SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Close Protection 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
58696  National Certificate: Close Protection 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Security 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
SAS SETA - Safety and Security SETA  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 08 - Law, Military Science and Security  Safety in Society 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  131  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This qualification is intended for individuals interested in the close protection field be they new entrants, security personnel or government officials within the arena of safety in society and other persons involved in close protection functions. Learners who achieve this qualification will be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills including attitudes and values pertinent to the close protection sector. The close protection learner will not only gain the protection competencies needed by this sector, but will also gain valuable skills in terms of conflict management, protocol, etiquette, diplomacy and threat and risk analysis.

Close protection officers are often required not only to react appropriately to any threat or situation confronting or impeding his/her principal, but also to plan activities of the principals whom they are protecting (taking into account risks and hazards) and to interact with diplomatic, public and other figures. This qualification is designed to produce a well-rounded individual who is able to manage difficult and sensitive situations. Physical protection is normally the last action which such an individual must take as the planning and conflict resolution skills should always be utilised first in all risk related matters.

This qualification intends to provide learners with competencies that will enable them to provide professional close protection services by way of creating and maintaining a safe and secure environment within which a principal(s) can conduct his/her activities relative free of threat, harassment, embarrassment and undue interference. This qualification is designed to provide learners who wish to join the close protection service sector with competencies to respond and deal effectively with, situations that may detrimentally affect their principal(s), within the prevailing regulations and legal prescripts.

Competent learners will be capable of:
  • Researching protective risk related information.
  • Formulating a risk profile.
  • Planning and preparing for a close protection operation.
  • Implementing close protective measures.
  • Communicating with role-players within the context of protective operation.

    Rationale:

    The security sector plays an integral part in South Africa as it assists the law enforcement sector with a sustained environment in which crime is prevented and deterred. It is therefore, vital to ensure that persons within the ambit of private and public close protection are adequately trained and educated in terms of their competencies, skills and values. The security domain is divided into different sectors of which close protection is one.

    Close protection is a vital domain of security as it provides protection services to public and private figures such as high-ranking governmental officials and dignitaries. The creation of a safe and secure environment for these public and private figures is important as it creates a stable platform for them to fulfil their mandates and roles. Without their safety they would be unable to contribute to the country on various levels including, political, business, scientific, Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and entertainment levels. While the general security of the society in the country plays an important role to ensure that all citizens are secured and protected, it is of national interest that individuals such as business leaders, diplomats, dignitaries, celebrities and the general public are protected. Therefore this qualification plays a pivotal role in fulfilling the need for a safe and protected environment. This qualification will enable learners to gain knowledge and skills to assist principal(s) live their lives in a safe and secure environment. The importance and impact of Close Protection in South Africa is significant, especially with the current development initiatives by government to improve the economy of the country, for example, protection of dignitaries from other countries visiting the South African government, international sporting events and concerts where protection is needed for both individuals and spectators.

    Most learners endeavouring to complete this qualification may come from the law enforcement, defence and private security sector. Many of them would have completed a qualification in basic security aspects and will then move on to complete this qualification as it forms an area of specialisation within the security sector. However, this qualification has also been designed to allow learners who have no previous experience to access the sector. Learners entering this qualification will be able to progress vertically from generic security and law enforcement services qualifications to more specialized close protection services as well as articulate horizontally to security management practices, bomb disposal, policing, special combat capabilities and certain emergency medical care qualifications.

    Currently there are a limited number of trained individuals who were either trained overseas or within the government sector to perform exclusive close protection services and as a result there is a serious shortage of trained people in this field. The number of current close protection officers in the country is limited hence the need for this qualification is eminent in order to develop a pool of close protection officers. The qualification facilitates access to education, training and a career path within the close protection services thus developing a pool of qualified, professional close protection personnel. This qualification aims to formalize close protection as a credible profession in South Africa as there was previously no complete formal qualification recognized by authorities or registered on the South African National Qualifications Framework (NQF). 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
  • Communication at NQF Level 4.
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4.

    It is assumed that learners are competent in the following unit standards:
  • "Operate a rigid light vehicle", ID 123257.
  • "Demonstrate knowledge of Firearms Control Act ", ID 117705.
  • "Handle and use a handgun", ID 119649.
  • "Provide risk based primary emergency care/first aid as an advanced first responder in the workplace", ID120336.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This qualification can be achieved wholly or in part through Recognition of Prior Learning. The learner and assessor will jointly decide on methods to determine prior learning and competence implicit in the qualification and the associated unit standards. Recognition of prior learning should be done by means of integrated assessment. Due to the fact that there are persons who are already working in this sector, the RPL process may allow for:
  • Accelerated access to further learning.
  • Gaining of credits contained in the unit standards of this qualification.

    Access to the Qualification:

    Senior certificate or equivalent, learners without an equivalent NQF Level 4 qualification can gain access through the application of Recognition of Prior Learning. Learners with certain physical disabilities may find it difficult to successfully complete this qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    Fundamental:

    All the unit standards to the value of 20 credits in the fundamental component are compulsory.

    Core:

    All the unit standards to the value of 92 credits in the core component are compulsory.

    Electives:

    Learners must complete unit standards to the value of at least 19 credits in the elective credits. The elective unit standards are clustered to provide areas of specialisation within the close protection domain. Learners choosing an area of specialisation must complete all unit standards listed within that area of specialisation. Learners choosing not to specialise are limited to choosing unit standard from the generic cluster listed below to the value of 19 credits. Should an area of specialisation not contain the prescribed minimum elective credits needed to complete the qualification, learners may choose additional credits from the generic elective component. The specialisations are:

    Counter Assault Operations Specialization:
  • Handle and use a shotgun for business purposes.
  • Demonstrate tactical proficiency with a shotgun.
  • Handle and use a self loading rifle or carbine for business.
  • Demonstrate tactical proficiency with a self loading rifle or carbine.
  • Handle and use a manual operated rifle or carbine for business purposes.
  • Demonstrate tactical and street survival techniques.

    Events Security Specialization:
  • Apply technical knowledge and skill in an emergency situation.
  • Conduct security at an event.

    Protective Information Practices Specialization:
  • Apply principles of risk management.
  • Conduct a security threat assessment in a defined operational area.
  • Develop an incident management plan.

    Generic Electives:
  • Write and present for a wide range of purposes audiences and contexts.
  • Implement policies regarding HIV/AIDS in the workplace.
  • Interpret the principles contained in basic South African law as entrenched in the constitution and the Bill of Rights.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of stress in order to apply strategies to achieve optimal stress levels in personal and work situations.
  • Apply leadership concepts in a work context.
  • Identify and explain explosives.
  • Negotiate and manage conflict in the workplace.
  • Demonstrate tactical and street survival techniques.
  • Supervise shooting exercises.
  • Provide first aid as an advanced first responder.

    The elective component of this qualification is left open ended in order to allow the learner to choose unit standards that will add to this qualification. Further elective clusters such as remote emergency assistance, control room operations and surveillance may be added in future. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Research protective risk related information.
  • Range: Risk related information refers to information directly relevant to a protection operation.

    2. Formulate a risk profile.

    3. Plan and prepare for a close protection operation.

    4. Implement close protective measures.
  • Range: Close protective measures include but are not limited to proactive and reactive, static and transit measures.

    5. Communicate with role-players within the context of close protection operations.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    This qualification addresses the following Critical Cross-Field Outcomes, as detailed and expressed in the associated unit standards:

    1. Problem-solving.
  • Range: Identifying and solving problems in which responses indicate that responsible decisions using critical and creative thinking have been made when acting on decisions to solve close protection industry related problems efficiently and effectively.

    2. Working effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community.
  • Range: Working effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation, or community by participating effectively in carrying joint work with other people and helping to improve the work of his/her immediate team to meet organizational goals and objectives.

    3. Organising and managing oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively.
  • Range: Organizing and managing oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively through prioritizing personal tasks and maintaining as well as implementing a task list.

    4. Collecting, analysing and organising information.
  • Range: Collecting, analysing, organizing and critically evaluate information when determining and implementing a course of action.

    5. Communicating effectively.
  • Range: Communicating effectively, using visual, mathematical and/or language skills in the modes of oral and/or written communication and persuasion.

    6. Using science.
  • Range: Using science and technology effectively and critically, showing responsibility towards the environment and the well being of others by using technology to gather and interpret information relating to security risks.

    7. Understanding the world as a set of related systems.
  • Range: Demonstrating an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognizing that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation when engaging with complex interrelated aspects of society and challenges and demands of close protection from the legal, ethical, economical and political perspectives.

    8. Understanding the learner and society.
  • Range: Participating as responsible citizens in the life of local, national and global communities as the knowledge and skills acquired will contribute towards effective and efficient close protection practice. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 Sources of information are identified to conduct risk analysis.
  • Range: Information refers to but is not limited to the information about the principal, routes, venue, closed and open sources and government agencies.
    1.2 Information gathering methods are used to access information in order to compile a risk profile.
  • Range: Information may refer to but is not limited to interviews, fieldwork and questionnaires.
    1.3 Gathered information is assessed and interpreted to determine its validity, relevance and priority.
    1.4 Information is reviewed in order to inform future decision-making.

    Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 A risk profile is reviewed in order to inform future protective actions and decision-making.
    2.2 Terminology and concepts used in risk profiling are described to establish standardisation.
    2.3 Information is analysed for risk analysis purposes.
  • Range: Analysis must include specific and generic risk identification.
    2.4 Potential risk is quantified in order to compile a risk profile.
  • Range: Quantification refers to but is not limited to level of risk, possible implications and possible limitations. Potential risk may include health and safety hazards, medical, traffic, environmental, location and cultural threats.
    2.5 A risk forecast is determined and communicated to role-players.
  • Range: Risk forecast must contain forecasts pertaining to protocol, logistics, financial constraints and human resources needs.
    2.6 A risk profile is collated for operational use.

    Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 Key role-players are identified in line with the given risk profile.
    3.2 Operational requirements are determined for planning purposes.
  • Range: Operational requirements refer to administration resources, logistical resources, financial resources, accommodation and human resources.
    3.3 Personal strengths and weaknesses of self, employees and principals are assessed in order to match them with operational requirements.
    3.4 Operational plan is formulated in line with operational requirements.
  • Range: Operational plan refers but is not limited to a venue plan, route plan and pedestrian escort plan (including emergencies, contingency plans).
    3.5 The operational plan is reviewed to inform future operational decisions.
    3.6 Factors influencing the operation are assessed to determine their impact.
  • Range: Factors include but are not limited to psychological, cultural, resource and protocol factors.

    Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:

    4.1 The importance of reviewing protective measures is explained to inform future decision-making.
    4.2 Protective measures are selected in terms of their advantages and disadvantages in given situations.
  • Range: Given situations refer but are not limited to case studies, structured scenarios, role-plays and simulations.
    4.3 Protective measures are applied in line with the operational plan.

    Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:

    5.1 Communication techniques are identified for use in close protection operation.
  • Range: Communication techniques refer but are not limited to verbal and non-verbal and emergency indicators such as hand signals.
    5.2 Protocol and etiquette is adhered to when communicating with the principal and other role-players.
  • Range: Protocol and etiquette refer but are not limited to accepted, prescribed official and unofficial protocol, etiquette, religious and cultural norms.
    5.3 Reports are collated for record-keeping purposes.
  • Range: Reports refer but are not limited to written (such as occurrence book, operational diary entries), electronic and verbal reports.

    Integrated Assessment:

    The assessment criteria embedded in the unit standards contained in this qualification are performance-based, assessing applied competence (practical, foundational and reflective) competencies regarding security management related knowledge and skills. The learner assessed against this qualification should be able to integrate the various unit standards outcomes to be able to practice as a close protection officer. Both formative and summative assessments are required so that learners are given feedback on their progress in achievement of specific learning outcomes. The qualification should be assessed on the basis of evidence of demonstrated performance in the workplace or in simulated work situations designed to draw upon similar performance to that required at the workplace.

    The summative assessment should be concerned with the judgment of the learning in relation to the exit level outcomes, which evaluates the learner's ability to integrate knowledge and skills as well as the attitude or behaviour required to provide security management services and deal effectively with difficult and sensitive situations. Assessment of communication and mathematical literacy should be integrated as far as possible within the context of specific learning.

    All exit level outcomes, critical cross-field outcomes, and essential embedded knowledge required by the component unit standards are to be assessed. Evidence of the achievement of the critical cross-field outcomes should be found both in performance and in explaining and applying the essential embedded knowledge. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    It must be highlighted that the security industry especially within the close protection sector is a highly regulated industry whose information is regarded as sensitive and protected and may not be easily accessible.

    Background and rationale for the choice of countries for comparison.

    Close Protection training is a highly regulated and sophisticated practice. When selecting countries for comparison, a well-documented and comprehensive report on research conducted in the sector with special reference to training was sought, with a view seeking those countries where close protection or security management practices are regarded to be of high quality. The United Kingdom, Israel and Australia were chosen as they embody current best practice in terms of Close Protection. The United States of America was not chosen as there is no universal standard set for the entire country (Standards are determined on a state by state basis). However, research indicated that there were training institutions in the USA providing training services on close protection. It was found that countries in Africa either had limited regulatory structures and/or no established close protection training standards, hence conducting a comparison with them was very difficult. Most African and developing countries use military and law enforcement agencies to conduct close protection of their political and public figures and were loath to exchange information in this regard.

    When determining international comparability it is important to note that South Africa has been a leader in Security regulation and monitored training for many years. An example of this is the fact that our security regulatory authority PSIRA (the former Security Officers Board) has been in existence since 1986, whereas, the Security Industry Authority (SIA) of the United Kingdom has only been operational for the last two years.

    It is quite clear that in terms of South African training standards and competencies of local close protection officers, the unique operational requirements of the South African environment need to be prioritized. This qualification not only matches the competency outcomes of similar type international qualifications but takes them a step further.

    The United Kingdom:

    Currently the UK is governed by the Security Industry Authority (SIA) a subdivision of the Home Office which has in place a set standard for Close Protection training. The UK standard includes almost no hard skills (firearms and non-lethal weapons training) and would not be transferable in the South African environment for obvious reasons. However, the converse would be true in terms of the soft skills competencies of their qualification which would have a direct relationship with the National Certificate: Close Protection which also emphasise the soft skills needed such as diplomatic protocol, verbal conflict management and operating within current legal frameworks.

    In the UK the security industry training standards are set by the Security Industry Authority (SIA) which is responsible for licensing and regulation via awarding bodies (similar to the South African qualification generation bodies (such as SGBs) and the quality control mechanisms (such as ETQA's). SIA fulfils similar functions to PSIRA in South Africa.

    There are also qualifications level ratings based on the National Vocational Qualifications (NVQ) system which correspond to South Africa's National Qualifications Framework (NQF). The primary difference being that the NQF takes all qualifications into account while the NVQ concentrates on vocational qualifications and not on tertiary level qualifications such as university degrees. The National Certificate: Close Protection is deemed to fit NQF level 5 according to the level descriptor document while the VQ qualification of the UK is deemed to fit level descriptors pertaining to their level 3.

    Israel:

    At a superficial level it appears as if the close protection industry in Israel is unregulated. However, on closer examination close protection officers candidates in Israel must still meet minimum firearms' competencies which are covered by the National Certificate: Close Protection in terms of learning assumed to be in place as well as in the elective component. The fact that military service is compulsory in Israel seems to have created a surplus of persons in the close protection environment.

    The infrastructure of private security regulation in Israel is quite capable of creating a separate database and regulatory body for Close Protection Officers (in terms of established regulatory bodies, potential inspectors and penalty systems for non-compliance). However, it seems that it has been the Israeli authorities' choice to regulate Close Protection as part of the whole private security industry. Moreover, Israel has a strict implementation of regulating the private security industry (i.e. sight inspections and penalties or prosecution for utilising non-registered operatives).

    Overall, the key information extracted from interviews conducted seems to indicate that the infrastructure for regulation seems to be in place but it is the lack of suitable standards, specifically for close protection, that fails to separate qualified persons in close protection from the rest of the private security industry operatives in Israel.

    Australia:

    Again, like the case of the USA, it was difficult to utilise Australia as a base for comparison since each state (seven) in Australia has different laws, standards and regulation procedures. However, the findings of research indicated that close protection industry in Australia is highly regulated and very closely monitored. On the whole the demand for private sector close protection officers in Australia appears quite low compared to South Africa. In Australia the vast majority of close protection tasks are performed by the relevant authorities, police or other government agencies such as the Federal Protection Service on either a federal or state level.

    The majority of information gathered was focused on New South Wales (NSW). The regulations in place in NSW seem to be more or less consistent with the other states in Australia that seemed to have relatively minor differences (i.e. registration fees, renewal procedures, scope of duties that private security officers can apply, etc.) in terms of this research.

    The key consideration is that there is a unit standard equivalent titled: Perform Close Personal Protection Duties (PUAPPP001A), which is in place and listed on the Australian National Training Information Service. It is, however, not available for civilian perusal. The fact that a standard exists clearly indicates that there are set minimum standards for operational competency of Close Protection Operatives in place for Australia as a whole.

    In NSW, a regulation and licensing procedure for close protection officers is in place with an expiry period (the duration of a licence varies from one to five years) applicable to such licences. The overseeing body is the Security Industry Registry which is administered by the NSW police service (http://www.police.nsw.gov.au). Each state in Australia also recognises licenses from one another. However, in order to operate in different states a close protection officer must register with the relevant authority in each state (i.e. the Security Industry Registry in Victoria) before being able to work in that state.

    The Australian close protection industry seems to conform to all aspects covered by the National certificate: Close Protection, however, interesting questions seemed to have been raised in the Australian context on aspects such as:

    1. Is over-regulation making it too difficult for potential close protection officers to enter the market? In the National Certificate: Close Protection it is emphasised that access is of an inclusive nature rather than exclusionary in line with the objectives of the NQF.

    2. Is the highest level of training actually being offered since there is not really a comparative environment? Comparison in this regard is quite difficult in Australia as the private sector has not yet gained momentum, however, in South Africa the public and the private sector are both currently engaged within the close protection environment. In South Africa the minimum standards as outlined but the National Certificate: Close Protection is set high as this qualification caters for both the private and government sectors such as the South African Police Service, the South African Air Force and the National Key Points.

    3. With the majority of training in Australia being provided by state agencies and very little private sector training taking place (as compared to South Africa where formalised private close protection training has been offered since 1995), the scope of career development for close protection officers is very limited e.g. the highest tertiary qualification is a Diploma in Security Management with no further security related qualifications being available. The National Certificate: Close Protection ensures proper articulation into the further Higher Education band by articulating to qualifications such as the Bachelor: Policing Practices currently registered on the NQF.

    SADC region:
  • Botswana:

    Further searches were conducted in the SADC region including Botswana, and no formalised training standards were found for comparison purposes. Close protection officers from Africa are mostly trained either in South Africa or overseas.

    Note: The above International Comparability was sourced from a Masters thesis on the subject of the professionalisation of the Close Protection industry worldwide by Gavriel Schneider under the auspices of UNISA. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This qualification articulates horizontally with the following registered qualifications:
  • ID 49124: National Diploma: Bomb Disposal, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 48879: National Diploma: South African Special Forces Operations, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 50122: National Certificate: Policing, NQF Level 5.

    This qualification articulates vertically with the following registered qualifications:
  • ID 50194: BA. Policing Practices, NQF Level 6.
  • National Diploma: Policing at NQF Level 6.
  • B Tech Security Risk Management. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • An individual wishing to be assessed (including through RPL) against this Qualification may apply to an assessment agency, assessor or provider institution accredited by the relevant ETQA, or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Anyone assessing a learner against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable achievement of this Qualification or assessing this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Moderation of assessment will be conducted by the relevant ETQA at its discretion.
  • Persons wishing to moderate this Qualification must meet the following requirements:
    > Must have completed unit standard 11510 or equivalent in terms of RPL;
    AND
    > Must have completed this Qualification or be competent in the Exit Level Outcomes of this Qualification;
    OR
    > Must have completed a related NQF Level 5 Qualification. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
  • Must be competent and have practical experience in the Exit Level Outcomes of this Qualification;
    OR
  • Must have completed unit standard 11510 or equivalent in terms of RPL;
    AND
  • Have subject matter expertise in the field of close protection;
    AND
  • Be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA;
    AND
  • Must have two years practical evidenced operational experience within the field of close protection. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    Learners who do not have a formal licence issued by an authorized licensing body will not be able to prove certain competencies related to driving of light vehicles, as they are not allowed access to public roads according to legal prescripts.

    The learner should exhibit the physical attributes necessary to conduct close protection activities. 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  123510  Apply tactical knowledge in the use of firearms  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  123513  Demonstrate tactical proficiency with a handgun  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  123515  Handle and use a handgun for business purposes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  7854  Provide First Aid  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  115311  Apply advanced driving skills / techniques in defensive and offensive situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244330  Compile a threat and risk assessment for a close protection operation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120486  Demonstrate physical defensive restraining techniques  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  244319  Provide close protection to designated persons whilst in transit  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  244327  Provide pedestrian escort to designated persons within a close protection environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  244334  Provide protection to designated persons whilst embussing or debussing  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  244317  Provide static protection to designated persons.  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Fundamental  120476  Adhere to professional conduct and organisational ethics  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  117449  Apply the general principles of criminal law to the investigation of crime  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  114871  Know and apply diplomatic protocols and etiquette  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  376480  Provide first aid as an advanced first responder  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  242824  Apply leadership concepts in a work context  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  242679  Apply technical knowledge and skill in emergency planning  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  242830  Conduct a security threat assessment in a defined operational area  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  244335  Conduct security at an event  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123518  Demonstrate tactical proficiency with a self-loading rifle or carbine  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123512  Demonstrate tactical proficiency with a shotgun  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123519  Handle and use a manually operated rifle or carbine for business purposes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123511  Handle and use a self loading rifle or carbine for business  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123514  Handle and use a shotgun for business purposes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  11513  Operate effectively within a specified control room environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04  15 
    Elective  115313  Prepare officials and individuals to survive a hostage incident  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123516  Supervise shooting exercises  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  377201  Apply advanced driving skills: defensive driving  Level 5  NQF Level 05 
    Elective  377220  Apply advanced driving skills: offensive driving  Level 5  NQF Level 05 
    Elective  120303  Apply principles of risk management  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  9407  Communicate with clients and discuss work  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15096  Demonstrate an understanding of stress in order to apply strategies to achieve optimal stress levels in personal and work situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120477  Demonstrate tactical and street survival techniques  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  119034  Develop an incident management plan  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  117469  Identify and explain explosives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  9224  Implement policies regarding HIV/AIDS in the workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  114226  Interpret and manage conflicts within the workplace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  113810  Interpret the principles contained in basic South African law as entrenched in the constitution and the Bill of Rights  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  115790  Write and present for a wide range of purposes, audiences and contexts  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. EKHURHULENI SHOOTING AND TRAINING ACADEMY 
    2. Hadassah Security Consultants Cc 
    3. HJN TRAINING CC Pretoria 
    4. IPELENG RISK MANAGEMENT SERVICES PTY LTD 
    5. Zenzele Training School Cc 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.