SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Advanced Certificate: Medical Rescue Technology 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
64229  Advanced Certificate: Medical Rescue Technology 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Emergency Care Practitioners 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
HPCSA - Health Professions Council of South Africa  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Advanced Certificate  Field 09 - Health Sciences and Social Services  Curative Health 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  138  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  Regular-ELOAC 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This Qualification is intended to develop a learner competent in the knowledge, attitudes, insights and skills required for the emergency medical rescue profession.

The qualifying learner will be able to competently apply an integration of theoretical principles, proven techniques, practical experience, and appropriate management and analytical skills in order to provide medical rescue services to all sectors of the community. The competent practitioner is expected to maintain personal health and physical fitness at all times when practising as a medical rescue technologist.

Successful completion of this Qualification will entitle the leaner to register with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) as a Medical Rescue Technician.

Rationale:

This Qualification is designed to produce medical rescue technicians who are able to function on a management and operational level within the emergency medical rescue environment. The Qualification will develop cognitive, technological capabilities and skills necessary for management of urban, rural and wilderness rescue incidents. Graduates will practice primarily within the South Africa Emergency Services and Paramilitary environments. This Qualification also aims to promote an understanding of the multi-disciplinary approach to effective, efficient patient care with the patient's needs being central to the rescue operation.

The Qualification is also designed to enable learners to pursue further personal, and professional development; and to promote life-long learning. 

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
  • National Certificate: Emergency Care Technology, NQF Level 5, or recognised equivalent.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This qualification may be achieved in whole or in part through the process of recognition of prior learning at the request of the learner and the discretion of the education and training institution and in agreement with the relevant ETQA or ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding in place with the relevant ETQA .

    Learners may provide evidence of prior learning for which they may receive credit towards the qualification by means of portfolios or other forms of appropriate evidence such as verified accounts of previous relevant work done and relevant and certified performance records.

    Access to the Qualification:
  • Learners accessing this Qualification will be expected to have an Emergency Care qualification or a recognised equivalent qualification at least at NQF level 5. Learners are also expected to have existing current learner Registration with the Health Professions Council of South Africa in the field of Emergency Care. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    In order to be credited with this qualification, learners are required to achieve the following:

    Fundamental component:
  • All the credits in the Fundamental component - totalling 21 credits - are compulsory.

    Core component:
  • All the credits in the Core component - totalling 112 credits - are compulsory.

    Elective Component:
  • Credits in the Elective component - totalling a minimum of 5 credits - are required to complete this Qualification.

    Notional hours will include both theoretical and clinical competencies as required by the Professional Board for Emergency Care Practitioners. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Demonstrate the personal attributes required for effective incident management (21 credits).

    2. Manage and conduct high angle rescue operations in both structural and wilderness environments (20 credits).
    Range:
  • Knowledge and understanding of high angle rescue includes but is not limited to: theoretical principles of physics with reference to forces, vectors, friction and energy relationships applicable to the high angle rescue;
  • Managing and conducting roles include but are not limited to: team leader, medical emergency technician, rigger and safety officer.

    3. Manage the effective rescue of patients involved in vehicle accidents and/or machinery entrapment (14 credits).
    Range: Knowledge of vehicles includes but is not limited to the anatomy and design of light motor vehicles, trucks, busses, articulated carriers, trains and aircraft.

    4. Manage and conduct search and rescue activities associated with structural fire and or low visibility environments (12 credits).

    5. Participate in search and rescue activities utilising rotor-winged aircraft (6 credits)

    6. Manage and conduct wilderness search and rescue operations (12 credits).
    Range of wilderness environments include but are not limited to: desert, mountain, forest, swamp, bushveld.

    7. Manage and conduct the rescue of patients from fresh water environments (12 credits).
  • Range of fresh water environments includes but is not limited to: rivers, weirs, dams and/or lakes, swift-flowing water, white water;
  • Range of equipment includes but is not limited to: motorised launches, inflatables, rowing boats, boats with outboard motors, zip lines, high lines, tows for disabled craft.

    8. Manage and conduct confined space search and rescue activities (36 credits).
    Range: Confined space includes but is not limited to, inner-city areas, trenches, collapsed structures and their sites, hazardous material spillage/contamination sites.

    9. Elective One: Provide supportive counselling to trauma victim/s (5 credits).
    Note: Actual demonstrations should be in the form of role-play or simulation to protect client confidentiality.

    10. Elective Two: Carry out a research project (5 credits).

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes (CCFOs):
  • Identifying and solving problems using critical and creative thinking is demonstrated in the assessment and treatment of patients.
  • Working effectively with others as a member of the team, group, organisation and community is demonstrated within the context of providing emergency care and supporting other services.
  • Organizing and managing self and own activities responsibly and effectively is demonstrated in the preparation and provision of emergency care.
  • Collecting, analyzing, organizing and critically evaluating information is demonstrated in the assessment and treatment of patients.
  • Communicating effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language skills in the modes of oral and or written presentation is demonstrated through reports and the handover of patients to other services.
  • Demonstrating effective use of science and technology is evidenced in all activities related to emergency care and rescue.
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognising that the problem solving contexts do not exist in isolation is evidenced throughout the processes and procedures related to medical rescue technology. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 All communication is professional, effective, clear, direct and appropriate to the medium of communication, including electronic media and terminology is consistent with profession usage.
    1.2 All interactions promote human dignity and are undertaken with due sensitivity in line with the Codes of Ethics of the HPCSA and professional associations.
    Range: Ethnic, cultural, linguistic, religious and gender diversity; ethical principles of beneficence, autonomy and justice, truth telling, promise keeping and confidentiality.
    1.3 Comprehensive explanation is provided of the legal framework within which a medical emergency service provider and/or practitioner operates.
    1.4 The need for and importance of mental and physical health and wellness, including swimming proficiency, by the emergency care provider is comprehensively discussed, with particular reference to the impact on job effectiveness.
    1.5 Suitable methods for achieving and maintaining operational fitness are described and demonstrated in terms of lifestyle, diet, exercise techniques, rest and sleep and stress management.
    1.6 Methods for maintaining personal safety are applied when dealing with relevant risk and scene assessment, decision making and option taking.
    Range: Methods include but are not limited to, effective use of emergency service equipment and vehicles, emergency response driving, application of operational routines.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 The relevant health and safety legislative framework governing working at heights is explained.
    2.2 High Angle incidents and/or scenarios are critically analysed and plans of action are synthesised in order to access, treat and remove patients in a high angle rescue environment.
    2.3 The action plans are put into operation bearing in mind and explaining the dangers and effects of rescuer fatigue on the efficiency of a high angle rescue operation.
    2.4 The use of high angle equipment is explained and its use explained.
    Range of equipment use includes but is not limited to: Types, functions, construction, inspection, preparation, usage, storage and maintenance.
    2.5 The broad principles of patient packaging are described in terms of securing the patient, the roles of stretcher bearers and/or patient attendants and equipment.
    Range of equipment includes but is not limited to: stretchers, mechanical hoists, high lines, carriage ways.
    2.6 The ability to plan, manage and lead-climb a route and place anchors and/or other protective devices is demonstrated and the safety precautions are simultaneously explained.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 Incidents and or scenarios involving patient entrapment relating to vehicles or industrial environments are critically analysed and plans of action for rescue are synthesised.
    3.2 Action plans are put into operation in order to rescue patients trapped in vehicle and/or industrial environments.
    3.3 The principles of scene safety are described and the support services required and their respective activation procedures are explained.
    3.4 The protective gear required for the specific scene is described in terms of function.
    3.5 The selection for use and maintenance of all types of tools used in entrapment rescue are described.
    3.6 The dangers associated with specialised vehicles are discussed in terms of the special precautions, extra equipment and special support services which could be required.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:

    4.1 Incidents and/or scenarios of fires and low visibility environments are critically analysed and effective plans of action for search and/or rescue are synthesised.
    4.2 Action plans are put into operation in order to rescue patients from a structural fire and/or low visibility environment.
    4.3 Primary fire responder and professional fire fighting equipment is selected for use and the reason for choice is discussed in terms of the principles of fire extinguishment.
    4.4 The laws governing forced entry are explained and forced entry techniques are described and demonstrated.
    4.5 Team search techniques and patterns for employing one or more teams are explained in terms of lost persons' behaviour patterns.
    4.6 Emergency ventilation procedures for patient evacuation methods are explained and demonstrated.
    4.7 The need for a medical post within safe distance of the disaster site to accommodate casualty evacuees is explained and the establishment thereof organised.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:

    5.1 Incidents and or scenarios are critically analysed and plans of action for high line rescue are synthesised.
    5.2 Action plans are put into operation in order to access, treat and remove patients who require high line rescue.
    5.3 The anatomy of a rotor-winged aircraft is described and the dangers associated with working in and around rotor-winged aircraft are explained.
    5.4 Communication between the rescuer and the aircraft crew is demonstrated and/or described.
    Range of communication: Radio and hand/signing.
    5.5 The roles and functions of the various rescue team members are identified and described.
    5.6 Patients are packaged, secured, hoisted and cared for during aviation rescue operations according to the operational protocol for rotor-winged aircraft.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 6:

    6.1 Incidents which may require wilderness search and rescue are critically analysed in terms of available data to plan put into operation management strategies to locate lost persons.
    Range: Operational tools include, but are not limited to, topographical maps, aerial photographs, navigational instruments, camp sites for rescuers, principles of search management.
    6.2 Dangers and challenges associated with wilderness search and rescue activities are contextualised and explained.
    6.3 Role players and resources involved in wilderness search and rescue are identified, and their various roles, functions and mechanism of call-out, described.
    6.4 The requirements for survival in a wilderness area are discussed in terms of navigation principles, sustenance and medical supplies and communication.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 7:

    7.1 Water rescue incidents and/or scenarios are critically analysed and a plan of action is synthesised.
    7.2 The action plan is put into operation to access, treat and remove patients from the fresh water rescue environment.
    7.3 Items of aquatic rescue equipment are assembled, checked and utilised according to the situation.
    7.4 The common causes for drowning in rivers and dams are discussed and the appropriate method for approaching, subduing and towing a patient in the water is described and demonstrated.
    7.5 The dangers associated with river and swift moving water rescue are explained and methods of communication on bodies of water are described and demonstrated.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 8:

    8.1 Incidents and/or scenarios are critically analysed and plans of action specific to the type of rescue required are synthesised.
    8.2 Action plans are put into operation to access, treat and remove patients from the incident environment.
    8.3 Hazards are contextualised in terms of the specific incident scene and mitigating actions are explained.
    Range of Hazards include but are not limited to: Hazardous materials: transportation media, exposure effects on humans and environment, noxious gasses, claustrophobia of victims and rescuers, soil types, water seepage, instability of surrounding structure, pressure of forces affecting structures (including ground), fire, ruptured electrical supply lines, water and gas mains.
    8.4 Personal protective clothing and equipment, such as respiratory and/or ventilation aids, patient location equipment, is contextualised and described in terms of function.
    8.5 The monitoring systems of and immediate concerns for possible secondary threatening events are contextualised and described in terms of prevention and/or mitigation thereof.
    8.6 The various roles of rescue team members, including support services and the special communication systems required, are contextualised and described in terms of the incident scene.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 9:

    9.1 The need for counselling immediately following a traumatic event is explained.
    9.2 The counselling process is described in terms of the ethics, strengths and limitations at lay level.
    9.3 The impact of a traumatic event on day-to-day functioning of a victim is explained.
    9.4 Supportive counselling skills are demonstrated and interventions are selected which are applicable to the type of traumatic event.
    9.5 Principles of self-care are utilised or applied to prevent burnout or secondary traumatisation in a selected context
    Range of selected contexts includes but is not limited to: counsellor, victim.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 10:

    10.1 Plan and design the proposed project.
    10.2 Select an area/topic for research relevant to the current course material.
    10.3 Select and apply an appropriate research methodology.
    10.4 Carry out the research project according to the plan.
    10.5 Collate the data and produce a report.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Integrated assessment takes the form of an appropriate variety of assessment methods, for example: written and oral examinations, problem solving assignments, projects presentations, case studies, portfolios, log books, clinical reports and objectively structured clinical examination (OSCE), reflective practice journals and simulated medical and rescue scenarios.

    Formative Assessment:

    Learning and assessment are integrated. The scheme of work includes tests and assignments, practical work and competency evaluation of practical skills. The process is continuous and focuses on smaller sections of the work in limited number of outcomes.

    Summative Assessment:

    Summative assessments evaluate the learners' abilities to manage and integrate a larger body of knowledge and to achieve the stated outcomes. The summative assessment also focuses on the learners' ability to integrate knowledge and skills in the particular area of specialisation. Summative assessments include theory and practical assessments. 

    INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    This Qualification was compared to qualifications from the United States of America (USA), Senegal, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the United Kingdom.

    The USA has been a world leader in establishing such standards since The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) assumed responsibility for the development of training courses that are responsive to the standards established by the Highway Safety Act of 1966 (amended). These training courses are designed to provide national guidelines for training. NHTSA`s intention is that they be of the highest quality and be maintained in a current and up-to-date status from the point of view of both technical content and instructional strategy. The Emergency Medical Technologist (EMT) - Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum represents the highest level of education in Emergency Management Services (EMS) pre-hospital training.

    This Qualification was compared with the United States of America's (USA) National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Urban Search and Rescue Technician qualifications for fire fighters and emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Several vocational, technical, and Junior colleges offer a 2 year Associate's of Applied Science Degree, Emergency Management Services (AAS, EMS) requiring approximately 70-75 semester hours of study. These programs prepare students for certification as a paramedic and further provide them with the background to manage and supervise emergency medical first responder units in support of fire departments, ambulance companies and other first responder agencies. In addition to EMT courses students also take courses such as:
  • English Composition.
  • Modern College Mathematics or Introduction to College Algebra and Trigonometry.
  • Principles of Ethics.
  • On Being a Supervisor.
  • Anatomy and Physiology for Paramedics.
  • Computing Concepts & Applications.
  • Introduction to Human Communication.
  • Managing the Emergency Medical Service Paramedic.
  • Fire Education and Public Relations.

    Senegal has no on-going Rescue Technician or EMT training programme remotely close to the South African Qualification. Medical training for ambulance personnel is similar to EMT standards, but there are no national standards for training throughout the country. Individuals in communities away from the major cities such as Dakar receive very little training.

    The UAE has a limited number of medics trained to EMT standards but very little technical rescue training. Such skills and training are received primarily outside the country. Different governmental agencies contract with companies from different countries such as the USA, Germany, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and Saudi Arabia to come in to conduct training. Each contractor brings in standards from own country of origin. There are no national level standards for paramedic training in the country. Additionally, there are no standards for maintaining medical competency or life time development.

    Emergency Medical Services in the UK have taken a decision to stop short course training and are currently developing similar higher education qualifications for pre-hospital practitioners. This decision was taken after reviewing the South African higher education model.

    Conclusion:

    This Advanced Certificate compares favourably with world's best practice as represented by the qualifications of the USA while leading the way on the African continent for establishing standards for the equivalent of a Rescue Technician who will ensure that patient needs are prioritised and seen as central to the entire rescue operation. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
  • This Qualification articulates horizontally with the ND: Fire Service Technology, Level 6.
  • This Qualification articulates vertically with the ND: Disaster Management, Level 8. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Moderators must be registered as moderators with the relevant ETQA or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Moderators must be in possession of a qualification at a minimum of one level above that of this Qualification in a relevant field of study and must have experience in medical rescue technology practice.
  • Moderators must be used in a manner that fits into the quality management system of the provider and in accordance with the institutional tuition and assessment policies. This must also apply to the appointment of outside persons.
  • Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to moderation principles and procedures. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
  • Assessors must be registered as assessors with the relevant ETQA or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessors must be in possession of a qualification at a minimum of one level above that of this Qualification in a relevant field of study and must have experience in medical rescue technology practice.
  • Assessors must be used in a manner that fits into the quality management system of the provider and in accordance with the institutional tuition and assessment policies. This must also apply to the appointment of outside persons.
  • Providers offering learning towards this qualification must be accredited by the relevant ETQA or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA. In particular, accreditation is dependent on providers demonstrating that their curriculum and learning programmes meet the requirements specified by the Health Professions Council of South Africa. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    This qualification is not based on Unit Standards. 

    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.