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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Professional Hunting 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
58930  Further Education and Training Certificate: Professional Hunting 
ORIGINATOR ORIGINATING PROVIDER
SGB Nature Conservation   
QUALITY ASSURING BODY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CATHSSETA - Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 01 - Agriculture and Nature Conservation  Nature Conservation 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  133  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 0695/12  2012-07-01  2015-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2016-06-30   2019-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The Further Education and Training Certificate: Professional Hunting, addresses the skills and competencies enabling qualifying, licensing and registration as a Professional Hunter to access employment opportunities in the hunting environment in South Africa.

The professional hunter is both an ambassador for the country and the provider of a business service, and the purpose of the qualification is to equip learners with the knowledge, skills, values and qualities to successfully fulfil these roles.

After successful completion of this qualification learners will be able to:
  • Operate in the Professional Hunting environment.
  • Apply legislative requirements applicable to Professional Hunting.
  • Handle and maintain weapons for hunting purposes.
  • Maintain hunting ethics and traditions in the operational environment.
  • Interact with clients in the Professional Hunting environment.
  • Execute a hunting experience according to industry standards.
  • Deal with hunting trophies in the correct manner.

    Rationale:

    The Professional Hunting industry is characterized by the delivery of hunting services to national and international clients and contributes significantly to the country's foreign exchange earnings, a contribution in access of R 800 million per annum.

    The Professional Hunting sector requires standardization of training and development in order to register with relevant Professional Hunting Bodies and training against a recognized qualification is embedded in the Firearms Control Act as a requirement. In addition to this legislation, the sector is furthermore regulated by Nature Conservation legislation in terms of protected species. The acquiring of recognized skills and abilities is therefore required by the sector in order to meet legislative requirements and to remain profitable in order to increase growth and job opportunities.

    This qualification enables the qualifying learner to ensure that every aspect of a hunting experience is carried on within the parameters of the law. It focuses strongly on the rejection of unethical hunting practices, and promotes awareness of the conservation of the natural environment. In addition the qualification encompasses learning programmes that has come to be the accepted standard for licensing new professional hunters in the industry.

    The qualification is designed to provide the skills and abilities for people who are both experienced recreational plains game hunters required to register for this purpose but will also enable progression from dedicated hunter to professional hunter status for individuals following a career path in this sector. Training and development to address access and redress in this sector where transformation is not yet evident will also be enabled by this qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    To complete this qualification the learner must have 56 Fundamental, 67 Core and a minimum of 10 credits from the Elective category to total 133 credits. 

    EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Operate in a Professional Hunting environment.

    2. Interact with clients.

    3. Execute a hunting experience with clients.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    The qualification addresses the following Critical Cross-Field Outcomes as embedded in the Exit Level Outcomes and Associated Assessment Criteria of the qualification:

    Communicate effectively:
  • Effective communication is enabled through client interaction, the briefing of clients and communication related to the execution of a hunting experience with clients.
  • Refer to all Exit Level Outcomes.

    Identify and solve problems:
  • The execution of hunting activities within the context of a hunting experience being concluded according to client's needs and requirements require the identification and solving of problems associated with the hunting environment.
  • Refer to all Exit Level Outcomes.

    Collect, analyse, organise, and critically evaluate information:
  • The evaluation of a broad range of information in the planning of a hunting experience takes place within the context of client interaction, operation in the environment in which the hunt takes place and also occurs in the execution of the hunting experience.
  • Refer to all Exit Level Outcomes.

    Understand the world as a set of related systems:
  • The applying of various sets of information and operating within the natural hunting environment supports understanding of the world as a set of related systems.
  • Refer to Exit Level Outcomes 2 and 3.

    Organise and manage own activities:
  • The preparation and conducting of a hunting experience within the legislative and operational frameworks of the activity promotes and supports the organising and management of own activities.
  • Refer to Exit Level Outcomes 1 and 3.

    Work in a team:
  • The planning and execution of a hunting experience to meet the needs and requirement of the client supports teamwork in the successful completion of the hunting experience.
  • Refer to all Exit Level Outcomes.

    Maintain effective working relationships:
  • The maintaining of effective working relationships is essential in addressing of client needs and requirements associated with the planning and execution of a successful professional hunting experience.
  • Refer to Exit Level Outcomes 1 and 3.

    Use technology:
  • The use and application of weapons as well as electronic communication and interaction with international clients require the use of technology within the context of this qualification.
  • Refer to all Exit Level Outcomes. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 Applicable legislative requirements and boundaries are identified and maintained as they apply to the Professional Hunting environment.
    1.2 Weapons are handled and maintained in accordance with legislative, safety and operational requirements.
    1.3 Ethical principles and time-honoured traditions are applied as they pertain to the Professional Hunting environment.
    1.4 Health and safety principles and standards are maintained as they apply to the Professional Hunting environment.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 Factors impacting on clients are identified and explained as they apply to their participating in a professional hunting experience.
    2.2 Communication skills are used effectively when interacting with clients.
    2.3 Client interaction is performed to ensure good service as it applies to the hunting experience.
    2.4 Client arrival and departure are concluded according to operational requirements.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 Clients and hunting staff are briefed with regard to logistical concerns and contingencies that arise as it applies to the hunting experience.
    3.2 The hunting experience is executed with clients according to logistical arrangements as well as legislative, safety and operational requirements.
    3.3 Wildlife behaviour is correctly interpreted for the purpose of the hunting experience.
    3.4 Tracking skills are effectively employed in the pursuit of huntable trophy wild animals.
    3.5 Hunting trophies are appropriately dealt with in the process of being skinned, handled, treated and dispatched.
    3.6 The hunting experience is concluded according to operational requirements.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Integrated assessment at this level will evaluate the learner's ability to combine actions and ideas across a range of activities and knowledge areas. The integrated assessment must specifically assess the learner's ability to:
  • Demonstrate competence by means of the practical application of the embedded knowledge in a manner that meets the required performance standards required.
  • Illustrate a clear understanding of the concepts, theory and principles that underpin the practical action taken.

    The assessment may require assessment methods, which take evidence generated during on-the job activities into account. Because assessment practices must be open, transparent, fair, valid and reliable; ensuring that no learner is disadvantaged in any way whatsoever, an integrated assessment approach is incorporated into the qualification.

    A variety of methods must be used in assessment and tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working or will work. Where it is not possible to assess the learner in the workplace simulations, case studies, role-plays and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.

    The term, integrated assessment implies that theoretical and practical components should be assessed together. Whenever possible the assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values shown in the Unit Standards should be integrated and, during integrated assessment, the assessor should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment tools and methods. Combinations of practical, applied, and foundational competencies should be assessed.

    Assessment should further ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes are evaluated in an integrated way.

    Assessors must assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience as the assessment process is capable of being applied to RPL, subject to the rules and criteria of the relevant ETQA. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Although hunting activities and practices take place in many parts of the world, International comparison for the Further Education and Training Certificate: Professional Hunting was challenged by the following factors:
  • Due to heavy industrialization, dense human populations and very little open areas available to hunting in Western Europe and Britain, opportunities for Professional Hunting does not exist and no specific training associated with professional hunting is therefore available from this area.
  • Amateur/recreational hunting is practiced, however, in some of these countries, e.g. Spain, Germany, Rumanie, etc. Training provision, if available is mainly elementary and focused on the amateur/recreational hunter - no specific comparison within the context of professional hunting is therefore possible.
  • Professional Hunting takes place on a relatively large scale in the USA, Canada and certain countries in South America. In the case of the USA, professional hunting is practiced mainly in the State of Alaska. Training for professional hunting taking place in Canada is based on the USA methodologies.
  • Comparison with developing countries in South America was not possible due to information being available mostly in Spanish and Portuguese where obtainable. Professional Hunting training in these developing countries is also not regarded as a priority and therefore usually not formalised.
  • On the African subcontinent, professional hunting takes place in Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Tanzania, and elsewhere in French speaking West African countries. Training in those countries is however not outcomes based and is predominantly apprenticeship based e.g. Zimbabwe). Hunting from a professional perspective in Zimbabwe is mainly focused on the Big Five at the expense of "plains game" which in South Africa is the core focal area.

    Within the context of the above - the general lack of suitable comparisons, as well as the fact that the range of species hunted in South Africa and the hunting environment in South Africa are unique, comparison in terms of best practices was concluded mainly against professional and amateur hunting qualifications in the United States of America. (Amateur hunting qualifications in South Africa are administered by the major local hunting associations, and have been duly considered).

    United States:

    Two specific training programmes were used for comparison:
  • The Hunter qualification of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game: wildlife Conservation that is accepted in all the States of the United States of America, Canada and Mexico.
  • The learning programme of the Kentucky Department of Wildlife Resources: Hunter Education.

    The First qualification involves the following learning components:
  • Fire-arm safety.
  • Conservation.
  • Landowners rights.
  • Rights and safety of other hunters.
  • Ethics and respect for natural resources.
  • Inclusion of bow hunting and muzzle loading application in terms of hunting.

    The second qualification incorporates:
  • Hunting theory.
  • Fire-arms proficiency.
  • Hunting techniques.
  • Survival techniques.
  • Hunting safety.
  • Wildlife education.

    The Envisaged FETC: Professional Hunting compares well in terms of the inclusion of fire-arms proficiency and handling, the maintaining of safety, ethics and traditions and wildlife behaviour also compares well. As can be expected, the wildlife and conservation component within a South African context is obviously larger due to the larger diversity of available species for trophy hunting. The South African qualification also places a bigger emphasis on legislative requirements due to the South African requirements in this regard.

    Pennsylvania Game Commission Education Programme:

    The Pennsylvania Game Commission Education Programme was compared. The programme consists of a series of shorter learning programmes incorporating:
  • Gaming legislation.
  • Trapping.
  • Safety.
  • Firearm safety.
  • Hunting ethics.
  • Hunting skills.
  • First Aid.
  • Wildlife management and conservation.
  • Hunting legislation.
  • Fur taking.
  • Wildlife identification.
  • Field care of wild game.

    The envisaged South African qualification compares well in terms of:
  • Hunting legislation which incorporates conservation.
  • Firearm safety and weapons utilization in the hunting environment.
  • Ethical behaviour and traditions in the hunting environment.
  • Hunting skills and the interpretation of wildlife behaviour.
  • Skinning, handling, treating and dispatching of hunting trophies.
  • Assess and record the quality and size of trophy animals.

    In addition the South African qualification also focuses on:
  • Effective client briefing which focuses on safety.
  • Client services in terms of arrival and departure of clients.

    Conclusion:

    The South African qualification compares very well with international qualifications in terms of general contents.

    Qualifications scrutinized in some instances focus on first aid, which is not included in the South African qualification. Duration of international learning interventions are much shorter in most instances, making the South African qualification more comprehensive in terms of the depth of learning and application achieved. This is obviously necessary within the context of the larger scope of available species as well as the uniqueness of the hunting terrain from a South African perspective.

    The most common areas that are shared when conducting a comparison are certainly an emphasis in terms of human well-being and safety as well as concerns for conservation and the welfare of wildlife. In terms of the latter, comparison is on par. The specific practical focus of the South African qualification in comparison with a high focus on theoretical assessment in some of the international qualifications is seen as an advantage.

    South Africa's substantial biodiversity offers in excess of 30 species, including the big five, in comparison with European Countries (For example: Norway - four species and Germany - five species). In addition, the conditions of hunting within a South African context are also unique in terms of the African Savanna and plains in which hunting takes place. When comparing the unique position, biodiversity and landscape accessed by the South African Professional Hunter it is not far-fetched to consider South Africa as a leader in this field. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification provides the following articulation opportunities:

    Vertical articulation:
  • ID 20416; National Certificate: Conservation: Natural Resource Management: Terrestrial, NQF Level 5.

    Horizontal articulation:
  • ID 20155; National Certificate: Tourism: Guiding, NQF Level 4. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone moderating assessment of a learner, against this Qualification must be registered as a moderator with the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that may enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment may be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation of that ETQA, in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between various ETQAs (including professional bodies), and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed immediately below.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at all exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual Unit Standards as well as the integrated competence described in the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this Qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Anyone assessing a learner, against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.

    For an applicant to register as an assessor or moderator of this Qualification the applicant needs:
  • To be declared competent in all the outcomes of the National Assessor Unit Standards.
  • To be competent in the outcomes of this Qualification. 

  • NOTES 
    As per the SAQA decision, after consultation with the Quality Councils, to re-register all qualifications and part qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework that meet the criteria for re-registration, this qualification has been re-registered from 1 July 2012.
    In the event that a learner wishes to expand their scope to the hunting of dangerous game, the following three elective unit standards become compulsory:
  • Plan a dangerous game hunt, 10 credits.
  • Hunt a dangerous animal, 10 credits.
  • Trail a wounded dangerous animal, 10 credits. 

  • UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  246418  Assess and record the quality and size of a trophy animal  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  246422  Comply to current Legislation impacting on hunting  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  246416  Demonstrate an understanding of ethics and traditions pertaining to the hunting of wild animals  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  246413  Hunt wild animals with a client  Level 4  NQF Level 04  13 
    Core  246421  Interpret wildlife behaviour for hunting  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Core  246419  Manage and maintain weapons for hunting  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  9243  Monitor occupational health and safety  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  8551  Oversee arrival and departure of customers  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  246414  Provide instruction to clients and hunting staff  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  246412  Skin, handle, treat and dispatch hunting trophies  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119466  Interpret a variety of literary texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7484  Describe, represent, analyse and explain changes in shape and motion in 2- and 3-dimensional space with justification  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119470  Evaluate literary texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119461  Make and motivate judgements on selected literary texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119469  Read/view, analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119459  Write/present/sign for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115409  Assist with tasks related to marketing, market research and promotions  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  8553  Operate in a business  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  246415  Plan a dangerous game hunt  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  246420  Plan a recreational hunting experience  Level 4  NQF Level 04  15 
    Elective  246417  Pursue a dangerous game quarry  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  9242  Analyse external factors influencing people who have special needs  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  8665  Lead a team  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Quality Assuring Bodies have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Quality Assuring Body should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. Game Tech Hunters Training 
    2. North West Park & Tourism Board 
    3. Southern African Wildlife College 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.