SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Disaster Risk Management 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
58012  National Certificate: Disaster Risk Management 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Generic Management 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CHE - Council on Higher Education  HEQSF - Higher Education Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 03 - Business, Commerce and Management Studies  Generic Management 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  170  Level 7  NQF Level 07  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2021-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2022-06-30   2025-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This qualification will enable Disaster Risk Management practitioners to improve professionalism and enhance the quality and effectiveness of services. A learner acquiring this qualification will be able to apply effective Disaster risk reduction principles (including prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, recovery, relief, rehabilitation, reconstruction) within a developmental context and functional field. Disaster Risk Management practitioners operate in a complex, highly stressful environment that demands application of acquired competencies. This qualification therefore reflects the need and demand within the Disaster Risk Management environment for professionals who will be able to perform operational, managerial and leadership functions involving complex skills and attributes, procedures and legislation contextualised within the Disaster Risk Management environment.

This qualification includes broader and specialized competencies in terms of co-ordination, planning, project management, various modes of communication, information management, and financial management. Learners will also be able to utilise research in the application of the risk identification and reduction and apply national and international best practices within specific functional fields. In addition, the learner will be able to:
  • Establish integrated institutional capacity in a particular functional area to enable the effective implementation of Disaster Risk Management policy, legislation and practices.
  • Apply consistent approaches to assess and monitor Disaster risks to inform Disaster Risk Management planning and Disaster risk reduction undertaken by all stakeholders and role-players.
  • Plan and implement integrated Disaster Risk Management plans and risk reduction programmes in accordance with approved policies and practices by Disaster Risk Management stakeholders and role-players.
  • Plan and implement effective and appropriate Disaster response and recovery.
  • Manage self, physical and information resources through effective organisational relations and practices to achieve organisational objectives.

    Rationale:

    As a result of escalating costs of Disasters, countries are geared to growing and improving Disaster Risk Management competencies. Disaster Risk Management is therefore a critical skill in South Africa, Southern Africa Developing Countries and the rest of the world. This qualification will be able to serve as a means through which people in various spheres of government, organs of state, parastatals, all relevant sectors including the private sector and volunteers, could develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes required to ensure the effective implementation of Disaster Risk Management related legislation.

    This qualification contributes to meeting legislative requirements relating to the implementation of the Disaster Management Framework that requires the establishment of centres with Disaster Risk Management practitioners as function specific personnel in all spheres of government, sectors, organs of state, focal points in the private sector; and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The qualification will contribute to ensuring that local, national, provincial and municipal Disaster Risk Management practitioners in centres will be able to respond to Disasters or the lead of a Disaster by utilising an inter-sectoral, co-ordinated, integrated and multi-disciplinary approach with a cross-discipline focus. Disaster Risk Management activities involve stakeholders that have responsibilities in other sectors and disciplines so the qualification has a wide appeal.

    This qualification is for learners who are pursuing a career within the Disaster Risk Management discipline and is one of two in a learning pathway that has been created. It provides learners with opportunities for professional development and career advancement within the broader Disaster Risk Management environment. The typical learner for this qualification will come from all municipal services; government departments, disciplines and services; non-governmental organisations (NGOs), community based organisations (CBOs), faith-based organisations (FBOs); international organisations; private sector; communities; politicians; Commerce and industry including organised labour; schools. Government departments and offices that would be interested in using standards in the DRM discipline are Agriculture and Land Affairs, Defence, Education, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Foreign Affairs, Health, Home Affairs, Housing, Minerals and Energy, National Treasury, Provincial and Local Government, Public Works, Safety and Security, Social Development, The Presidency, Transport, Water Affairs and Forestry. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that learners are competent in:
  • Communication at NQF Level 5.
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4.
  • Computer Literacy at NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of Prior Learning

    The structure of this unit standards-based qualification makes the Recognition of Prior Learning possible. This qualification may therefore be achieved in part or completely through the recognition of prior learning, which includes formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience. The learner should be thoroughly briefed on the mechanism to be used and support and guidance should be provided. Care should be taken that the mechanism used provides the learner with an opportunity to demonstrate competence and is not so onerous as to prevent learners from taking up the RPL option towards gaining a qualification.

    If the learner is able to demonstrate competence in the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes implicit in this qualification the appropriate credits should be assigned to the learner. Recognition of Prior Learning will be done by means of Integrated Assessment as mentioned above.

    This Recognition of Prior Learning may allow:
  • Accelerated access to further learning at this or higher levels on the NQF.
  • Gaining of credits towards a unit standard.
  • Obtaining of this Qualification in part or in whole.

    Access to the qualification
  • Access is open, however it is advisable for learners to have completed an under-graduate degree in any Disaster Risk Management related field.
  • Knowledge of relevant Emergency Management Services legislation is recommended. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
  • Fundamental Components: All 60 unit standards credits are compulsory.
  • Core Component: All 90 unit standards credits are compulsory.
  • Elective Component: A minimum of 20 unit standards credits are to be chosen.
  • The Total credits for this Qualification is 170. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Develop integrated institutional capacity in a particular functional area to enable the effective implementation of Disaster Risk Management policy, legislation and practices.
    2. Apply consistent approaches to assess and monitor disaster risks to inform Disaster Risk Management planning and disaster risk reduction undertaken by all stakeholders and role-players.
    3. Plan and implement integrated Disaster Risk Management plans and risk reduction programmes in accordance with approved policies and practices by Disaster Risk Management stakeholders and role-players.
    4. Plan and implement effective and appropriate disaster response and recovery.
    5. Manage self, physical and information resources through effective organisational relations and practices to achieve organisational objectives. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    1.
  • The development and adoption of integrated Disaster Risk Management policies, systems and practices are supported and managed in accordance with national and international guidelines.
  • Integrated institutional capacity for Disaster Risk Management is developed in terms of statutory requirements for integrated Disaster Risk Management policies, systems and practices.
  • Comprehensive Disaster Risk Management knowledge is utilised to advise on the process and implementation of integrated Disaster Risk Management policies and systems.

    2.
  • Disaster risk analysis is conducted to inform Disaster Risk Management planning and Disaster risk reduction.
  • Disaster risks are evaluated utilising integrated and multidisciplinary approaches.
  • Risk reduction initiatives are constantly monitored and reviewed for improved risk assessment.

    3.
  • Integrated Disaster Risk Management plans and strategies are developed for effective Disaster risk reduction.
  • Co-ordinated Disaster risk reduction interventions are implemented in accordance with statutory imperatives.
  • Integrated Disaster Risk Management plans and strategies are evaluated against pre-determined objectives to ascertain its effectiveness.

    4.
  • Disaster response and recovery programme and activities are interpreted and strategically integrated as policy outputs towards effective Disaster Risk Management.
  • Comprehensive technical Disaster impact assessments are conducted for effective and appropriate Disaster response and recovery.
  • Integrated rehabilitation and reconstruction interventions are planned, developed and implemented to address the set objectives.

    5.
  • Communication techniques are applied and managed to optimise the impact and effectiveness of quality service delivery.
  • The utilisation of information management and communication systems are optimised to improve service delivery.
  • Work processes are implemented to promote effective performance thereby achieving set goals and objectives and ensuring quality service delivery.
  • Conflict is managed through provision of quality customer service and service delivery standards.
  • Professional values and ethics are demonstrated in the execution of daily functions.
  • Professional conduct is demonstrated through optimising stress levels in personal and work situations.

    Integrated Assessment
  • Assessment practices must be open, transparent, fair, valid, and reliable and ensure that no learner is disadvantaged in any way whatsoever, so that an integrated approach to assessment is incorporated into the qualification.
  • Learning, teaching and assessment are inextricably interwoven. Whenever possible, the assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values shown in the unit standards should be integrated.
  • Assessment of communication and mathematical literacy should be integrated as far as possible with other aspects and should use practical administration contexts wherever possible. A variety of methods must be used in assessment and tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working or will work. Where it is not possible to assess the learner in the workplace or on-the-job, simulations, case studies, role-plays and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.
  • The term `Integrated Assessment` implies that theoretical and practical components should be assessed together. During integrated assessments, the assessor should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment tools methods and assess combinations of practical, applied, foundational and reflective competencies.
  • Assessors must assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience.
  • Assessment should ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes are evaluated in an integrated manner. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The choice of selected countries in comparative information

    Disaster Risk Management has enjoyed heightened attention in almost every country on the globe. Major catastrophic events such as 9/11, the December 2004 Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, sever flooding in Europe and the on-going food insecurity crisis in much of the developing world heightened the focus of policy makers on issues of Disaster risk. In order to ensure a valid international comparability study three categories of counties were identified: developed countries (United States of America, Australia and Germany); developing countries outside of Africa (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Indonesia and Bangladesh); and African countries (Mozambique, Nigeria, Kenya and Tanzania).

    The above-mentioned countries were selected on the grounds of their similar Disaster risk profile, their progress made in terms of Disaster Risk Management education and training, and their specific multi-sectoral focus on Disaster Risk Management. The inherent multi-disciplinary nature of Disaster Risk Management makes international comparability challenging because of the various facets, which such a qualification can cover. In many of the instances in the African countries, Disaster Risk Management takes on the format of high-impact short courses with very limited long-term learning taking place. In some of the developing countries outside of Africa more long-term qualifications in Disaster Risk Management are offered which allow for a more thorough comparison. The most useful comparison that could be made was with the developed countries, which have well-developed programmes in Disaster Risk Management.

    African countries:

    Mozambique

    The National Institutive for Disaster Management (INGC) focuses on the following areas in Disaster Risk Management:
  • Institutional strengthening and capacity-building.
  • Public awareness, training, and sensitization.
  • Risk mapping and vulnerability analysis.

    Their programmes focus on:
  • Preparation of a national Disaster plan.
  • Establishment of a fund to support local and community Disaster reduction initiatives.
  • Risk mapping of all vulnerable areas.
  • Training of personnel of agencies involved in Disaster management.
  • Development of a national early warning system for Disasters.
  • Campaign on raising awareness of national Disaster reduction efforts.
  • Establishment of a Disaster Information and Communications Centre.

    This specific focus is in line with the current risk profile of the country. The developmental nature of the Mozambique government necessitates an emphasis on institutional capacity, as is the case in South Africa where new structures must be established.

    Nigeria

    Nigeria does not have a specific focus on Disaster Risk Management through a dedicated programme but aims to incorporate issues of Disaster management into current programmes and curriculum. To this end Disaster management is found to be part of studies in environmental management, engineering studies, rural development, agricultural studies, HIV/AIDS, security studies, and emergency management. Disaster Risk Management is further addressed through various colleges and public educational facilities throughout the country in the form of specific short courses such as:
  • Emergency preparedness.
  • Refugee studies/humanitarian aid.
  • Disaster preparedness and response.
  • Disaster rehabilitation.
  • Internally displaced persons.
  • Facilities management (oil industry).
  • Occupational Health and Safety.
  • Disaster planning.

    Some universities in Nigeria are working toward the formalisation of a qualification in Disaster Risk Management by 2009.

    Kenya

    Areas in Disaster risk reduction covered by various institutions in Kenya include:
  • Introduction to Disaster management.
  • Logistics.
  • Strategies.
  • Mitigation.
  • Mobilization.
  • Drought and relief.
  • Disaster preparedness.
  • Risks and hazards management.
  • Managing water.
  • Sanitation and hygiene in Disaster and emergency situations.
  • Implementing Sphere standards.
  • Needs assessment in emergencies.
  • Rapid environmental impact assessments in Disasters.
  • Security management.
  • Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS.
  • Training-of-trainers.
  • Managing people and projects.
  • Remote sensing.
  • GIS for Disaster management.

    As with the other African countries the majority of the skills and knowledge transfer occurs through short courses although a number of universities are incorporating Disaster Risk Management into post-graduate qualifications such as public health, sociology, political science and development studies.

    Tanzania

    Tanzania has made significant strides towards implementing new qualifications in Disaster Risk Management. Through the University College of Lands and Architectural Studies (UCLAS) in Dar Es Salaam they offer postgraduate programmes related to Disaster management, Disaster Risk Management, and environmental technology and management (with a specialisation in Disaster management). They focus on the following aspects of Disaster Risk Management:
  • Introduction in Disaster Risk Management.
  • Application of the Humanitarian Charter and Sphere Minimum Standards.
  • Introduction to Disaster planning.
  • Web technology for Disaster management.

    Developing countries outside of Africa

    Most of the information in the developing countries outside of Africa were hard to come by and relates mostly to post-graduate studies.

    Argentina
  • Argentina has a specific focus on Disaster prevention and management. One of their master's degrees dedicated to the subject focuses on Disaster events and their prevention. A clear Disaster Risk Management could not be ascertained.

    India
  • The risk profile in India necessitates a wide focus on issues of Disaster risk. It is noticeable that India has a multitude of short courses relating to Disaster management, which are targeted at both educated and non-educated people. The Disaster Risk Management courses in India have a distinct community-based focus aimed at transfer of critical skills. In most instances Disaster management is integrated into other programmes such as community building and construction, social networks, masonry, community based Disaster management and environmental management.

    In terms of post-graduate studies the following focus areas could be identified:
  • Risk assessment.
  • Emergency planning.
  • Prevention and mitigation.
  • Sustainable development.

    Indonesia
  • After years of conflict in Indonesia it is understandable that Disaster Risk Management is mainly addressed though the peace and conflict resolution courses. In various instances these undergraduate and post-graduate courses have a strong emphasis on peace building with a specialist focus on Disaster Risk Management.

    Bangladesh

    Bangladesh offers diplomas, certificates as well as post- and undergraduate-degrees in Disaster management. Topics covered include:

    Pre-Disaster preparedness:
  • Vulnerability reduction.
  • Relief and rehabilitation.
  • Long term development.

    Developed countries

    United States of America

    The USA offers a variety of different Disaster management and emergency management courses at various levels. In some of their qualifications, Disaster Risk Management forms an integral part of the curriculum and in others forms stand-alone qualifications. Some of the topics covered at undergraduate level include:
  • Emergency and Disaster Theory.
  • Emergency and Disaster Planning and Management.
  • Emergency and Disaster Response, Relief, & Recovery.
  • Economics of Disaster.
  • Case Analysis: Crisis and Disaster.
  • Planning and Preparation.
  • The Roles of Local governments in Recovery Processes.
  • Unmet Needs and Challenges.
  • Resource Management.
  • Mitigation and Planning for Local Governments.
  • Managing Donations and Finances Surrounding Disasters.
  • Tools for Assessment and Structural Capacity.
  • Information Technology and Disasters.
  • Technical Report Writing.
  • Technical Mathematics.
  • Introduction to Computers.
  • Introduction to Emergency Management.
  • Basic Incident command System/NIMS.
  • Characteristics of Hazardous Materials.
  • Emergency Planning.
  • Exercise Design and Evaluation.
  • Developing & Managing Volunteer Recourses.
  • Disaster Site Worker.
  • Responder Awareness/Operations.
  • Terrorism.
  • Living in a Hazardous Environment.
  • Specific Events and Contingency Planning.
  • Principles and Process of Emergency Management.
  • Exercise Design & Evaluation.
  • Emergency Planning.
  • Principles of Emergency Management.
  • Developing Community Resources.
  • Disaster & fatalities Response and Recovery.
  • Hazardous Materials Contingency Planning.
  • Infection Control.
  • Facility Security.
  • Emergency Preparedness.
  • Technology & Emergency Management.
  • Political & Policy Basis of Emergency Management.
  • Principles & Practice of Mitigating Hazards.
  • Social Dimensions of Disasters.
  • Safety & Emergency Administration.
  • Emergency Management: Principles & Application for Tourism and Hospitality & Travel Industries.
  • Terrorism and Emergency Management.
  • Counter-Terrorism and Response.
  • Weapons of Mass Destruction: Political Issues.
  • Hazardous Risk Analysis.
  • Psychology of Terrorism.
  • Domestic Preparedness for Catastrophic Emergencies.
  • Business and Industry Crisis Management, Disaster Recovery & Organizational Continuity.

    At post-graduate level the following topics are covered:
  • Introduction to Organizational Risk and Crises Management in Both Public and Private Enterprise.
  • The Social and Psychological Elements of Workplace Disruption.
  • Public Emergency Management: Structure, Systems, and Goals.
  • System-Wide Compliance, Planning, and Strategy for Emergency and Continuity Management.
  • Financial and Managerial Accounting.
  • Financial Management.
  • Data Analysis and Operations Management.
  • Managing Employees, Professionals and Teams.
  • International Business, Economics and Cultures.
  • Marketing Management.
  • Introduction to Electronic Commerce, Systems, and Web Design.
  • Knowledge Management and Data Analysis.
  • Disaster and Emergency Management.
  • Disaster Management II, Vulnerability and Threat Assessment.
  • Disaster Management III, Incident Command and Response.
  • Disaster Management IV, Business Continuity and Asset Protection.
  • Instructing the Adult Learner.
  • Public Health Microbiology.
  • Public Health Statistics.
  • Advanced Public Health Epidemiology.
  • Air Monitoring and Analytical Methods.
  • Physical Agents.

    Blanchard (2005) lists the following top ten competencies of an emergency manager in the USA:
  • Comprehensive Emergency Management Framework or Philosophy.
  • Leadership and Team-Building.
  • Management.
  • Networking and Co-ordination.
  • Integrated Emergency Management.
  • Emergency Management Functions.
  • Political, Bureaucratic, Social Contexts.
  • Technical Systems and Standards.
  • Social Vulnerability Reduction Approach.
  • Experience.

    Brown lists the following as core skills for emergency managers:
  • Analytical.(creative & critical thinking, problem solving, decision making)
  • Research.(problem identification, design, method selection, data analysis)
  • Application of Technology.(computer hardware & software, geographic information systems, communication)
  • Communication.(written & verbal)
  • Human Resource Management.(personnel administration)
  • Leadership.
  • Fiscal Resource Management.(budgeting systems)
  • General Management.(project, intra- & inter-organizational coordination, work flow, meeting)
  • Planning.(project, strategic)
  • Human Relations.(interpersonal, negotiation & conflict resolution, diplomacy)

    Australia

    Australia is by far the most advanced country in terms of offering structured qualifications relating to Disaster Risk Management in a multi-disciplinary environment. Disaster Risk Management can be found in any of the following nationally registered qualifications:
  • Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management.
    > Relationship management in an emergency management context.
    > Current issues and trends in emergency management.
    > Research methods.
    > Research project.
  • Advanced Diploma of Public Safety.(Emergency Management)
  • Certificate II in Public Safety.(Firefighting and Emergency Operations)
  • Certificate III in Mine Emergency Response and Rescue Qualification.
  • Public Safety.(Firefighting and Emergency Operations)
  • Certificate IV in Basic Emergency Care Qualification.
  • Certificate IV in Veterinary Nursing.(Critical Care and Emergency)
  • Diploma of Veterinary Nursing.(Emergency and Critical Care)
  • Contribute to an emergency Risk Management process.
  • Facilitate Emergency risk assessment.
  • Determine Treatment Options.(Emergency Risk Management)
  • Exercise Management.
  • Emergency Co-ordination Centre Management.(ECC/EOC)
  • Emergency Planning.
  • Recovery Management Program.(various short courses)
  • Exercise Management Train-the-Trainer.
  • Civil Defence in the 21st Century.
  • Emergency Management for Local Government.
  • Risk Based Land Use Planning.
  • Health Aspects of Chemical, Biological and Radiological Incidents.
  • Disaster Medicine.
  • Emergency Management for Public Health Professionals.
  • Introduction to Emergency Risk Management.
  • Business Continuity Management.

    The state and territory emergency services sector specific competency standards indicate the following units:
  • Undertake storm and water damage operations.
  • Work in an emergency operations centre.
  • Undertake flood and inland waterways rescue boat operations.
  • Establish and maintain a communications network.
  • Marshall aircraft.
  • Manage emergency operations.
  • Administer a local unit.

    Traces of the above standards can be found in each of the mentioned qualifications.

    Germany

    The focus within Germany is limited to post-graduate studies. From the research it seems that Germany has a distinct focus on humanitarian relief with limited focus on pure Disaster Risk Management matters. Some of the aspects covered at master level include:

    Masters in Humanitarian Relief:
  • Geopolitics.
  • Anthropology.
  • International Law.
  • Medicine and Public.
  • Health Management.

    Masters in Disaster Management
  • Basics of Disaster management.
  • Public health.
  • Disaster psychology.
  • Development and resources.
  • Risk analysis and communication.
  • Advanced Disaster Management.
  • Politics, society and the environment.
  • Specialist risks.
  • Project Management.

    Which countries embody best practice
  • From the analysis it is clear that Australia is by far employing best practices. All of the courses listed adhere to some form of unit standard and all qualifications are accredited nationally. In the case of the USA, it is clear that the field is more fragmented but all of the assessed qualifications adhere to the national standard and are also graduate certificates. The USA in contrast with Australia has a more distinct focus on Disaster and emergency response rather than Disaster Risk Management.


    How best practice has been incorporated into the certificate
  • In incorporating best practice into the certificate, regard has been taken of the multi-disciplinary and multi-sectoral focus of Disaster Risk Management in various countries. A cross-correlation of these practices ensured that the most crucial and most relevant aspects to the South African environment have been incorporated. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification articulates with horizontally the following registered learning programmes:
  • Bachelor of Arts Honours: Police Science Level 7.
  • Bachelor of Technology: Policing Level 7.
  • National Certificate in Generic Management Level 7.
  • Bachelor of Science Level 7.
  • Bachelor of Construction Management Level 7.
  • National diploma in Joint and Multi-National Operations Level 7.
  • Advanced Certificate: Environmental Education, Training and Development Practice Level 7.

    This Qualification articulates vertically with the following registered learning programmes:
  • National Certificate in Generic Management Level 8.
  • Masters of Science Level 8.
  • Masters of Construction Management Level 8.
  • Higher Certificate: Environmental Education, Training and Development Practice Level 8.
  • Higher Certificate: Municipal Financial Management Level 8. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with an appropriate Education, Training, Quality Assurance (ETQA) Body or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA. Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA or by an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA, according to the ETQA`s policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual Unit Standards as well as in the exit level outcomes described in the Qualification. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    For an applicant to register as an assessor, the applicant needs:
  • A relevant tertiary qualification and/or 3 years experience in the relevant field.
  • To be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance Body.
  • This qualification will be assessed by an assessor and moderated by a moderator registered with the relevant accredited ETQA.
  • Assessors should be in possession of a relevant qualification in Disaster Risk Management or related field that is at least one level higher than the level of this qualification. Training providers must be accredited by a relevant ETQA. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  243318  Conduct and monitor disaster risk assessment utilising integrated and multi-disciplinary approaches  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Core  243315  Conduct comprehensive technical disaster impact assessment  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Core  243320  Develop integrated rehabilitation and reconstruction strategies  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Core  243319  Develop strategies and plans for disaster risk reduction  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Core  243317  Facilitate, guide and advise the process of adopting integrated disaster risk management policies and systems  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Core  243314  Interpret and strategically integrate policies into response and recovery programmes and activities  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Fundamental  117438  Inform policy  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6  15 
    Fundamental  117434  Conduct research  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Fundamental  243316  Implement disaster management practices utilising information management and communication systems  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Fundamental  243321  Manage communications for effective disaster risk management practices  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 
    Elective  13097  Advise on the function of financial management  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  16 
    Elective  13071  Apply and evaluate the function of financial management as it relates to the objective of the firm, strategic financial management and financial statement analysis  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7 
    Elective  12436  Develop and manage government communication campaigns  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7 
    Elective  12435  Develop Government communication policies, strategies and processes  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7 
    Elective  12160  Direct, coordinate and conduct research into government communication  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7 
    Elective  12437  Establish, develop and manage media relationships to promote the policies of Government  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7 
    Elective  12974  Provide advice on financial management  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  12 
    Elective  117435  Provide expert evidence in court  Level 7  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L7  15 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.