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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Autotronics 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
78923  National Certificate: Autotronics 
ORIGINATOR ORIGINATING PROVIDER
SGB Manufacturing and Assembly Processes   
QUALITY ASSURING BODY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
MERSETA - Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 06 - Manufacturing, Engineering and Technology  Manufacturing and Assembly 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  132  Level 3  NQF Level 03  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 0695/12  2012-07-01  2015-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2016-06-30   2019-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification replaces: 
Qual ID Qualification Title Pre-2009 NQF Level NQF Level Min Credits Replacement Status
22859  National Certificate: Autotronics  Level 3  NQF Level 03  141  Complete 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This Qualification is for any individual who is, or wishes to be, involved in an autotronics environment. The Qualification contains all the skills, knowledge, values and attitudes required by a learner who needs mainly to be able to perform a range of activities and thereby meet the challenges within a specific autotronics environment. An individual acquiring this Qualification will be able to contribute towards the efficient operation of a number of processes within this sector and at this level as described in the Core component of the qualification.

The Core component covers the following competencies:
  • Diagnosing, testing and repairing conventional automobile charging systems.
  • Diagnosing, testing and repairing conventional automobile starting systems.
  • Servicing and repairing conventional ignition systems.
  • Constructing and testing basic electronic circuits.
  • Tracing and repairing auto electrical circuit faults.
  • Operating and monitoring a lathe.
  • Appling safety, health and environment protection procedures in a process plant.

    These competencies will enable the learner to work in different industries within the diverse autotronics sector.

    The Qualification ensures progression of learning, enabling the learner to perform optimally within the autotronics field of learning and providing access to learning at a higher level within the same or a related sector.

    Rationale:

    This is the second Qualification in a series of four autotronics qualifications that range from NQF Levels 2 to 5. These qualifications constitute a learning pathway that takes the learners from basic/simple competencies in autotronics at NQF Level 2 to high level autotronics competencies at NQF Level 5. Typical learners will be persons who are currently working in an autotronics environment, who have not received any formal recognition for their skills and knowledge or for anyone wishing to follow a career in an autotronics working environment, in a variety of contexts.

    The automobile is subject to ever increasing technological advances. These advances are continuously being incorporated into the electrical systems of automobiles. They represent the integration of mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, electronic and electrical systems and are managed by microelectronic control known as Computer Integrated Auto Management (CIAM) Systems. Consequently, the auto-electrical skills required to maintain such automobiles are changing to incorporate more electronic skills.

    The field of autotronics deals with the installation, diagnosis and repair of CIAM systems. People working in the field of autotronics require specialised technical skills and knowledge and well as highly developed analytical skills to enable them to install, diagnose and repair CIAM systems.

    This series will reflect the skills, knowledge and understanding required to perform effectively in industry, whether in micro, small, medium or large enterprises.

    This qualification forms the basis for further learning in the field of autotronics.

    The autotronics sector falls within the ambit of South Africa's large motor industry. There are huge motor assembly plants in several parts of the country, primarily in the Eastern Cape, Gauteng and Kwa Zulu Natal provinces. There are also many automotive related sectors like the automotive components manufacturing and assembly industries, automotive sales and service sector, repairs (including panel beating and spray painting) industries. It's a sector that employs a large number of people. Companies and/or industries within this sector operate in a global competitive and challenging environment.

    The highly developed autotronics sector is well-established and economically powerful. In terms of transformation in the country, learners will require skills and competencies to gain access to positions within management structures by completing other qualifications and training. It will be in the interest of the country and the sector to ensure that those who operate in the autotronics environment are trained according to this Qualification to improve productivity and efficiency.

    This national Qualification and its related Unit Standards were developed to standardise the accreditation of learning programmes, resulting in improved quality management in terms of programme delivery. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    Learners wishing to study towards this Qualification are assumed to have:
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 2.
  • Communication at NQF Level 2.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This Qualification may be achieved in part (or whole) through the recognition of relevant prior knowledge and/or experience. The learner must be able to demonstrate competence in the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes implicit in this Qualification. As part of the provision of recognition of prior learning providers are required to develop a structured means for the assessment of individual learners against the Unit Standards of the Qualification on a case-by-case basis. A range of assessment tools and techniques during formative and summative assessment procedures should be used which have been jointly decided upon by the learner and the assessor. Such procedures, and the assessment of individual cases, are subject to moderation by independent assessors. The same principles that apply to assessment of this Qualification also apply to recognition of prior learning.

    Learners may provide evidence of prior learning for which they may receive credit towards the Unit Standards and/or the Qualification by means of portfolios or other forms of appropriate evidence as agreed to between the relevant provider and relevant ETQA or ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding in place with the relevant ETQA.

    Recognition of Prior Learning is particularly important, as there are people in the autotronics sector with a variety of skills and competencies of differing quality and scope. It is important that an Recognition of Prior Learning process be available to assist in making sense of existing competencies and skills, and helping to standardise these competencies and skills towards a common standard.

    Access to the Qualification:

    There is an open access to this Qualification. However it is preferable that learners first complete the National Certificate: Autotronics at NQF Level 2 before accessing this qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The Qualification consists of a Fundamental, a Core and an Elective Component.

    To be awarded the Qualification learners are required to obtain a minimum of 132 credits as detailed below.

    Fundamental Component; 36 Credits.

    The Fundamental Component consists of Unit Standards in:
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 3 to the value of 16 Credits.
  • Communication at NQF Level 3 to the value of 20 Credits.

    All Unit Standards in the Fundamental Component are compulsory.

    Core Component:

    The Core Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 74 Credits, all of which are compulsory.

    Elective Component:

    The Elective Component consists of Unit Standards offering a variety of competencies to the learner. Learners are to choose Elective Unit Standards totalling a minimum of 22 credits to attain a minimum of 132 credits for this Qualification. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Test, diagnose repair and/or service conventional automobile electronic systems.
  • Range: Electronic systems include charging, ignition and starting systems.

    2. Construct and test basic electronic circuits.

    3. Trace and repair auto-electrical circuits.

    4. Apply safety, health and environment protection procedures in the workplace.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    Identify and solve problems in which responses display that responsible decisions using critical and creative thinking have been made when:
  • Testing the electronic systems (charging, starting and ignition systems) and diagnosing faults.
  • Interpreting test results.
  • Differentiating between the wiring harnesses on a vehicle.
  • Testing joints.

    Work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation, community to:
  • Contribute to the work group's efforts to maintain cleanliness, safety and quality.
  • Trace faults on auto-electrical circuits on an automobile.

    Organise and manage oneself and one's activities responsively and effectively when:
  • Interpreting circuit diagrams of electronic systems.
  • Performing tests using testing equipment.
  • Servicing systems, where appropriate, using appropriate equipment.
  • Repairing components where applicable (distributors, alternators, starters).
  • Removing, bench-testing, dismantling, reassembling and refitting components.
  • Demonstrating the ability to locate technical information in an auto electrical (autotronics) context.
  • Differentiating between the wiring harnesses on a vehicle.
  • Locating joints and earth points in the various harnesses.
  • Applying the correct procedures for using, storing and looking after tools, test equipment and components.
  • Preparing for safety and environmental inspections in work area.
  • Conducting safety, health and environmental inspections in work area.

    Collect, analyse, organise and critically evaluate information to:
  • Interpret test results and solve problems/faults.
  • Differentiate between the wiring harnesses on a vehicle.
  • Locate joints and earth points in the various harnesses.
  • Compare auto electrical safety devices to technical specifications.
  • Respond to unsafe unacceptable conditions in work area.

    Communicate effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language skills in the modes of oral and/or written presentation to:
  • Prepare report for customer on condition of component.
  • Prepare job-card for notifying the customer.
  • Use common names for components, test equipment, circuits, and the filling in and use of fault reports and requisition forms.

    Use science and technology effectively and critically, showing responsibility towards the environment and the health of others by:
  • Using tools and equipment according to manufacturer's instructions and workplace procedure.

    Demonstrate an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognising that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation to:
  • Engage with faults on the distributor and ignition system.
  • Engage with faults on the alternators and charging system.
  • Relate the use of electronics to other units and equipment. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
  • Diagrams of the systems are interpreted in terms of symbols and components.
  • The theoretical aspects of the systems are discussed to provide the basis for practical application.
  • Components of relevant systems are described, maintained, tested, and serviced according to procedure.
  • The system is tested using appropriate equipment and faults are diagnosed according to procedure.
  • Repairs are performed, where applicable, according to manufacturer's specifications.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
  • The principles of electronics and the operation of basic electronic circuits. are discussed and explained in terms of circuit diagrams and applicable scientific laws.
  • Electronic and related components are described, selected and used for circuit construction as per procedure.
  • Basic electronic circuits are constructed according to circuit diagrams and specifications.
  • Electronic circuits are tested for short circuit and open circuit conditions.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
  • Technical information in an auto electrical (autotronics) context is located and used to remove and test auto electrical devices and components.
  • The wiring harnesses on a vehicle are differentiated in terms of their primary functions and the main circuits they support are identified and described.
  • Auto electrical circuit diagrams and symbols are interpreted in terms of the required operation of the vehicle.
  • Auto electrical components are removed and fitted according to manufacturer's specifications and procedure.
  • Test equipment is select and used to locate faults on auto electrical circuits.
  • Fault finding reports and requisition forms are completed according to procedure.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
  • The responsibilities and liability regarding safety in the workplace are explained in terms of their implications with respect to legislation and company procedures.
  • Safety and environmental inspections in work area are conducted in accordance with workplace procedures and the company safety inspection schedule.
  • Unsafe conditions in work area are dealt with in accordance with workplace procedures and corrective action is taken.
  • Safety, health and environmental documentation is completed according to workplace procedure.

    Integrated Assessment:

    The importance of integrated assessment is to confirm that the learner is able to demonstrate applied competence (practical, foundational and reflexive) and ensure that the purpose of this Qualification is achieved. Both formative and summative assessment methods and strategies are used to ensure that the Exit Level Outcomes and the purpose of the Qualification are achieved through achieving the Unit Standards. Learning, teaching and assessment are inextricably linked.

    Learning and assessment should be integrated and assessment practices must be fair, transparent, valid and reliable. A variety of assessment strategies and approaches must be used. This could include tests, assignments, projects, demonstrations and/or any applicable method. Evidence of the acquisition of competencies must be demonstrated through the Unit Standards, which enhance the integration of theory and practice as deemed appropriate at this level.

    Formative assessment is an on-going process which is used to assess the efficacy of the teaching and learning process. It is used to plan appropriate learning experiences to meet the learner's needs. Formative assessments can include a mix of simulated and actual (real) practice or authentic settings. Feedback from assessment informs both teaching and learning. If the learner has met the assessment criteria of all the Unit Standards then she/he has achieved the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification.

    Summative assessment is concerned with the judgement of the learning in relation to the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification. Such judgement must include integrated assessment(s) which test the learners' ability to integrate the larger body of knowledge, skills and attitudes, which are represented by the Exit Level Outcomes. Summative assessment can take the form of oral, written and practical examinations as agreed to by the relevant ETQA.

    Integrated assessment must be designed to achieve the following:

    An integration of the achievement of the Exit Level Outcomes in a way that reflects a comprehensive approach to learning and shows that the purpose of the Qualification has been achieved;

    Judgement of learner performance to provide evidence of applied competence or capability.

    Assessors and moderators should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment methods. Assessors should assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience.

    Assessment should ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes are assessed. The assessment of the critical cross-field outcomes should be integrated with the assessment of specific outcomes and embedded knowledge. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    This qualification is part of a series of qualifications in the field of Autotronics and was compared to similar qualifications - some outcomes-based - in various countries. The following countries were used to compare this qualification with:
  • United States - The US has one of the most extensive and very highly-developed car manufacturing industries in the world.
  • United Kingdom - The UK also has a highly-developed car manufacturing industry. It also has a number of institutions that offer training courses in the automotive/autotronics field.
  • New Zealand and Australia - They have qualification frameworks similar to the South African NQF; this facilitates comparison.
  • Malaysia - Malaysia works closely with training partners in the automotive industry. These include vehicle brands such as BMW, Mercedes Benz, Nissan, Mazda, Ssangyong, Citroen, Fiat, Honda, Hyundai, Toyota, Audi and Volvo.
  • Japan and Jamaica - While Japan has probably the most sophisticated car manufacturing industry, information on training course and qualifications in autotronics is very sketchy. However, some information on training was found in a cooperative agreement between Japan and Jamaica.
  • Canada - Many institutions offer training in the automotive and autotronics fields.
  • Uganda - While there is very little information on autotronics training in some of the African countries that were surveyed, some information was found on training in Uganda.

    International comparability with the following car manufacturing countries was attempted, with little success, as there was very little or no information available:
  • Japan.
  • Korea.
  • Sweden.
  • France.
  • Germany.
  • Italy.
  • China.

    There was also a paucity of information on training offered by car manufacturers to their employees; in other words, vehicle or company-specific training. Some information is available on training by car manufacturers, namely, BMW and Volvo. This is described later.

    Comparability with the following countries was possible and the comparisons are listed below:

    New Zealand:

    Within New Zealand a qualification such as a certificate usually consists of a number of courses/unit standards. When a unit standard in the certificate qualification is completed, the credits for that unit standards count towards the total credits one requires to complete the qualification. In some qualifications all courses/unit standards are compulsory, while in others there may be elective courses/unit standards.

    Current certificates - similar to this qualification are presented in New Zealand. These include the following:

    National Certificate in Motor Industry (Automotive Electrical Engineering):
  • Demonstrate knowledge of vehicle security systems and their installation.
  • Inspect and test an ignition distributor, and rectify faults.
  • Demonstrate safety precautions on vehicles fitted with air bags and/or seatbelt pre-tensioners.
  • Respond to vehicle and/or machine breakdown.
  • Check a four stroke petrol engine for condition using hand held test equipment.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the operation and testing of automotive alternators and alternator controls.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive electronic fuel injection system operation, and fault diagnosis and repair.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of fuel emissions, and vehicle emission controls.
  • Create and measure automotive series-parallel circuits, and calculate values of power in automotive circuits.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of inductance, capacitors and chokes, and alternating current used in automotive applications.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of electronic components and their application in the automotive industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of integrated electronic devices, multiplexing, and microprocessors in the motor industry.
  • Overhaul starter motors from light vehicles.
  • Diagnose and rectify faults in a contact breaker (CB) ignition system on an engine.
  • Diagnose and rectify faults in a conventional-type electronic ignition system on an engine.
  • Diagnose and rectify faults in light vehicle starting and charging systems.
  • Identify a wiring diagram and translate information to a circuit in the motor and related industries.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of wiring and wiring diagrams used in automotive circuits.
  • Carry out automotive wiring repairs and replace a wiring circuit.
  • Test a vehicle heating and ventilation system.
  • Install electrical accessories in vehicles, and test for and rectify faults.
  • Service multiple battery installations on vehicles, machines, and/or units.

    National Certificate in Motor Industry (Automotive Electrical and Mechanical Engineering) (Level 3) with strands in Electrical and Electronics, Light Vehicle, Motorcycle, Outdoor Power Equipment, and Trailer Boat Systems.

    The following are the many unit standards (core and electives) that are part of the qualification:
  • Identify a wiring diagram and translate information to a circuit in the motor and related industries.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of protecting vehicle electronics in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of testing automotive electrical circuits.
  • Select test equipment and test an automotive electrical circuit.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive electrical principles.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of wiring and wiring diagrams used in automotive circuits.
  • Carry out automotive wiring repairs and replace a wiring circuit.
  • Explain the operation of two and four stroke petrol and diesel engines.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of hand tools and workshop equipment for motor industry applications.
  • Describe automotive starting and charging systems and their operation.
  • Describe automotive ignition systems and their operation.
  • Overhaul starter motors from light vehicles.
  • Diagnose and rectify faults in a conventional-type electronic ignition system on an engine.
  • Diagnose and rectify faults in light vehicle starting and charging systems.
  • Install electrical accessories in vehicles, and test for and rectify faults.
  • Service multiple battery installations on vehicles, machines, and/or units.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the operation and testing of automotive alternators and alternator controls.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive electronic ignition system operation.
  • Protect electronics when servicing or repairing a vehicle or machine in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of vehicle security systems and their installation.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive batteries.
  • Remove and replace motor vehicle lamps in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of windscreen wiper and headlamp cleaning systems.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive lighting requirements and lighting circuit diagnosis.
  • Diagnose and rectify lighting circuit faults on vehicles or machines.
  • Create and measure automotive series-parallel circuits, and calculate values of power in automotive circuits.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of inductance, capacitors and chokes, and alternating current used in automotive applications.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of electronic components and their application in the automotive industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of integrated electronic devices, multiplexing, and microprocessors in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of engine management systems.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of overhauling starter motors from light vehicles.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of overhauling automotive alternators.
  • Test and rectify faults in automotive alternator circuits, and overhaul an automotive alternator.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive air conditioning.
  • Service an automotive battery.
  • Describe automotive starting and charging systems and their operation.
  • Describe automotive ignition systems and their operation.
  • Protect electronics when servicing or repairing a vehicle or machine in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive batteries.
  • Remove and replace motor vehicle lamps in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of automotive lighting systems, and headlamp adjustment.
  • Rectify simple vehicle lighting faults, and adjust vehicle lamps.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of electronic components and their application in the automotive industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of integrated electronic devices, multiplexing, and microprocessors in the motor industry.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of engine management systems.

    Once learners complete this Certificate in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering, they can apply for cross-credits for unit standards from the National Certificate in Motor Industry (Entry Skills) and National Certificate in Mechanical Engineering (Level 2), and become an apprentice working alongside an industry employer, while continuing to study industry-based unit standards. Learners can also choose to continue their qualifications in the Certificate in Applied Technology, specializing in automotive engineering, marine engineering systems, Autotronics, or welding and fabrication.

    In comparing these qualifications to the qualifications in South Africa it is clear that the qualifications in New Zealand cover almost all the competencies of this Qualification, with a few differences. Both these qualifications (New Zealand and South Africa) are streamlined for the needs of that country and therefore the unique differences between the two countries.

    United Kingdom:

    Within the United Kingdom there are various qualifications in the Autotronics environment. The level of qualifications in the United Kingdom is somewhat higher than the South African qualifications.

    Certain aspects of the qualifications offered by the Institute of Motor Industry and City of Guilds in the United Kingdom have been used in benchmarking best practice procedures of some of the unit standards used in this qualification. The NVQ qualifications offered in the UK cover many of the objectives of this series of qualifications, which are at various levels of complexity. The qualifications in the UK are offered as an internship wherein the learner enrols with a college or training centre for the theoretical component, and achieves the practical component in-house. The qualifications are all based on specific levels of performance, and lead to progressive levels of complexity, but are identified as separate qualifications. The learning towards these qualifications is offered through long-term learner-employer relationships, with short-term stints at a training centre.

    Qualification titles in the United Kingdom include:

    City and Guilds:
  • Certificate in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (Auto electrical) Level 3.
  • Certificate in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (Air conditioning and Climate control) Level 3.
  • Diploma in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (Auto electrical) Level 3.

    Edexcel:
  • BTEC National Certificate in Vehicle Repair and Technology (Auto electrical) Level 3.
  • Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (Auto electrical) Level 3.

    IMI:
  • Diploma in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (Auto electrical) Level 3.
  • National Certificate in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (Auto electrical) Level 3.

    Competencies covered within these qualifications include unit standards such as health and safety, customer relations, using tools, repairing, servicing and testing all the elements of electrical systems. The electives include: Carry Out Repairs to Single Electrical Circuits, Install Ancillary Electrical Components, Repair Starting Systems, Repair Electrical Systems, Repair Instruments and Warning Systems, Repair Ignition Systems, Repair Charging, Equipment Implement and Monitor Environmental Regulations in the Automotive Mechanical Industry, Repair/Retrofit Air Conditioning Systems Carry and Soft Soldering (Basic).

    Other qualifications in the United Kingdom were also used to compare this Qualification. These include:
  • Diploma: Vehicle Maintenance and Repair - Auto Electrical Level 3.

    The competencies covered by this diploma include the following competencies and help participants to provide essential knowledge for auto-electricians working on vehicles in all types of garages, dealerships and maintenance depots.
  • Certificate: Refrigerant Handling for Mobile Air Conditioner - Vehicles Level 3.
  • Certificate: Auto Electricians Level 3.

    The competencies covered by this diploma include the following competencies and are aimed at mechanics or electricians and people who want to increase their knowledge and ability in the field of vehicle electrics.

    In comparing these qualifications to the qualifications in South Africa it is clear that there is a significant similarity between the qualifications in the United Kingdom and the South African one, with some differences. Both the qualifications (United Kingdom and South Africa) are streamlined for the needs of that country and therefore the unique differences between the two countries.

    Australia:

    In Australia to become an Automotive Electrician usually requires the completion of a Certificate III Apprenticeship in Automotive Electrical Technology. The length of training varies and involves both on-the-job and off-the-job components. The off-the-job training is provided through Registered Training Organizations to Certificate III level.

    The competencies covered in this certificate include:
  • Work with computer-controlled engine management and other systems.
  • Diagnose, service, and repair faults on electronically controlled vehicle systems.
  • Install electrical equipment and electrically operated accessories Use meters, test instruments and circuit diagrams to find electrical faults.
  • Test, recondition and replace faulty alternators, generators, starter motors, and related items such as voltage regulators and batteries.
  • Repair or replace faulty ignition, electrical wiring, fuses, lamps and switches.

    Certificate III in Automotive Electrical Technology:

    Description:

    The Certificate III in Automotive Electrical Technology provides students with a strong grounding in both the theoretical and practical knowledge required for servicing and repairing motor vehicles, and communication and customer service skills needed to participate in a work environment.

    Course Structure

    Area One - Compulsory (4 Units):
  • Apply safe working practices.
  • Carry out soldering of electrical wiring/circuits.
  • Carry out diagnostic procedures.
  • Implement and monitor environmental regulations in the automotive mechanical industry.

    Area Two - from Technical Inventory (18 Units):
  • Remove and replace electrical/electronic units/assemblies.
  • Service, maintain or replace batteries.
  • Test, service and charge batteries.
  • Carry out repairs to single electrical circuits.
  • Remove, refit and test electrical componentry for normal operation following body repair activities.
  • Install, test and repair low voltage wiring/lighting systems.
  • Install, test and repair electrical security systems/components.
  • Install ancillary electrical components.
  • Repair electrical systems.
  • Service and repair electronically controlled steering systems.
  • Service and repair electronically controlled suspension systems.
  • Repair electronic systems.
  • Service and repair electronic spark ignition engine management systems.
  • Service and repair electronic drive management systems.
  • Inspect, service and repair electronic management, monitoring and tracking systems.
  • Inspect and service engines.
  • Inspect suspension system.
  • Repair suspension systems.

    Area Three - from Retail, Service and Repair or other (6 Units):
  • Repair and replace emission control systems.
  • Repair transmissions (manual).
  • Repair hydraulic braking systems.
  • Repair final drive assemblies.
  • Repair final drive (driveline).
  • Repair steering systems.

    Duration:
  • 52 weeks (20 hours per week).

    To become an automotive electrician, it is necessary to complete an Automotive Electrical Fitting Technology apprenticeship or Certificate I in Automotive (Pre Apprentice Electrical). Another pathway into the occupation is through the traineeship in Automotive (Electrical) which can lead on to the apprenticeship. Apprenticeships and traineeships are structured training programs that are a valuable alternative for those who wish to gain a qualification through employment. Practical experience at work is complemented with off the job training. Australia is currently experiencing a skills shortage and in certain industry areas there is a high demand for qualified trade people. Apprenticeships usually take four years full time to complete and successful completion will lead to a qualification as a tradesperson.

    In comparing these qualifications to the qualifications in South Africa it is clear that many of the competencies in this Qualification are covered in the Australian qualification. The qualifications of both countries are streamlined for the needs of that country and this points to the difference/s between the two countries.

    Malaysia:

    The following qualifications exist in Malaysia and compared with the South African Qualification it is clear that the content is similar to the South African Qualifications. Although it was difficult to determine and compare the levels of these qualifications it is clear that the content and progression are similar as the South African Qualifications.

    Malaysia works closely with partners in the automotive industry to expose students to real-life conditions in the automotive industry. Their training partners include companies involved in the distribution and servicing of vehicle brand such as BMW, Mercedes Benz, Nissan, Mazda, Ssangyong, Citroen, Fiat, Honda, Hyundai, Toyota, Audi and Volvo.

    Certificate: Technical and Management: Automotive.

    This qualification covers the following aspects:
  • Fundamental operating principles
  • Diagnostic and maintenance requirements of modern automotive systems

    In year 1, students are introduced to:
  • Automotive servicing and minor repairs in the area of engines, chassis, electrical and drive train.

    In Year 2, students are:
  • Engaged in troubleshooting mono and complex problems in contemporary vehicle systems
  • Building up a strong understanding of electrics and electronics along the way.

    Students will also pick up essential knowledge and skills in:
  • Customer care.
  • Communication.
  • Basic service shop management.

    Students will be able to immediately adapt to the working environment thanks to the unique concept of closely monitored and extensive on-the-job-training as well as familiarisation with the latest automobile models in the market.

    In comparing these qualifications to the qualification in South Africa it is clear that there are differences between the qualifications and similarities in terms of competencies.

    United States:

    In Dallas, Texas various qualifications are presented but it was difficult to determine the level of which these certificates are presented.

    Certificate: Essential Troubleshooting Skills with Hands-On Troubleshooting Training.

    This certificate covers aspects such as electrical/electronics troubleshooting training using the Starter Kit Troubleshooting, testing and measuring circuit voltage, current and resistance with a DMM, circuit failure and how to interpret live circuit readings to determine a circuit problem, reading of schematic diagrams, live electrical circuit problems, Digital Logic Probe with its advantages and disadvantages.

    Certificate: DC Motor Circuits and Advanced Troubleshooting Techniques.

    This certificate covers aspects such as the DC Motor Circuit Troubleshooting, Advanced electrical/electronics troubleshooting techniques. The differences in ohmmeters, how to avoid damaging sensitive electronic circuits, how to properly use an analog or digital ohmmeter to test solid-state components, troubleshooting different types of DC motors, starter motor, blower motor circuits and their unique differences and motor circuit problems.

    Certificate: Relay Circuit Troubleshooting & Advanced Troubleshooting Techniques.

    This certificate covers aspects such as Relay Circuit Troubleshooting, How Relays work; Relay circuit failure and troubleshooting relay circuits, spike suppression diodes, 75 relay circuit problems, advanced relay circuit problems.

    Kaw Area Technical School (KATS) offers the course on Auto Technology. This program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, service, and maintain all types of automobiles. Instruction includes basic theory and familiarization of automotive components, engine repair and performance, steering and suspension, automatic and manual transmission and transaxle, brakes, electricity/electronics, and heating and air conditioning systems. Hands-on activities are included for foundation and advanced courses.

    Veejer Enterprises in Garland, Texas offers a five-day course entitled "The Art of Teaching Auto/Truck Electrical & Electronics Systems Troubleshooting".

    Workshop Day 1: Essential Electrical Troubleshooting Skills H-111.

    Essential troubleshooting skills using the Starter Kit, H-111. Material covers how electrical circuits work, how to test electrical circuits, how electrical circuits fail and how to troubleshoot electrical circuits. Teachers then practice troubleshooting up to 32 individual electrical problems and learn to insert problems in the Troubleshooting Trainers, H-PCB01 and H-PCB02 (H-111).

    Workshop Day 2: Troubleshooting DC Motor Circuits H-113.

    More troubleshooting skill is developed troubleshooting brushless DC Motor Circuits using the Troubleshooting Trainer, H-PCB03 from H-113. Teachers practice troubleshooting DC Motor circuit electrical problems and learn to insert problems in the Troubleshooting Trainer, H-PCB03. Includes introduction to the various types of ohmmeters, their parameters, capabilities & limitations testing solid-state components and an introduction to key-off battery drain problems relating to DC motor circuit cooling fans. Later in Day 2 we will begin troubleshooting relays (Day 3 material) to make room in Day 3 to cover the new Troubleshooting Trainer H-PCB06, covering Wire Harness Troubleshooting.

    Workshop Day 3: Troubleshooting Relay Circuits H-115.

    Troubleshooting Relay Circuits using Troubleshooting Trainer H-PCB05 from H-115. Teachers troubleshoot live relay circuit problems including hard to find circuit failures, how relays cause key-off drain problems, how relays are controlled by shorts-to-voltage, etc and learn to insert problems in the Troubleshooting Trainer, H-PCB05.

    Wire Harness Troubleshooting, H-116 (Overview).

    A brief overview assembling and troubleshooting The Wire Harness Troubleshooting Trainer H-PCB06 from H-116. Teachers assemble a Mini-Electrical-System ("M.E.S." for short) combining all troubleshooting trainers together through the Wire Harness Troubleshooting Trainer and study unique electrical circuit problems relating to troubleshooting an electrical system.

    Workshop Day 4:

    Troubleshooting Batteries, unusual Battery Failures; How to troubleshoot a battery failure on the vehicle simply using a DMM and a DC Current Clamp. More about battery troubleshooting than you ever thought existed. For example, why is it sometimes impossible to jump start a vehicle with a dead battery and why you can jump start some vehicles but shouldn't.

    Cranking circuits and practical cranking circuit troubleshooting on the vehicle simply using a DMM and a DC Current Clamp. Systematic troubleshooting procedures are explained for battery troubleshooting and cranking circuit troubleshooting, testing voltage drops, as well as, troubleshooting these circuits with hands-on practice using a DMM and DC Current Clamp.

    Workshop Day 5:

    Troubleshooting charging systems.

    Systematic troubleshooting procedure is presented that shows a technician how to test the charging system in 60 seconds using only a DMM. Also discussed are the incorrect ways to test the charging system currently being promoted by some manufacturers and what those methods don't work.

    Troubleshooting Key-Off Battery Drain Problems.

    Discussion of key-off drain issues covers why on-board computers are the primary cause of key-off drain problems.

    Troubleshooting multiple battery systems.
    Covers principles of operation and troubleshooting concepts of batteries in series and parallel combinations with emphasis on battery voltage analysis versus battery current analysis.

    The final day concludes with a time for open discussion and critique.

    The company also offers "Auto/Truck Advanced Electrical Hands-On Troubleshooting Workshop Phase 1 and Phase 2.
    Day 1: (Phase 2):

    Essential Troubleshooting Skills with Hands-On Troubleshooting Training.

    Day 1 covers electrical/electronics troubleshooting training using the Starter Kit Troubleshooting Trainer, H-111, (H-PCB01/02). Students learn how to test and measure circuit voltage, current and resistance with a DMM and what the readings tell you about a circuit. Students study how circuits fail and how to interpret live circuit readings to determine a circuit problem. Reading of schematic diagrams is explained. Then students troubleshoot 32 individual live electrical circuit problems one at a time for hands-on practice. Afterwards, the Digital Logic Probe is explained with its advantages and disadvantages. Students receive and use a Digital Logic Probe to gain additional troubleshooting experience.

    Day 2: (Phase 2):

    DC Motor Circuits and Advanced Troubleshooting Techniques

    Day 2 covers the DC Motor Circuit Troubleshooting Trainer, H-113, (H-PCB03), where students learn advanced electrical/electronics troubleshooting techniques. The differences in ohmmeters; how to avoid damaging sensitive electronic circuits and how to properly use an analog or digital ohmmeter to test solid-state components are explained with hands-on application. Troubleshooting different types of DC motors, starter motor, blower motor circuits and their unique differences is reviewed. Students then troubleshoot about 37 DC Motor circuit problems one at a time for hands-on practice in troubleshooting.

    Day 3: (Phase 2):

    Relay Circuit Troubleshooting and Advanced Troubleshooting Techniques.

    Day 3 covers Relay Circuit Troubleshooting Trainer, H-115, (H-PCB05) where students learn how relays work, how relay circuits fail and how to troubleshoot relay circuits. Students learn about spike suppression diodes; what they do and how to properly test them. Students then troubleshoot up to 75 relay circuit problems in the remainder of the third day. Several advanced relay circuit problems are used to convince students what they have learned about troubleshooting as they successfully troubleshoot the most difficult relay circuit problems when the relay is not the problem.

    Day 4: (Phase 1) Advanced Electrical System Troubleshooting:

    What you need to know about batteries and their dual role in the electrical system. Techniques for troubleshooting unusual battery problems many technicians often misdiagnose and why. Proper battery troubleshooting is covered with advanced battery troubleshooting techniques explained using only a DMM and DC Current Clamp.

    Proper operation of cranking/starting circuits is discussed with a systematic step-by-step troubleshooting procedure for finding the cause of any starting circuit problem using only a DMM and Current Clamp.

    Day 5: (Phase 1) Advanced Electrical System Troubleshooting:

    Generator (alternator) circuits are explained and how the generator interfaces with the electrical system. Computer control of generators (alternators) is explained and how the PCM interacts with the generator (alternator). Analysis of the charging voltage value is discussed and a systematic troubleshooting procedures is given for testing the charging system on the vehicle. Students practice testing the charging voltage on vehicles.

    The focus of the US qualifications is on trouble shooting techniques for a variety of auto electrical problems. In comparison to the South African Qualifications it is almost the same as the suggested level of this qualification, with minor differences between the two qualifications.

    Japan and Jamaica:

    Japan and the Board of Cornerstone Ministries of Jamaica signed a contract to establish an automotive training centre at the Ministries' Connolley Avenue training facility in Kingston, Jamaica.

    The automotive training project, is administered in one-year cycles, and seeks to link the identified need for training and employment with the opportunities that the automotive industry made possible. The programme, he said would use the latest technology, utilising computerised simulated models.

    In addition, the primary objectives of the project were to train 40 young persons in automotive electrical and mechanic areas and students will receive certification for the project.
    Details of the programme are not available.

    Canada:

    Canada offers many automotive training courses. However, details of the courses listed below are sketchy. The courses are:

    School: Nova Career Centre:

    Course 1: Auto Detailing (Certificate):

    This on-site programme will teach the students how to keep their own and anybody else's car looking "Show-Room" new Programme Objective: To enable students to acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform tasks in the automotive industry. These include the basics such as oil and filter change, brake jobs and battery charging to more complicated procedures like engine rebuilding and transmission repairs. The learner will acquire skills in routing maintenance, shop work, drivetrain maintenance and repair, electrical systems, fuel systems and engine overhaul procedures.

    Course 2: Automotive Technician:

    Automobiles, like everything else are very much advanced in this high tech world. The programme for Automotive Technicians is great for solving computer and fuel injection problems or just sticking to the mechanical side of things. Graduates have a wide range of skills and can work in a number of capacities in the automobile industry.

    Programme Objectives are similar to the course above.

    West Island Career Centre (Pierrefonds, Quebec):

    Course 1: Automobile Mechanics:

    The Automobile Mechanics program enables students to acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes to perform tasks in the automotive industry. These include the basics such as oil and filter change, brake jobs and battery charging to more complicated procedures like engine rebuilding and transmission repairs.

    Automobile Mechanics repair and service automobiles and other gasoline powered vehicles. Mechanics correct mechanical problems and perform preventive maintenance to keep automotive equipment in good operating condition. They may do everything from tune-ups to tearing down, repairing, and rebuilding engines and transmissions. Other duties include servicing suspension systems, brakes and steering, air conditioning, heating, and cooling systems.

    The Trade - details:

    Interpersonal Communication.
    Health, Safety and Environmental Protection.
    Welding and Cutting.
    Shop Work.
    Job Search Techniques.
    Starting a Business.
    Characteristics of Motor Vehicles.
    Internal Combustion Engines.
    Basic Electrical and Electronic Circuits.
    Engine and Passenger Temperature Systems.
    Road Holding Systems.
    Transmission Assemblies.
    Basic Computer-Controlled Systems.
    Starting and Charging Systems and Electromagnetic Accessories.
    Passive and Active Security Systems.
    Electronic Ignition Systems.
    Antipollution and Electronic Injection Systems.

    Laurier Macdonald Career Centre (St. Leonard, Quebec).

    Course 1: Automobile Mechanics (Diploma):

    Program objectives in Automobile Mechanics include the performance of basic tasks such as tune-ups, oil and filter changes, brake jobs and charging batteries. Students also learn more complicated procedures such as engine rebuilding, transmission repairs and electromagnetic accessory repairs. Students are taught to repair air conditioning and heating systems.

    Our Auto Mechanics course will teach the novice everything from the workings of internal combustion engines to repairing electronic ignitions and antipollution systems. Working with the public and communication skills are a component of the program, as are health, safety and environmental protection.

    Uganda:

    The Nakawa Vocational Training Institute (NVTI) is one of the four Public Vocational Training Institutes directly operated and administered by the Ministry of Education and Sports (MoES) through the BTVET Department.

    The Institute was established in 1971 by the GOU in cooperation with the Government of Japan through the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The primary objective of the establishment was to provide vocational training skills to school leavers and apprentices in enterprises and to upgrade and assess competencies of industrial workers.

    Among its many offerings, the NVTI offers training in motor vehicles. The course includes the following aspects:
  • Electronic Control Fuel Injection (EFI).
  • Automatic Transmission.
  • Radiator Repair.
  • Engine Overhaul.
  • Auto Electrical.
  • Body Care.
  • Preventive Maintenance.
  • Defensive driving.

    Details of these courses are not available.

    Training at BMW:

    BMW Service Apprenticeship:

    Unlike the majority of motor manufacturers, all BMW Service Apprentices attend the BMW Group Academy UK in Berkshire for their off-the-job training. This ensures consistent training throughout the country and allows our apprentices to train on up-to-the-minute products and technology. The training runs for a 2-3 year period and takes the form of classroom and workshop sessions.

    On completion the learner will receive the UK's NVQ Level 2 in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair, and the NVQ Level 3 in Vehicle Maintenance and Repair.

    Parts Apprenticeship:

    The Parts Apprenticeship Programme is unique to BMW and is undertaken mainly within the dealership. The training consists of computer based training (CBT) and modular units. Training is completed at the dealership where candidates are allocated 4 hours per week to study for their qualification. All candidates also attend a minimum of four core parts courses, parts tutorials and off-the-job training at the BMW Group Academy UK during their training programme. The programme is primarily distance learning at the dealership and is structured to be completed in two years.

    On completion the learner will receive the UK's NVQ Level 2 in Parts Operations and NVQ Level 3 in Parts Operations.

    Training at Volvo:

    I-CAR Training for Volvo Level 3.

    50% (or a minimum of 2 technicians for small body shops):
  • Measuring (MEA01).
  • Structural Straightening Steel (SSS01).
  • Steel Unibody Front and Rear Rails, Floors, and Front Structure (SPS01).
  • Steel Unibody A, B, C, D, pillars, and Rocker Panels (SPS02).
  • Volvo Structural Repair (VLV03).

    SADC:

    None of the SADC countries have their own qualifications relating to Autotronics, but use the British City and Guilds Standards for training learners in the automotive field. Namibia has indicated interest in the South African qualifications and may implement this qualification once it has been registered. Namibia is currently in the process of developing vocational certificates for registration on the Namibia Qualifications Framework. Various initiatives are in place to ensure that their qualifications are in line with the South African Qualifications.

    Conclusion:

    The competencies covered in the National Certificate: Autotronics, Level 3 are either similar to or have some overlap with some of the qualifications that are offered in countries investigated here. While direct and complete comparisons are rarely possible - given the very different contexts in the countries investigated - there are significant (and sometimes not-so-significant) overlaps between this qualification and those internationally. In some cases, it is difficult to figure out the levels of the international courses and qualifications but the overlap in competencies helped to benchmark this Qualification.

    This Qualification enjoys close similarity with the qualifications from Australia and New Zealand. The qualifications in these countries are unit standards based and offer comprehensive Electives that, together with the Core, cover most of this Qualification. There is also a similarity with the levels and duration of this Qualification and those in Australia and New Zealand. The competencies of the qualifications in the United Kingdom also overlap significantly with the competencies contained herein. In addition, the UK qualifications match this Qualification in terms of duration. The comparison with these three countries is enhanced by the fact that the qualifications offered in those countries are in an outcomes-based format. An advantage was that a fair amount of information is available and this promotes a more comprehensive comparability.

    The qualification in Malaysia is a general automotive qualification and is taught over a period of two years. However, aspects pertaining to the electrical - from both years - overlap with this qualification. In the United States, the identified certificate and short courses in the autotronics field have a heavy emphasis on the auto electrical aspect. The focus of these qualifications and short courses is on troubleshooting auto electrical system problems. The target audience of the workshops are those who are involved in teaching autotronics to others. The qualifications identified in Canada are more or less of the same duration as this Qualification. While they are not specifically for autotronics but are broadly for the automotive field, some of the competencies of those qualifications overlap with this Qualification. The Ugandan qualification is also of a general nature but contains the auto electrical aspect.

    On the whole this qualification compares very favourably with international qualifications or aspects there from. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification lends itself to both vertical and horizontal articulation possibilities.

    Horizontal articulation is possible with the following Qualifications:
  • ID: 71989: National Certificate: Automotive Components: Manufacturing and Assembly at NQF Level 3.
  • National Certificate: Automotive Repair and Maintenance at NQF Level 3.
  • ID: 64529: National Certificate: Automotive Body Repair at NQF Level 3.
  • ID: 64409: National Certificate: Automotive Spray Painting at NQF Level 3.

    Vertical articulation is possible with the following Qualifications:
  • ID: 71949: Further Education and Training Certificate: Automotive Components: Manufacturing and Assembly at NQF Level 4.
  • Further Education and Training Certificate: Automotive Repair and Maintenance at NQF Level 4.
  • ID: 64549: Further Education and Training Certificate: Automotive Body Repair at NQF Level 4.
  • ID: 64411: Further Education and Training Certificate: Automotive Spray Painting at NQF Level 4. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, and Assurance (ETQA) Body.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the ETQA's policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation; in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between ETQA's (including professional bodies); and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed immediately below.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual Unit Standards, the integrated competence described in the Qualification and will include competence within core sales and the elective standards relevant to the economic sector.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this Qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    For an applicant to register as an assessor, the applicant needs:
  • A minimum of 4 (four) years' practical, relevant occupational experience.
  • A relevant Qualification at NQF Level 4 or higher.
  • To be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA. 

  • NOTES 
    As per the SAQA decision, after consultation with the Quality Councils, to re-register all qualifications and part qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework that meet the criteria for re-registration, this qualification has been re-registered from 1 July 2012.
    This qualification replaces qualification 22859, "National Certificate: Autotronics", Level 3, 141 credits. 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  264996  Construct and test basic electronic circuits  Level 2  NQF Level 02  16 
    Core  376601  Diagnose, test and repair conventional automobile charging systems  Level 3  NQF Level 03  16 
    Core  376606  Diagnose, test and repair conventional automobile starting systems  Level 3  NQF Level 03  16 
    Core  376603  Service and repair conventional automobile ignition systems  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  260437  Trace and repair auto electrical circuit faults  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  376607  Use technical information to understand auto electrical circuits  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  120344  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of relevant current occupational health and safety legislation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9010  Demonstrate an understanding of the use of different number bases and measurement units and an awareness of error in the context of relevant calculations  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9013  Describe, apply, analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9012  Investigate life and work related problems using data and probabilities  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119467  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  7456  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business and national issues  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  258679  Operate and monitor a lathe  Level 2  NQF Level 02  12 
    Elective  116937  Use a Graphical User Interface (GUI)-based spreadsheet application to create and edit spreadsheets  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  242814  Identify and explain the core and support functions of an organisation  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  260723  Install, test and maintain a basic fluid power system  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  13139  Install, test and maintain a basic pneumatic system  Level 3  NQF Level 03  10 
    Elective  9526  Manage basic business finance  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  9530  Manage work time effectively  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  114979  Operate a computer workstation in a business environment  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  116720  Show understanding of diversity in the workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  9533  Use communication skills to handle and resolve conflict in the workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  260737  Diagnose and repair vehicle ignition systems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    When qualifications are replaced, some (but not all) of their learning programmes are moved to the replacement qualifications. If a learning programme appears to be missing from here, please check the replaced qualification.
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Quality Assuring Bodies have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Quality Assuring Body should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. BMW SA (Pty) Ltd (ROSSLYN) (TP) 
    2. Dawsons Training Academy (Pty) Ltd (DURBAN) (TP) 
    3. Eastcape Midlands Public FET College - Charles Good Year Campus 
    4. Eastcape Midlands Public FET College - Uitenhage (High Street)Campus 
    5. Imperial Technical Training Academy (GERMISTON) (TP) 
    6. Imperial Technical Training Academy (WADEVILLE) (TP) 
    7. Inncor Training & Development (Pty) Ltd (VEREENIGING) (TP) 
    8. McCarthy Academy Cape Town (BLACKHEATH) (TP) 
    9. McCarthy Automotive Artisan Academy (MIDRAND) (TP) 
    10. McCarthy Automotive Artisans Academy (PINETOWN) (TP) 
    11. Northlink College - Bellville Campus 
    12. The Automobile Association of South Africa T/A AA Training Academy (MO 
    13. The Automobile Association South Africa T/A AA Training Academy (MIDRA 
    14. Tshwane South Public FET College - Centurion Campus 
    15. Volkswagen of South Africa (Pty) Ltd - Technical Learning Academy (UIT 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.