable application at higher levels.

    Demonstrated ability to make DECISIONS about practice and to ACT accordingly:
    Assessors should consider:
    1. The idea of nature and cultural conservation in relation to the definition.
    2. The notion of sustainability (e.g. utilisation vs. preservation).
    3. Examples of nature and cultural conservation practices e.g. species conservation, area conservation, heritage site conservation etc.
    4. Barriers to sustainable nature and cultural conservation.
    5. The types of benefits resulting from nature and cultural conservation e.g. genetic diversity, preservation of beauty, health, economic (e.g. tourist attractions) and recreational advantages etc.
    6. The types of problems resulting from lack of conservation e.g. extinction, scarcity, erosion, environmental damage, lack of tourist attractions etc.
    7. The inter-relatedness of systems e.g. links between preservation of habitat and species survival; history and identity. (Note: preservation is used in the context of habitat and species inter-relatedness.)
    8. A selection of locally scarce plants and animals in IUCN categories in relation to a specific context.
    9. A selection of heritage sites or cultural artefacts in relation to a specific context.

    Demonstrated ability to learn from our actions and to ADAPT PERFORMANCE:
    Assessors should consider:
    10. Learners' reflection on own performance in order to enhance future practice and learning. 


  • UNIT STANDARD ACCREDITATION AND MODERATION OPTIONS 
    1. Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this unit standard must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA.
    2. Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this unit standard must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA.
    3. Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the ETQAs policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation; in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between ETQAs (including professional bodies); and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed under point 4 immediately below.
    4. Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual unit standards as well as the integrated competence described in the qualification.

    Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

    UNIT STANDARD ESSENTIAL EMBEDDED KNOWLEDGE 
    The knowledge component of this standard is:
  • The scope of conservation.
  • Factors impacting on conservation.
  • The importance of conservation.
  • Basic impact of conservation practices at a local level.
  • Conservation status and categories.
  • Indigenous knowledge illustrating changing trends in the local environment. 


  • UNIT STANDARD NOTES 
    Conservation is defined by the IUCN as: "Management of human use of the biosphere so that it may yield the greatest sustainable benefit to present generations while maintaining its potential to meet the need and aspirations of future generations. Thus conservation is positive, embracing preservation, maintenance, sustainable utilisation, restoration and enhancement of the natural environment."


    This Unit Standard relates to Critical Cross-field Outcomes. 

    QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
      ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
    Core  22971   General Education and Training Certificate: Conservation  Level 1  NQF Level 01  Passed the End Date -
    Status was "Reregistered" 
    2012-06-30  CATHSSETA 
    Core  50225   General Education and Training Certificate: General Forestry  Level 1  NQF Level 01  Reregistered  2023-06-30  FPMSETA 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. Aniathu Trading (Pty) Ltd 
    2. AQUILA TRAINING 
    3. Assured Vocational Skills Institute (Pty) Ltd 
    4. Babina Tlou Trading and Projects cc 
    5. Bontham Training & Agricultural Consultants 
    6. BS Training Services 
    7. CMO Logistics Pty Ltd 
    8. Coalition Trading 1238 cc 
    9. Cradle Stars Trading Enterprise (Pty) Ltd 
    10. Donnybrook Education & Training College (Pty) Ltd 
    11. Ebotse Development and Training Centre 
    12. Ehlanzeni TVET College 
    13. ENB Training Service(PTY)Ltd 
    14. I Care Resource Centre 
    15. Inyapa Vhusiku Consulting Pty Ltd 
    16. Kwamahlati Training Services cc 
    17. Legal Environment Safety & Health Requirements cc 
    18. Letaba TVET College 
    19. Liston Agri Solution & Training Consultancy 
    20. Lomkhethi Trading Enterprise 
    21. Longata Consultant 
    22. Maab Training Management ( Pty) Ltd 
    23. MARGER TRAINING AND PROTERTIES (PTY) LTD 
    24. Morongwa Consulting Services (Pty) Ltd 
    25. New Business Initiative Management Consultancy 
    26. Nikwe Trading (Pty) Ltd 
    27. Nkulungwane General Trader cc 
    28. Platorand Training Centre 
    29. Rally Business Consulting PTY LTD 
    30. Rekopane Training Centre CC 
    31. Russel Meaker cc 
    32. South African Forestry Training College 
    33. Striving Mind Trading & Projects 
    34. Sunrise Skills Training 
    35. Talent Sculpure Academy (Pty) Ltd 
    36. Tiriso Investments 
    37. Ubucubu Home Industries 
    38. Umbuso Training Services 
    39. Uphiwekonke Holdings (Pty) Ltd 
    40. VEB CELE & Associates (Pty) Ltd 
    41. Vicmat Consultants 
    42. VPK BUSINESS VENTURE C C 
    43. Yangantle Trading 
    44. York Timbers Pty Ltd 
    45. ZUCRO PROJECT CC 



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