SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Electro-Mechanics 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
58270  Further Education and Training Certificate: Electro-Mechanics 
ORIGINATOR ORIGINATING PROVIDER
SGB Generic Manufacturing, Engineering, Technology   
QUALITY ASSURING BODY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
The individual Quality Assuring Body for each Learning Programme recorded against this qualification is shown in the table at the end of this report.  The individual NQF Sub-framework for each Learning Programme recorded against this qualification is shown in the table at the end of the qualification report. 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 06 - Manufacturing, Engineering and Technology  Engineering and Related Design 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  171  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 0695/12  2012-07-01  2015-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2016-06-30   2019-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The purpose of this qualification is to build knowledge and skills that are required by employees in an engineering support environment (in various sectors of the economy) that would add value to the qualifying learner in terms of enrichment of the person, status and recognition. It provides an opportunity for learners to learn and apply skills in relation to the workplace.

The FETC Electro-Mechanics (L4) is the culmination of a learning path spanning three qualifications and is intended to produce a highly competent artisan who can perform his/her duties competently and confidently. They will apply electrical, mechanical and industrial electronics engineering skills in order to meet the challenges of a competitive and demanding environment. This qualification will provide learners, education and training providers and employers with the standards and the range of learning required to produce these individuals.

Typical entrants to this qualification could be:
  • Learners who have achieved the L3 qualification and are ready to progress to the L4 qualification.
  • Qualified artisans from one of the "pure" trades such as Electricians or Fitters.

    This qualification will enable the learner to provide advanced maintenance and fault-finding services, typically in a plant or production environment. The status and relevance of this qualification will attract and retain quality learners and employees, who may even have the potential to progress to more advanced qualifications at Technician or Engineer level.

    This qualification can also be attained by means of RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning) thereby enabling recognition of people with existing knowledge and skills. RPL will not only allow a learner to gain credits towards this qualification, but also to move across the different occupational areas.

    The field of electrical and mechanical engineering is characterized by the provision of engineering maintenance, repair and installation services and support in a variety of industries. The production equipment requiring such service and support ranges from basic to highly sophisticated equipment. People working in the electrical and mechanical engineering field require specialised technical skills and knowledge to meet the electrical and mechanical engineering requirements of such diverse industries.

    People credited with this qualification contribute to the maintenance of machinery and equipment by applying both mechanical and electrical knowledge and skills. They are able to:
  • Understand and solve problems by applying mathematical practical applications and communicating in verbal or written form with peers, members of supervisory/management levels and others.
  • Understand and solve problems by applying mathematical practical applications.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the functioning of programmable logic controllers and use them in an Electro-Mechanical context.
  • Apply fault finding techniques to diagnose and repair equipment and machinery during production/operation.
  • Maintain and. repair plant and. equipment.

    The Unit standards in this unit standards-based qualification are intended as building blocks for the further development of skills that will make the learner a more fulfilled, informed, efficient and cost effective worker in the industry. This should result in more efficient service to the customer and make the industry more competitive in the global market.

    After completing this qualification and preferably gaining appropriate working experience, a learner will then be able to progress to the Level (anticipated) level 5 qualification. It will also be possible to articulate to one of the "Pure" trades (such as Fitter or Electrician) or even into a production related qualification.

    This qualification is thus the benchmark for competent people to conduct maintenance activities in a production environment, and also forms the basis for further learning in the field of electrical and mechanical engineering within the higher education and training band.

    Rationale:

    The Engineering sector serves the need of the society and the economy by providing support services in the provision and maintenance of machinery, plant and equipment in industries such as mining, manufacturing, transport and chemicals. These industries are vital to the existence, performance and growth of the South African economy. A healthy economy is in turn vital in terms of the development and upliftment of the country, its infrastructure and its entire people.

    Companies invest considerable sums of money in plant, equipment, processes, raw materials and other resources. These investments can only be justified if the plants and equipment operate to the optimum capacity and efficiency. Stoppages and breakdowns need to be kept to the absolute minimum, as such stoppages lead to undue increases in costs. The effective maintenance and repair of plant and equipment is thus of utmost importance. Competent (qualified) engineering practitioners (engineers, technicians, artisans and supporting staff) are required for this purpose.

    A growing number of industries and companies within industries are moving towards applying "millwrights" in maintenance situations, especially where engineering support services are rendered on a shift basis, e.g. in continuous process operations. "Multi-skilled" artisans, or millwrights as they are commonly known, could thus work on shift together with operations staff, performing maintenance support and even doing routine maintenance while on shift. This is in contrast to the more traditional practice of having artisans like fitters and electricians on standby. Millwrights are particularly useful in smaller organizations which cannot afford to employ e.g. both a Fitter and Electrician.

    Through its design this qualification will meet the needs of learners in the Engineering sector (or those wish to enter the Engineering sector) who require technical expertise and essential knowledge needed to earn a formal qualification relevant to electro-mechanics.

    The FETC Electro-Mechanics L4 will produce competent learners who are able to contribute to improved productivity and efficiency within the sector. They will be able to work with due care to Occupational Health and Safety requirements, while maintaining the relevant quality standards, which are particularly important in the engineering sector.

    This qualification will enhance the status, productivity and employability of the learner within the engineering sector as well as contribute to quality, production rate and growth. This allows for access, progression, portability and mobility within and between the different sectors to which the engineering sector provides maintenance services. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that learners attempting this qualification are competent in the following:
  • Communication and Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 3.
  • Outcomes required for NC Electro-Mechanics Level 3.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    This qualification can be achieved wholly or in part through recognition of prior learning in terms of the criteria laid out above.

    Evidence can be presented in a variety of forms, including international or previous local qualifications, reports, testimonials mentioning functions performed, work records, portfolios, videos of practice and performance records.

    Access to the Qualification:

    There is open access to the qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    FUNDAMENTAL COMPONENT

    The Fundamental Component consists of Unit Standards in:
  • Mathematical Literacy at Level 4 to the value of 16 credits;
  • Communication at Level 4 in a First South African Language to the value of 20 credits;
  • Communication in a Second South African Language at Level 3 to the value of 20 credits

    It is compulsory therefore for learners to do Communication in two different South African languages, one at Level 4 and the other at Level 3.

    All Unit Standards in the Fundamental Component are compulsory.

    CORE COMPONENT

    The Core Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 103 credits all of which are compulsory.

    ELECTIVE COMPONENT

    The Elective Component consists of a number of specializations each with its own set of Unit Standards. Learners are to choose a specialization area and must choose Elective Unit Standards to the value of 12 credits from the Unit standards listed under that specialization so as to attain a minimum of 171 credits for the Qualification.

    Mining and Minerals specialization (Learning Programme ID 60295):

    Learners are to choose Elective Unit Standards to the value of at least 12 credits from the list below:
  • 10621, Identify the correct phase sequence on high voltage transformers and cables, Level 3, 3 credits
  • 243773, Repair an air compressor, Level 3, 10 credits
  • 13303, Align machines and equipment using laser technology, Level 4, 6 credits
  • 113880, Inspect, test and maintain Medium / High Voltage transformers, Level 4, 6 credits
  • 13325, Maintain gearboxes, Level 4, 10 credits
  • 13326, Maintain safety valves, Level 4, 4 credits
  • 10791, Troubleshoot the hydraulic system of a self propelled mobile machine, Level 3, 6 credits
  • 116656, Repair a rotary packer, Level 3, 2 credits
  • 110384, Repair an electronic control system for an AC multi-speed motor, Level 3, 6 credits

    Manufacturing and Engineering specialisation (Learning Programme ID 66770):
  • 10621, Identify the correct phase sequence on high voltage transformers and cables, Level 3, 3 credits
  • 243773, Repair an air compressor, Level 3, 10 credits
  • 110384, Repair an electronic control system for an AC multi-speed motor, Level 3, 6 credits
  • 13303, Align machines and equipment using laser technology, Level 4, 6 credits
  • 113969, Inspect, record and report condition of Medium / High Voltage station apparatus and related equipment, Level 4, 6 credits
  • 113880, Inspect, test and maintain Medium / High Voltage transformers, Level 4, 6 credits
  • 13325, Maintain gearboxes, Level 4, 10 credits
  • 13326, Maintain safety valves, Level 4, 4 credits 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Understand and solve problems by applying mathematical practical applications and communicating in verbal or written form with peers, members of supervisory/management levels and others.
    2. Understand and solve problems by applying mathematical practical applications.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the functioning of programmable logic controllers and use them in an Electro-Mechanical context.
    4. Apply fault finding techniques to diagnose and repair equipment and machinery during production/operation.
    5. Maintain and repair plant and. equipment.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:
  • Identifying and solving problems in which responses display that responsible decisions using critical thinking have been made.
    > Exit Level Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5.
  • Working effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organization and community.
    > Exit Level Outcomes 1, 3, 4, 5.
  • Organising and managing oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively.
    > Exit Level Outcomes 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • Collecting, analyzing, organizing and critically evaluating information.
    > Exit Level Outcomes 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • Communicating effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language skills.
    > Exit Level Outcome 1.
  • Using science and technology effectively and critically, showing responsibility toward the environment and health of others.
    > Exit Level Outcomes 2, 3, 4.
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognizing that problem contexts do not exist in isolation.
    > Exit Level Outcomes 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • Contributing to the full personal development of each learner and the social and economic development of society at large, by making it an underlying intention of the programme of learning to make an individual aware of:
    > Exit Level Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
    > Reflecting on and exploring a variety of strategies to learn more effectively.
    > Participating as responsible citizens in the life of local, national and global communities.
    > Being culturally and aesthetically sensitive across a range of contexts.
    > Exploring education and career opportunities.
    > Developing entrepreneurial opportunities. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    1.
  • Effective verbal communication is used in the interaction with other role players in the maintenance process to determine and understand the extent of maintenance problems, find and implement solutions and giving and getting feedback.
  • Effective written communication is used in order to understand, evaluate and report on maintenance problems.
  • Technical reading skills are applied in order to understand engineering and related information.
  • Technical writing skills are applied in order to record engineering and related information.

    2.
  • Mathematical principles and techniques are used to solve problems with regards to e.g."
    > General and. personal finance.
    > Statistics and. probability.
    > Other practical applications such as motoring, building.
  • Mathematical principles and techniques are applied while performing tasks in the engineering context in respect of calculations relating to e.g.:
    > Electrical calculations.
    > Geometric shapes applied to design of structures.
    > Mass, volume, temperature, pressure.

    3.
  • A working knowledge of the design and functioning of PLC's is demonstrated.
  • PLC's are maintained and cared for in accordance with manufacturers specification.
  • PLC's are used to determine the cause of Inappropriately functioning plant, equipment and systems.
  • PLC's are programmed to ensure optimum performance of the equipment they are controlling.

    4.
  • Faultfinding techniques are applied to establish the cause of plant, equipment and systems not functioning to the relevant specifications.
  • Complex engineering sketches and drawings are used to understand plant, equipment and systems and trace the causes of problems.
  • The cause of the problem is identified and appropriate remedies applied or recommended.
  • Inspection and testing is conducted to ensure that the plant, equipment and systems have been restored and the cause of the problem rectified.
  • Advanced electrical, mechanical and industrial electronics principles and techniques are applied to trace, understand and rectify problems related to plant, machinery and systems.

    5.
  • Plant and equipment are maintained and repaired to the relevant standards and in accordance with manufacturers specifications.
  • Plant and equipment are maintained in accordance with the relevant maintenance philosophy.
  • Work is done in accordance with the relevant occupational health and safety, environmental, quality assurance and other requirements.
  • Cooperation with operations, engineering and other personnel (teamwork) is effective and constructive.
  • Work is planned, scheduled and evaluated in accordance with the relevant procedures and standards.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Integrated assessment at the level of the qualification provides an opportunity for learners to show they are able to integrate concepts, actions and. ideas achieved across a range of unit standards and contexts.

    Integrated assessment must evaluate the quality of observable performance as well as the thinking behind the performance, and must be based on an assessment guide. The guide will spell out how the assessor will assess different aspects of the performance and will include:
  • Observing the learner at work (both in the primary activity as well as other interactions).
  • Asking questions and initiating short discussions to test understanding.
  • Looking at records and reports in the portfolio and reviewing previous assessments.

    In some cases inference will be necessary to determine competence depending on the nature and context within which performance takes place.

    It is necessary to ensure that the fundamental part of the qualification is also targeted to ensure that while the competence may have been achieved in a particular context, learners are able to apply it in a range of other contexts and for future learning. The assessment should also ensure that all the critical cross-field outcomes have been achieved.

    The learner may choose in which language s/he wants to be assessed. This should be established as part of a process of preparing the learner for assessment and familiarising the learner with the approach being taken.

    While this is primarily a workplace-based qualification, evidence from other areas of endeavour may be introduced if pertinent to any of the exit-level outcomes. The assessment process should cover both the explicit tasks required for the qualification as well as the understanding of the concepts and principles that underpin the activities associated with electro-mechanical engineering. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    This qualification has been titled "NC Electro Mechanics" and does not use the colloquial term "millwright" in its definitions. The purpose of this is on one hand to be more accurate in terms of the title, and on the other to prevent any confusion or restriction that may be caused by different interpretations of the term "millwright" across different industries. However, in benchmarking the proposed qualification against international ones, we refer (below) to terms such as "millwright" and "flexi-trade" as used in the international context.

    The learning outcomes of the FETC Electro-Mechanics L4 compare well to the advanced requirements of similar international qualifications in terms of:
  • Content: The qualifications from the various countries all address mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, industrial electronic (PLC) and other related competencies.
  • Progression: The qualifications all address a progression of competencies, e.g. Replace components (L2), Maintain and repair (L3) and Programme systems (PLC's) (L4). At NQF Level 4 the learning outcomes compare to the final years (typically partly 3rd and 4th year)s of the apprenticeships found.

    > Year Three:

    > Install Equipment.
    > Explain Leveling and Aligning Procedures

    > Service Power Transmissions.
    > Describe Power Transmission Theory.
    > Service Couplings.
    > Service Gear Types.
    > Service Belt Types.
    > Service Clutches and brakes.
    > Service Chain Drive.

    > Service Fluid Power.
    > Explain Hydraulic Theory.
    > Interpret Hydraulic Schematics.
    > Describe Hydraulic Components.
    > Identify Hydraulic Pumps.
    > Assemble Hydraulic Circuits.
    > Maintain and Troubleshoot Hydraulic Circuits.

    > Service Pumps.
    > Explain Pump Theory.
    > Identify Types of Pumps.
    > Maintain and Troubleshoot Positive Displacement Pumps.
    > Maintain and Troubleshoot Non Positive Displacement Pumps.

    > Year Four:

    > Use Work Practices.
    > Plan Job Requirements.

    > Describe Trade Science.
    > Describe Theory of Electricity and Electronics.

    > Install Equipment.
    > Describe Procedures for Commissioning Equipment.

    > Maintain Prime Movers.
    > Explain Prime Mover Theory.
    > Describe Electric Motors.
    > Maintain Electric Motors.
    > Describe Internal Combustion Engines.
    > Describe the Maintenance of Internal Combustion Engines.
    > Describe Turbines.
    > Describe the Maintenance of Turbines.

    > Service Power Transmissions.
    > Describe Power Turbines.

    > Service Fluid Power.
    > Explain Pneumatic Theory.
    > Describe Pneumatic Components.
    > Interpret Pneumatic Schematics.
    > Identify Pneumatic Pumps.
    > Assemble Pneumatic Circuits.
    > Maintain and Troubleshoot Pneumatic Circuits.
    > Explain the Theory of Vacuum Systems.
    > Interpret Vacuum Symbols.
    > Identify Vacuum System Components.
    > Describe Vacuum Systems.
    > Maintain and Troubleshoot Vacuum Systems.

    > Describe Compressors.
    > Explain Compressor Theory.
    > Identify Types of Compressors.
    > Describe Positive Displacement Compressor Theory.
    > Describe Non-Positive Displacement Compressor theory.

    > Service Material Handling Systems.
    > Maintain Fans and Blowers.

    > Service HVAC and Pollution Control Equipment.
    > Describe Theory of Pollution Control.
    > Describe the Different Methods of Pollution Control.
    > Maintain Pollution Control Equipment.
    > Describe Methods of Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC).

    > Describe Operational Equipment Effectiveness.
    > Describe Operational Equipment Effectiveness Processes.
    > Create Problem Solving Flow Charts.
    > Describe Theory of Maintenance Procedures.
    > Describe Types of maintenance.
    > Describe Use of Predictive Maintenance Tools.
    > Identify Equipment and Process Deficiencies.
    > Perform Vibration Analysis and Rotating equipment Balancing.
  • Duration: Depending on entry requirements, the various apprenticeships/learnerships for the relevant outcomes span a period of 3-4 years.
  • Learning delivery: The learning delivery process in all the examples included on-the-job (practical) and off-the-job (theoretical) components.
  • Outcomes-Based: All the examples found either directly or indirectly comply with principles of outcomes-based learning, particularly in terms of outcomes (modules) representing meaningful units of learning and assessment being conducted continuously. There is generally a final integrated assessment, typically called a trade test, where the candidate is required to demonstrate specific and core (cross-field) knowledge and skills. While the U.S. example does not specifically refer to outcomes-based learning, this should be seen in the context of the USA being at the forefront of Competency-based training since the 1970's. The term "competency-based" is often used interchangeably with "outcomes-based" or "standards-based".
  • Apprenticeship/Learnership: In all the examples found, learning is vocational-based. In some countries (Scotland, New Zealand) these are called "modern apprenticeships". Learners are engaged in a formal contract of learning and most learning is workplace-based. In most cases learners "earn while they learn".
  • Application (Purpose): As is the intention with the South African qualifications, the international qualifications all prepare learners for working in process or manufacturing oriented industries where they contribute to the effective and efficient maintenance of plant and equipment.
  • Status: In all countries researched "millwrights" are sought after individuals and their skills are highly rated.

    In benchmarking the proposed Electro-Mechanical Qualifications against international qualifications, we looked for examples in different parts of the world:
  • Canada was chosen in as much it represents a multicultural society (French and British) and its proximity and similarity to the United States of America.
  • The United States was chosen because it has one of the largest economies of the world.
  • Botswana was chosen because it is a neighbouring country (part of the SADEC community) with a stable socio-economical system.
  • South Africa - We also looked at a variety of millwright applications from the era before the current skills development dispensation.

    Canada:

    The following information was obtained on the website: http://www.logos-net.net/Skills with regards to "flexi training" programmes.

    Niagara College, the Lincoln County Board of Education and the Ontario Training and Adjustment Board trained learners for work as millwrights in pipefitting, electrical trades, instrumentation, machining and welding. The concept of "Flex-Trades" was intended to train workers to perform tasks to agreed levels within their associated trade area. For example, a trained millwright would be able to carry out welding and pipefitting tasks up to the agreed level, depending on the individual's competence. The Flex-Trades concept will allow for more efficient use of personnel within the mechanical and electrical (maintenance) areas. In addition, each tradesperson will gain a higher skill level and an understanding of interdisciplinary relations.

    Information regarding training was also found on the website of the British Columbia Institute of Technology (www.bcit.ca). The full millwright qualification is obtained over a four-year period. The "job description" of the millwright is in essence similar to the basic purpose of the proposed Electro-Mechanical qualifications:
  • "Millwrights are often described as masters of all trades as they are expected to install, maintain and repair all types of machinery in almost any industry. Millwrights install, repair, overhaul and maintain all types of machinery and heavy mechanical equipment".

    Conclusion: The term "Flexi-trades" can be used interchangeably with the term "millwright" as intended in the proposed Electro-Mechanic qualifications. The qualifications developed for the South African industries serve a similar purpose.

    United States:

    The millwright trade is very strong in the USA and highly organized in terms of union representation. The site of Union Millwrights (www.unionmillwright.com) describes the function and training (apprenticeship) of millwrights in similar vein to the purpose of the Electro-Mechanical qualifications, i.e. multi-skilled artisans receiving their training by means of apprenticeships which include on-the-job and off-the-job (theoretical) components.

    The site of the University of Virginia (www.ccps.virginia.edu) also gives good descriptions of the tasks performed by millwrights, knowledge and skills required:
  • "They fit bearings, align gears and wheels, attach motors and connect belts according to the manufacturer's specifications. Precision levelling and alignment are important to getting the job right. As the machinery is put into use, millwrights perform preventive maintenance and fix broken or malfunctioning parts.
  • This type of work requires many different skills. Millwrights need to understand how machines work, be able to follow drawings and blueprints, use precision assembly equipment, and calculate angles and measurement.
  • They also need to know how to use power tools, cutting torches, welding machines, and soldering guns. In addition to old-fashioned tools, they must know something about computers since more machinery, controls and equipment-testing has become computerized. Much of their work is performed under pressure, since a machine or the entire production process may have to be halted to complete installation, repairs or maintenance.

    Conclusion: The proposed Electro-Mechanical qualifications are in line with the US examples.

    Botswana:

    In Botswana Millwrights are trained through the apprenticeship system. The length and duration of the practical and theoretical components differ slightly to the South African apprenticeship system, but the learning outcomes are similar for example millwrights with fitting and electrical competences are trained as they is a great need for them in the country.

    South Africa:

    The term "millwright" in the former Skills Development dispensation in South Africa had different meanings in different contexts, which is why this term is not being used in the proposed qualifications.

    Formerly, millwrights were trained by larger industrial organisations such as:
  • Iscor - typical heavy industrial application.
  • SATS (Railways) - petrol and diesel.
  • SASOL - process application.
  • Unilever - manufacturing plant application.

    With the decline in the training of artisans over the past decade or so, there has been a drastic decline in the training of millwrights and one of the objectives of this qualification is to reintroduce the training of this valuable trade albeit in the guise of Electro-Mechanics.

    Generic conclusions:

    While there are different definitions referring to millwrights and their "job descriptions" all over the world, there is sufficient consensus that it refers to a multi-skilled artisan responsible for installation, maintenance and repair of plant and equipment typically in an industrial or process environment.

    In terms of training and qualification, it is clear that a learner will obtain a specific qualification (Millwright) after a vocational learning process (apprenticeship or learnership) of 3-4 years.

    Typical outcomes of the various Millwright training programmes are:
  • Maintain and repair production or processing machines and equipment with minimal downtime.
  • Check, set up and operate various types of production tools and equipment prior to approving for production use.
  • Report any information that may impede the operation of the plant as soon as it becomes known.
  • Practice safe work habits.
  • Basic training and skills in Industrial Electronics and application of those skills to plant electronic problems or demonstrate industrial electronic ability.
  • Understand and apply knowledge about most commonly used programmable controllers or demonstrate ability to work with programmable controllers.
  • Thoroughly understand and apply knowledge to troubleshoot all types of AC and DC.
  • Control Systems or demonstrate electrical troubleshooting abilities.
  • Troubleshoot all types of DC drives.

    Conclusion: These outcomes are covered within the L2, L3 and L4 certificates developed for South Africa.

    Millwrights are highly sought after individuals who make valuable contributions to the industries in which they work, as effective and efficient maintenance is important to the safe and efficient operation of plant and equipment. A trained millwright is not restricted to working in a particular industry or environment only, but can easily adapt to different working environments. Some "conversion learning" may be required e.g. when moving from one process to another, but the core competencies will largely be the same across different industries. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This qualification allows for both vertical and horizontal articulation.

    Horizontal articulation exists with:
  • ID 23256: FETC: Mechanical Engineering: Fitting and Machining, NQF Level 4.
  • ID 48474: FETC: Electrical Engineering, NQF Level 4.

    Vertical articulation exists with:
  • National Diploma Mechanical Engineering NQF Level 5.
  • ID 49061: National Certificate: Master Craftsmanship (Electrical), NQF Level 5. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against the qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, Assurance (ETQA) Body, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, Assurance (ETQA) Body, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant Education, Training, Quality, Assurance (ETQA) Body, or by an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA, according to the ETQA's policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described in the associated unit standards
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessors should be in possession of:
  • An appropriate qualification at or above the level of the qualification and preferably relevant workplace practical experience.
  • Registration as an assessor with the relevant ETQA. 

  • NOTES 
    As per the SAQA decision, after consultation with the Quality Councils, to re-register all qualifications and part qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework that meet the criteria for re-registration, this qualification has been re-registered from 1 July 2012.
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  113899  Demonstrate an understanding of basic programmable logic controllers  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  13327  Diagnose and repair faults on equipment and machinery during production/operation  Level 4  NQF Level 04  24 
    Core  12414  Diagnose and repair faults on low voltage transformers and equipment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  116046  Fault find and repair Equipment associated with Final Control Elements  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Core  10259  Fault find, repair and maintain three phase voltage electrical circuits  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  13321  Maintain fluid power / pneumatic systems  Level 4  NQF Level 04  16 
    Core  13818  Maintain low voltage switchgear  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  13328  Refurbish machines  Level 4  NQF Level 04  24 
    Core  113897  Troubleshoot on programmable logic controllers  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119467  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119462  Engage in sustained oral/signed communication and evaluate spoken/signed texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119469  Read/view, analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9016  Represent analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119471  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119459  Write/present/sign for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  10621  Identify the correct phase sequence on high voltage transformers and cables  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  116656  Repair a rotary packer  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  243773  Repair an air compressor  Level 3  NQF Level 03  10 
    Elective  110384  Repair an electronic control system for an AC multi-speed motor  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  10791  Troubleshoot the hydraulic system of a self-propelled mobile machine  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  13303  Align machines and equipment using laser technology  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  113969  Inspect, record and report condition of Medium / High Voltage station apparatus and related equipment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  113880  Inspect, test and maintain Medium / High Voltage transformers  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13325  Maintain gearboxes  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  13326  Maintain safety valves  Level 4  NQF Level 04 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    LP ID Learning Programme Title Provider Pre-2009
    NQF Level
    NQF Level Min Credits Learning Prog End Date Quality
    Assuring
    Body
    NQF Sub-Framework
    66770  Further Education and Training Certificate: Electro-Mechanics: Manufacturing and Engineering  Generic Provider - Field 06  Level 4  NQF Level 04  171     MERSETA  OQSF 
    60295  Further Education and Training Certificate: Electro-Mechanics: Mining and Minerals  Generic Provider - Field 06  Level 4  NQF Level 04  171     MQA  OQSF 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THESE LEARNING PROGRAMMES: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Quality Assuring Bodies have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Quality Assuring Body should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    LP ID Learning Programme Title Accredited Provider
    66770  Further Education and Training Certificate: Electro-Mechanics: Manufacturing and Engineering  1. Blue Horison Properties 53 (Pty) Ltd T/A Durnacol Skills Innovation Hu
    2. COLLIERY TRAINING COLLEGE
    3. Inncor Training & Development (Pty) Ltd (VEREENIGING) (TP)  
    60295  Further Education and Training Certificate: Electro-Mechanics: Mining and Minerals  1. A&R ENGINEERING & MINING SUPPLIES PTY LTD
    2. Adcorp Technical Training
    3. FOSKOR Pty Ltd
    4. GFBLA
    5. HARMONY GOLD MINING COMPANY LIMITED
    6. Palabora Copper Pty Ltd
    7. SASOL GLOBAL LEARNING
    8. SECUNDA STEENKOOLMYNE SP  



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.