SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: 2D Animation 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
57611  National Certificate: 2D Animation 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Audio-visual Media Production 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
MICTS - Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 04 - Communication Studies and Language  Media Studies 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  136  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2023-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The purpose of this Qualification is to enable qualified learners to generate independent work and critically apply the principles of 2D animation. Self employment opportunities exist for qualified learners as they do not need a large studio, and technology is becoming more affordable. This makes 2D animation more accessible than, for example, 3D animation. 2D animation requires a strategic balance between art and business, and is more artistic than, for example, design, without compromising the discipline required to build the industry and business.

Developing local 2D animation competence will ensure local cultural development: a local form of expression is developed, with a local graphic style, as a local art form. This can improve the export of 2D animation as cultural products. Qualified learners are able to think critically about culture and cultural products - a skill that can be transferred to various related fields.

Qualified learners can progress to NQF Level 6 and beyond, and competence achieved in this qualification allows them to transfer credits to related areas, such as visual arts, computer programming, etc. By setting a minimum standard, the qualification contributes to ensuring the quality of education and training programmes and the employability of qualified learners in various contexts.

Qualified learners are able to draw from references, and generate products. They can also work independently as business owners. They implement a process of drawing, analysing motion, breaking down motion, enhancing motion, creating expressiveness, and animating objects and figures. They can work on flat surfaces (e.g. cartoon/frame-by-frame drawn, cut-out, modified base, or rotoscoping animation) or in three-dimensional space to create clay, object, puppet, pixilation, or direct animation, using frame replacement, modified surface, or three-dimensional space forms, or hybrids of these forms.

Qualified learners are capable of:
  • Selecting and analysing reference material relevant for specific animation productions.
  • Analysing visual and motion requirements for specific animation productions.
  • Specifying visual and motion treatment for specific animation productions.
  • Developing and selecting animation outputs for specific animation productions.
  • Evaluating animated visual elements against specified animation production requirements.
  • Managing animation production processes and information according to specifications.

    Rationale:

    The international market for animated media content is growing, and until recently, this market had remained untapped by South Africans. The international market is difficult to access and is expensive. Local broadcasters are not yet willing to purchase or budget for animation products. Nonetheless, television, advertisements and film festivals are using more and more animation, and fabricated content is becoming more feasible as technology is becoming cheaper. The music video station market is also growing and demands animated content and animated station identities.

    Existing 2D animation qualifications are mostly software-based, and not outcomes-based.To access the local and the international market, the 2D animation sector requires improved levels of competence and more people to be involved in animation production. This Qualification is set to deliver a first level of competence where qualified learners can be employed in the 2D animation sector as entry level animators.

    There is a need to introduce 2D animation learners who have already achieved a Further Education and Training Certificate or equivalent Qualification. Learners are generally expected to learn while working, whether employed or not. The learning pathway extends to Doctorate level, and learners can progress within the Higher Education band upon completion of this NQF Level 5 qualification.

    Qualified learners are able to work in stand-alone animation studios, or in animation departments of post production facilities, or advertising agencies. They are able to work as freelance animators in various sectors, including gaming and film and video production (e.g. short form commercial producers). Qualified learners are able to apply the unique or exclusive qualities that animation afford to visual storytelling, can think critically about culture, to not just produce replicas of other countries' product, while still meeting international standard. This will enable the 2D animators and the sector as a whole to compete internationally.

    Animation production is a developing field in South Africa. This developmental animation approach requires bringing in new technologies and not simply using a set of inherited technologies, thereby creating solutions for the local environment and local problems, and improving content relevance. Rather than copying, for example, the American studio model of production. This Qualification aims to enhance learners' ability to experiment with production models, to find models that are feasible or to combine various models. In doing this, African content with saleable local aesthetic will replace American and European content. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    The qualification design and credits assume that learners have already achieved the following competencies:
  • Art, drawing and design (visual literacy) at NQF Level 4.
  • Language and communication at NQF Level 4 in one language and at NQF Level 3 in another language.
  • Mathematical literacy at NQF Level 4.
  • Computer literacy at NQF Level 4.
  • Understanding relevant physics concepts such as Newtonian laws of mass in motion NQF Level 4.
  • Photography at NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of prior learning:

    This qualification can be achieved wholly, or in part, through recognition of prior learning. Evidence can be presented in a variety of forms, including previous international or local qualifications, reports, testimonials, mentoring, functions performed, portfolios, work records and performance records. As such, evidence should be judged according to the general principles of assessment described in the notes to assessors below. Learners who have met the requirements of any Unit Standard that forms part of this qualification may apply for recognition of prior learning to the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance body (ETQA). The applicant must be assessed against the specific outcomes and with the assessment criteria for the relevant Unit Standards. A qualification will be awarded should a learner demonstrate that the exit level outcomes of the qualification have been attained.

    Access to the qualification:

    Access to this qualification is open, provided that the learner is sighted, because of the visual nature of 2D animation work. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    All Fundamental component unit standards (40 credits) and all Core component unit standards (55 credits) are compulsory (Total: 95 credits). For the Elective component, learners are required to achieve at least one of the following three combinations of unit standards:

    1. Animation specialisation: all unit standards listed below (41 credits)
  • Unit Standard title: Composite layers for animation, ID 242638, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Render files for animation, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Develop single characters for animation, ID 242651, Level 5, 15 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Create graphic elements for a multimedia/web-based computer application, ID 115366 , Level 5, 10 credits.

    2. Business and projects specialisation (41 credits):

    One of the following for 8, 10 or 15 credits of the 41 credits required:
  • Unit Standard title: Composite layers for animation, ID 242638, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Render files for animation, ID 242541, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Develop single characters for animation, ID 242651, Level 5, 15 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Create graphic elements for a multimedia/web-based computer application, ID 115366 , Level 5, 10 credits.

    And at least 33, 31 or 26 credits from the following, for the remainder of the 41 credits:
  • Unit Standard title: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques, ID 120385, Level 4, 7 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Support the project environment and activities to deliver project objectives, ID 120378, Level 5, 14 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Generate resources for projects, ID 115171, Level 5, 6 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Tender for projects, ID 117515, Level 5, 7 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Gather, record and interpret business related information, ID 115499, Level 4, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Conduct a marketing situational analysis, ID 10041, Level 5, 5 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Analyse and interpret data and marketing information, ID 10056, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Analyse new developments reported in the media that could impact on a business sector or industry, ID 13943, Level 4, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Record business financial transactions, ID 114736, Level 4, 5 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Participate in the estimation and preparation of cost budgets for an element of work and monitor and control actual cost against budget, ID 10134, Level 4, 6 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Interpret basic financial statements, ID 117156, Level 4, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Plan, monitor and control the financial resources for a small company or business unit, ID 116787, Level 5, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Harness diversity and build on strengths of a diverse working environment, ID 15233, Level 5, 3 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Design and implement plans to deal with conflict situations, ID 117855, Level 5, 15 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Build teams to meet set goals and objectives, ID 15237, Level 5, 3 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions, ID 12140, Level 5, 9 credits.

    3. Performing arts specialisation (41 credits)

    All of the following for 25 credits of the 41 credits required:
  • Unit Standard title: Develop single characters for animation, ID New, Level 5, 15 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Analyse performance texts in context, ID 114551, Level 4, 10 credits.

    And at least 16 credits from the following, for the remainder of the 41 credits:
  • Unit Standard title: Apply a range of project management tools and techniques, ID 120385, Level 4, 7 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Support the project environment and activities to deliver project objectives, ID 120378, Level 5, 14 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Generate resources for projects, ID 115171, Level 5, 6 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Tender for projects, ID 117515, Level 5, 7 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Gather, record and interpret business related information, ID 115499, Level 4, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Conduct a marketing situational analysis, ID 10041, Level 5, 5 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Analyse and interpret data and marketing information, ID 10056, Level 5, 8 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Analyse new developments reported in the media that could impact on a business sector or industry, ID 13943, Level 4, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Record business financial transactions, ID 114736, Level 4, 5 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Participate in the estimation and preparation of cost budgets for an element of work and monitor and control actual cost against budget, ID 10134, Level 4, 6 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Interpret basic financial statements, ID 117156, Level 4, 4 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Plan, monitor and control the financial resources for a small company or business unit, ID 116787, Level 5, 10 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Harness diversity and build on strengths of a diverse working environment, ID 15233, Level 5, 3 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Design and implement plans to deal with conflict situations, ID 117855, Level 5, 15 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Build teams to meet set goals and objectives, ID 15237, Level 5, 3 credits.
  • Unit Standard title: Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions, ID 12140, Level 5, 9 credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Select and analyse reference material relevant for specific animation productions.
    2. Analyse visual and motion requirements for specific animation productions.
    > Range: visual and motion requirements are contained in scripts, storyboards, treatments, etc.
    3. Specify visual and motion treatment for specific animation productions.
    4. Develop and select animation outputs for specific animation productions.
    5. Evaluate animated visual elements against specified for animation production requirements.
    > Range: evaluation includes testing where relevant.
    6. Manage animation production processes and information according to specification.
    > Range: information includes all animation process and production outputs, such as visual elements, physical pictorial representations, etc. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    1.
  • Reference material and sources are relevant for specific animation purposes and production processes, and range of reference materials sufficiently represents animation production processes.
  • Analysis of reference materials is justified in terms of specific animation production requirements.
  • Reference materials are organised, categorised and archived according to specified procedures and are accessible for all relevant persons at required times.

    2.
  • Identified visual and motion requirements are justified for specific animation production contexts and requirements.
  • Visual element, design, and visual breakdown requirements are accurately identified.
  • Motion frequency is accurately determined.

    3.
  • Visual treatments and motion treatments are compiled according to given procedures for specific animations and are based on identified visual and motion requirements.
  • Design of visual elements for animation meet specified requirements.

    4.
  • Animation outputs meet specified animation production requirements and animation principles are adhered to.
    > Range: animation outputs include production stills, representations of motion analysis, simplified representation of motion, graphic breakdown, physical pictorial representations, visual elements, etc.
  • Key positions, in-betweens, and key points are made appropriate for intended motion, motion outcome and visual flow.
  • Timing of animation is ensured that it meets specific requirements and breakdowns adhere to identified source materials and standardised format requirements.

    5.
  • All draft and final outputs are evaluated against given production specifications and according to given procedures.
    > Range: production specifications include requirements of viability, quality, audience, etc.
  • Refinements and recommendations are justified in terms of specified animation production requirements and contexts.

    6.
  • Organisation, storage and archiving of information meet specified organisation requirements.
  • Information is accessible to all relevant persons as required.
  • Organisation of production environments ensures efficient work flow and production environments are maintained according to specified procedures.

    Integrated assessment:

    The assessment criteria in the unit standards are performance-based, assessing applied competence, knowledge and skills. The critical cross-field outcomes are also achieved in the unit standards. In addition to the competence assessed to achieve the unit standards, learners must demonstrate that they can achieve the outcomes in an integrated manner, dealing effectively with different and random demands related to occupational and learning contexts, to qualify, and assessment approaches used should be appropriate for assessing applied competence. Integrated assessment is meaningful if there are clear relationships between the purpose statement, exit level outcomes and integrated assessment of this qualification.

    Learners who qualify must be able to integrate concepts, ideas and behaviours across unit standards to achieve the purpose of the qualification. Evidence (as specified in the associated assessment criteria) is required that the learner is able to achieve the exit level outcomes of the qualification as a whole and in an integrated way, and thus its purpose, at the time of the award of the qualification.

    Evidence of integration may be presented by learners when being assessed against the unit standards, and separate assessment for integration may not be necessary. Workplace experience can be recognised when assessing towards this qualification. Integrated assessment should include observable performance as well as the quality of thinking behind such performance. Formative assessment can be employed during learning towards the unit standards and during integration to achieve exit level outcomes, to ensure that integration takes place when summative assessment is employed. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The leaders in animation education and training are in Canada (e.g. Vancouver Film School, Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning), the United Kingdom, and the United States of America (e.g. Californian Institute of the Arts, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania), with some new developments taking place in India.

    Most training providers operating in India are based in the United States of America and Canada. An example of a provider in India is ANTS (Animation Training School). The school offers a 6 month Foundation Course in 2D Animation, a 6 month Diploma in 2D Animation, a 12 month Advanced Diploma in 2D Animation, a 12 month Diploma in 2D &3D Animation, a 24 month Advanced Diploma in 2D &3D Animation and various software base short courses (Maya, Flash, Photoshop, Combustion, etc.). The Advanced Diploma in 2D Animation is at a comparable level with this South African qualification. However, no further information about the programme was available. Another provider, Animaster (The Animation Varsity) offers a 3 month Foundation Programme, a 12 month Certified Professional programme, a 3 year Advanced Diploma (linked to a Canadian provider), a 24 month graduate programme, and various short courses that are software based.

    The Certified Professional programme is comparable with this South African qualification:
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Basic methods of drawing, South Africa: Learning assumed to be in place.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Anatomy, South Africa: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Life study, South Africa: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Detailed Proportion-study, South Africa: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Animal anatomy, South Africa: Fundamental and Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Perspective, South Africa: Core.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Drawing for animation, South Africa: Fundamental.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Character designing, South Africa: Elective.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Principles of animation, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Character animation, South Africa: Core.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Special effects animation, South Africa: Not included.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Writing for animation, South Africa: Not included.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Pre-production, South Africa: Core.
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Backgrounds, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Assistant animation training, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Animaster Certified Professional: Project, South Africa: Core (integrated).

    No comparable qualifications were found in other African countries (e.g. Lesotho, Namibia, Botswana, Malawi, and Kenya). In Namibia, equivalent level qualifications are in the fields of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Economics and Management Science, Education, Humanities and Social Science (which includes Visual Arts, but not animation), Law, Medical and Health Science, and Science (which focuses on computer science only). In Botswana, equivalent level qualifications are available in the fields of engineering and technology, but are limited to industrial design. In Malawi, qualifications focus on agriculture, commerce, education, engineering, law, medicine, nursing, (natural) sciences and social sciences. In Kenya, qualifications focus on veterinary medicine, architecture design and development, arts (drama and theatre only), (natural) science, medicine and education.

    In Canada, animation qualifications start at a level equivalent to this South African qualification. For example, at the Vancouver Film School the programmes in Classical Animation, slightly shorter in terms of estimated notional hours (1200 notional hours or 120 credits), and in 2D Animation, slightly more in terms of estimated notional hours (1400 notional hours or 140 credits) compare as follows with this South African qualification:
  • 2D Animation: Life drawing for animation , Classical Animation: Life drawing, South Africa: Fundamental.
  • 2D Animation: Animation (movement, life, sound, colour), Classical Animation: Animation, South Africa: Core.
  • 2D Animation: Storyboarding, Classical Animation: Storyboarding, South Africa: Core.
  • 2D Animation: Not included, Classical Animation: Film theory, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Composition, South Africa: Core.
  • 2D Animation: Not included, Classical Animation: Character design, South Africa: Elective.
  • 2D Animation: Photoshop, flash software, Classical Animation: Flash, South Africa: Integrated throughout (not package specific), and Elective.
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Acting principles, South Africa: Partially integrated (Core) and Elective.
  • 2D Animation: Media delivery, Classical Animation: Digitise and finish films, South Africa: Core.
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Camera technique, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Not included, Classical Animation: Background design, South Africa: Not included.
  • 2D Animation: Layout and design, Classical Animation: Layout, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Animation history, Classical Animation: History of animation, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Clean-up, South Africa: Core.
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Perspective, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Animation assist, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Not included, Classical Animation: Effects animation, South Africa: Not included.
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Colour theory, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Doping and slugging, South Africa: Core.
  • 2D Animation: Media assembly , Classical Animation: Post production, South Africa: Core, Elective.
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Digital ink and paint, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Sound, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Integrated, Classical Animation: Story concept, South Africa: Integrated (Core).
  • 2D Animation: Not included, Classical Animation: Portfolio assembly, South Africa: Core.

    The 2D Animation qualification and the South African qualification are equivalent. The Classical Animation qualification includes background design and effects animation, which could form part of the elective component in the South African qualification.

    Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Canada offers a four-year Bachelor of Applied Arts (Animation) that is at a level above the level of this qualification. At first year level, the qualification compares as follows with this South African qualification:

    Bachelor of Applied Arts (Animation) Year I:
  • Sheridan: Introduction to digital tools, South Africa: Integrated throughout.
  • Sheridan: Introduction to dynamic anatomy, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Sheridan: Visual concepts, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Sheridan: Introduction to dimensional drawing, South Africa: Fundamental.
  • Sheridan: Life drawing, South Africa: Fundamental.
  • Sheridan: Sound design: music, sound effects, vocal production, South Africa: Core (integrated, partially).
  • Sheridan: Art in a social and cultural context, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Sheridan: Animation history, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Sheridan: International politics introduction, South Africa: Not included.
  • Sheridan: Principles of psychology,Core (integrated, partially).
  • Sheridan: Social and cultural anthropology, South Africa: Not included.
  • Sheridan: Applied research methods, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Sheridan: Animation and design, South Africa: Core.
  • Sheridan: Animation principles, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • Sheridan: Digital methodologies, South Africa: Core (integrated), Elective.
  • Sheridan: Layout and storyboarding, South Africa: Core
  • Sheridan: Composition and rhetoric, South Africa: Core (integrated, partially).
  • Sheridan: Performance analysis, South Africa: Elective.

    The South African qualification compares well with this qualification at first year level. In addition, aspects included in the South African qualification are addressed later in the Sheridan programme, for example, animation and design of action, pose and graphics; action analysis; figure analysis; modelling; 2D animation. Therefore, the major difference between the South African qualification and the Sheridan qualification is that the former does not address social studies (psychology, anthropology, politics, and rhetoric), which form part of other qualifications in South Africa, mostly at a level above this qualification.

    The Californian Institute of the Arts (CalArts) in the United States of America differentiates between experimental and character animation, and offer two programmes at a level above the level of this qualification: a Bachelor of Fine Art: Experimental Animation, and a Bachelor of Fine Art: Character Animation (both four years). The former qualification focuses on creative concept creative and technical proficiency and the latter on technical proficiency only. This South African qualification addresses mostly technical proficiency, rather than creative concept creation (which is considered to be at a level above this qualification), and the two CalArts qualifications compare as follows with this South African qualification:

    Bachelor of Fine Art: Experimental Animation Year I:
  • CalArts: 2-D animation, South Africa: Core.
  • CalArts: Stop-motion animation, South Africa: Core.
  • CalArts: 2-D and 3-D computer animation, South Africa: Core (partially).
  • CalArts: History of animation, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • CalArts: History of experimental animation as a fine art form, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • CalArts: Experimental animation under supervision, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • CalArts: Life drawing, South Africa: Fundamental.
  • CalArts: Colour and design, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • CalArts: Storytelling, South Africa: Core (integrated).
  • CalArts: Character animation, South Africa: Core.

    Another programme example in the United States of America was identified at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, namely, a Bachelor of Fine Arts: Cinema (Animation/Film/Video). The qualification is at a level above this qualification, but includes a beginning level that compares as follows with this South African qualification:

    Bachelor of Fine Art: Bachelor of Fine Arts: (Animation) - Beginning level

    Compulsory
  • Edinboro: Character animation basic principles and fundamentals (thumbnailing, timing and spacing, staging, solidity and dimension, personality), South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Rough animation line testing and critique, South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Drawing for animation (apply gesture, attitude and expression to animation), South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Computer animation (all forms) (history and aesthetics of computer animation and expressing personal vision), South Africa: Core(intergrated).
  • Edinboro: Experimental animation (paint on glass, sand, collage, cut-out, and scratch on film, using the elements of design, colour and value, and manipulation ofpositive and negative shapes), South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Stop motion animation (puppets, objects, clay, pixilation; design and build sets, engineer ball and socket joint armatures for characters and objects), South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Storyboards and staging, South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Design, South Africa: Core (integrated, partially).
  • Edinboro: Lighting, South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Camera, South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Movement, South Africa: Core.
  • Edinboro: Editing, South Africa: Core (partially).

    Elective 12 credits

    Edinboro: Art elective courses in computer animation (Computer Animation I, Computer Animation II, Advanced Computer Animation I, Advanced Computer Animation II), South Africa: Core.

    At Full Sail, also in the United States of America, a 14-month programme is offered at the level of this South African qualification, namely, an Associate of Science Degree in Computer Animation. It compares as follows with the South African qualification:

    Associate of Science Degree in Computer Animation
  • Full Sail: The history of 3D computer graphics, South Africa: Not included.
  • Full Sail: 2D animation (controlling and manipulating a subject's volume, weight, proportion, acting, and movement), South Africa: Core.
  • Full Sail: 2D and 3D computer graphics, equipment and software applications, South Africa: Core (partially, integrated).
  • Full Sail: Operating and file systems, and commands, South Africa: Core (partially, integrated).
  • Full Sail: Character, environments, and camera action design and creation, South Africa: Core.
  • Full Sail: Character rigging, South Africa: Not included.
  • Full Sail: Acting for animators (acting theory, character motion and emotion, express and imply emotion through motion, body language, tell a story through computer animation), South Africa: Elective.
  • Full Sail: Game techniques (game content creation, hardware shading, normal mappings, effects creation, rigging, and animation for game characters), South Africa: Not included.
  • Full Sail: Animation in 3D (character walk, run, jump, sit, throw, catch, hit, and dance according to storyboard), South Africa: Not included.
  • Full Sail: Project planning and coordination, South Africa: Elective.

    Other providers such as Digital Media Academy linked to Stanford University and the University of Texas in the United States of America, and East Tennessee State University and The Art Institute of Philadelphia offer short courses of five days to eleven weeks that address specific components contained in the South African qualification, such as 2D character modelling and animation, principles, terms and terminology of 2D animation, trajectories, in/out tangents, weight/displacement, motion and camera movement, wrapping, texturing, particle systems and flow, rendering, storyboarding, 2D animation production, history of animation, timing, spacing, straight ahead vs. pose to pose, keys, extremes and in-betweens, squash and stretch, dope sheets, editing, set driven animation, staging, anticipation, holds, primary and secondary action, overlapping action, exaggeration, sequencing, working with sound, and video.

    The South African qualification compares well with the above American qualifications, but does not include 3D animation as it is a separate qualification in South Africa.

    In the United Kingdom various animation qualifications exist below the level of this South African qualification. At an equivalent level, a BTEC Higher National Certificate in 3D Design exists, but no comparable qualifications for animation or 2D animation. The University of the Arts London's London College of Communication offers an equivalent level two-year Foundation Degree in Animation, and a one-year Certificate in Animation at a level below this South African qualification.

    An example of a programme was identified at Ballyfermot College of Further Education in Ireland. The College offers a 1-year programme culminating in a South African Level 5 equivalent Certificate in Art. The programme includes life drawing, drawing and painting, animation and layout studies, sculpture, art and animation history, communications, and drama. The programme focuses on the development of strong drawing skills, provides a broad introduction to animation, and compares well with the South African qualification. The College also offers an equivalent level, 2-year National Higher Diploma in Classical and Computer Animation, including animation, computer animation and modelling, visual language, layout, design history theory and practice (with film studies), life drawing, studio practice, design history theory and practice (with script writing). The main difference between this programme and the South African qualification is the emphasis on design, which also explains the difference in estimated notional hours.

    The South African qualification is of equal notional hours, and is comparable in terms of structure and content with international qualifications at equivalent levels. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    Vertical articulation is possible with the:
  • Bachelor of Visual Communications (NQF Level 6), ID 49603.
  • Bachelors Degree: Design, ID 48810.

    Horizontal articulation on the NQF is possible with the:
  • National Certificate: 3D Animation (NQF Level 5), ID 57607.
  • National Certificate: Interactive Media (NQF Level 5), ID 49121.
  • National Certificate: Craft Operational Management (NQF Level 5), ID 49119.
  • National Diploma: Marketing Management (NQF Level 5), ID 20900.
  • National Diploma in Master Craftsmanship (NQF Level 5), ID 49059.
  • National Certificate: Conflict Management and Transformation (NQF Level 5), ID 49257.
  • National Certificate: Management (NQF Level 5), ID 1093. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Moderation of assessment and accreditation of providers shall be at the discretion of a relevant ETQA as long as it complies with the SAQA requirements. The ETQA is responsible for moderation of learner achievements of learners who meet the requirements of this qualification. Particular moderation and accreditation requirements are:
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA. Providers offering learning towards achievement of any of the unit standards that make up this qualification must also be accredited through the relevant ETQA accredited by SAQA.
  • The ETQA will oversee assessment and moderation of assessment according to their policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation, or in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between the relevant ETQA and other ETQAs and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed here.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments for the qualification, unless the relevant ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described in Unit Standards as well as the integrated competence described in the qualification.
  • Internal moderation of assessment must take place at the point of assessment with external moderation provided by a relevant ETQA according to the moderation guidelines and the agreed ETQA procedures.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessment of learner achievements takes place at providers accredited by the relevant ETQA (RSA, 1998b) for the provision of programs that result in the outcomes specified for this qualification. Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this qualification must be registered as an assessor with the ETQA. Assessors registered with the relevant ETQA must carry out the assessment of learners for the qualification and any of the Unit Standards that make up this qualification.

    To register as an assessor, the following are required:
  • Detailed documentary proof of relevant qualification/s, practical training completed, and experience gained at a NQF level above the level of this qualification.
  • NQF recognised assessor credit.

    Assessors should keep the following general principles in mind when designing and conducting assessments:
  • Focus the initial assessment activities on gathering evidence in terms of the main outcomes expressed in the titles of the Unit Standards to ensure assessment is integrated rather than fragmented. The learner must be declared competent in terms of the qualification purpose and exit level outcomes.
  • Where assessment across Unit Standard titles or at Unit Standard title level is unmanageable, then focus assessment around each specific outcome, or groups of specific outcomes. Take special note of the need for integrated assessment.
  • Make sure evidence is gathered across the entire range, wherever it applies.

    In particular, assessors should assess that the learner demonstrates an ability to consider a range of options by:
  • Measuring the quality of the observed practical performance as well as the theory and underpinning knowledge.
  • Using methods that are varied to allow the learner to display thinking and decision making in the demonstration of practical performance.
  • Maintaining a balance between practical performance and theoretical assessment methods to ensure each is measured in accordance with the level of the qualification.
  • Taking into account that the relationship between practical and theoretical components is not fixed, but varies according to the type and level of qualification.

    All assessments should be conducted in line with the following well-documented principles:
  • Appropriate: The method of assessment is suited to the performance being assessed.
  • Fair: The method of assessment does not present any barriers to achievements, which are not related to the evidence.
  • Manage: The methods used make for easily arranged cost-effective assessments that do not unduly interfere with learning.
  • Integrate into work or learning: Evidence collection is integrated into the work or learning process where this is appropriate and feasible.
  • Valid: The assessment focuses on the requirements laid down in the standards; i.e. the assessment is fit for purpose.
  • Direct: The activities in the assessment mirror the conditions of actual performance as close as possible.
  • Authentic: The assessor is satisfied that the work being assessed is attributable to the learner being assessed.
  • Sufficient: The evidence collected establishes that all criteria have been met and that performance to the required Standard can be repeated consistently.
  • Systematic: Planning and recording is sufficiently rigorous to ensure that assessment is fair.
  • Open: Learners can contribute to the planning and accumulation of evidence. Learners for assessment understand the assessment process and the criteria that apply.
  • Consistent: The same assessor would make the same judgement again in similar circumstances. The judgement made is similar than the judgement that would be made by other assessors. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  242641  Animate visual elements  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  242546  Compile and present portfolios of work  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Core  242643  Create visual elements for 2D animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  242640  Generate animation breakdowns and timelines  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  242642  Interpret design conventions for animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  242645  Interpret motion conventions for animated elements and camera  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  242648  Present visual breakdown of time structure for animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  242639  Analyse motion  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Fundamental  242651  Develop visual elements for animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Fundamental  242652  Draw from life  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  13943  Analyse new developments reported in the media that could impact on a business sector or industry  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  114551  Analyse performance texts in context  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  120385  Apply a range of project management tools and techniques  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115499  Gather, record and interpret business related information  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117156  Interpret basic financial statements  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120375  Participate in the estimation and preparation of cost budget for a project or sub project and monitor and control actual cost against budget  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114736  Record business financial transactions  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  10056  Analyse and interpret data and marketing information  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15237  Build teams to meet set goals and objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  242638  Composite layers for animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  10041  Conduct a marketing situational analysis  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  115366  Create graphic elements for a multimedia/web-based computer application  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  117855  Design and implement plans to deal with conflict situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  242647  Develop single characters for animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  115171  Generate resources for projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15233  Harness diversity and build on strengths of a diverse working environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  116787  Plan, monitor and control the financial resources for a small company or business unit  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Elective  12140  Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  242541  Render files for animation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120378  Support the project environment and activities to deliver project objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  14 
    Elective  117515  Tender for projects  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. False Bay College 
    2. NEMISA 
    3. South African Film Institute 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.