SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Criminology 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
61451  Further Education and Training Certificate: Criminology 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Criminology and Criminal Justice 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
SAS SETA - Safety and Security SETA  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 08 - Law, Military Science and Security  Safety in Society 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  143  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 10105/14  2015-07-01  2018-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2019-06-30   2022-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification replaces: 
Qual ID Qualification Title Pre-2009 NQF Level NQF Level Min Credits Replacement Status
48856  Further Education and Training Certificate: Criminology  Level 4  NQF Level 04  143  Complete 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

Learners who have achieved this qualification will be capable of combining a range of self-organisation and life long skills which will empower them to explore a variety of career opportunities in South Africa and internationally in the social, political, economic, legal and ecological spheres to ensure safety in society.

A learner acquiring this qualification will have skills, knowledge and experience to:
  • Describe the South African Criminal Justice System.
  • Measure conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.
  • Apply programmes and strategies to prevent/reduce conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation in the micro-environment.
  • Describe rights in terms of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.
  • Review vulnerability relating to lifestyle patterns.
  • Describe the impact of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.

    Rationale:

    This qualification is intended to equip learners/persons with an interest in conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation and communities in general, with the knowledge in conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation that is needed for creating and maintaining safety in society. Conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation in South Africa have severe consequences for the sustained development of society, the economy and ecology. This qualification will provide knowledge of crime and victimisation to enable learners to deal effectively with conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation and ensure a democratic and just society within a human rights framework as envisaged in the South African Constitution and Bill of Rights. Learners completing this qualification will be able to use their knowledge in various fields of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation and to prevent/reduce crime in the social and corporate sphere. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that the learner has the following knowledge and skills:
  • Communication at NQF Level 3.
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 3.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    The structure of this Unit Standard based Qualification makes the Recognition of Prior Learning possible, if the learner is able to demonstrate competence in the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes implicit in this Qualification. Recognition of Prior Learning will be done by means of an Integrated Assessment as mentioned in the previous paragraph.

    This Recognition of Prior Learning may allow:
  • For accelerated access to further learning.
  • Gaining of credits towards a unit standard.

    All recognition of Prior Learning is subject to quality assurance by the relevant accredited Education, Training, Quality, and Assurance Body and is conducted by a registered workplace assessor. Because the standards are only core and fundamental, these standards may have been acquired in a range of economic sectors and these will be recognizes as appropriate.

    Access to the Qualification:

    There is an open access to this qualification, keeping in mind the "Learning Assumed to be in Place". 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The Qualification consists of a Fundamental, a Core and an Elective Component.

    To be awarded the Qualification learners are required to obtain a minimum of 143 credits as detailed below.

    Fundamental Component:

    The Fundamental Component consists of Unit Standards in:
  • Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4 to the value of 16 credits
  • Communication at NQF Level 4 in a First South African Language to the value of 20 credits
  • Communication in a Second South African Language at NQF Level 3 to the value of 20 credits

    It is compulsory therefore for learners to do Communication in two different South African languages, one at Level 4 and the other at NQF Level 3.

    All Unit Standards in the Fundamental Component are compulsory.

    Core Component:

    The Core Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 82 credits all of which are compulsory.

    Elective Component:

    The Elective Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 20 credits. It is compulsory for Learners to choose a Unit Standard/s to the minimum value of 5 credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Describe the South African Criminal Justice System.

    2. Measure conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro environment.

    3. Apply programmes and strategies to prevent/reduce conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation in the micro-environment.

    4. Describe rights in terms of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.

    Range:
  • Rights refers to universal human rights, environmental and ecological rights, social rights, victims charter and constitutional rights.

    5. Review vulnerability relating to lifestyle patterns.

    6. Describe the impact of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    This qualification promotes, in particular, the following Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    Identifying and solving problems in which responses display that responsible decisions using critical and creative thinking have been made when:
  • Measuring conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.
  • Applying programmes and strategies to prevent/reduce conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation in the micro-environment.
  • Reviewing vulnerability relating to lifestyle patterns.

    Working effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation, and community by cooperating, assisting and providing advice when:
  • Measuring conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.
  • Applying programmes and strategies to prevent/reduce conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation in the micro-environment.
  • Reviewing vulnerability relating to lifestyle patterns.

    Organising and managing oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively when:
  • Measuring conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.
  • Applying programmes and strategies to prevent/reduce conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation in the micro-environment.

    Communicate effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language in the modes of oral and/or written persuasion when:
  • Describing the South African Criminal Justice System.
  • Measuring conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.
  • Describing rights in terms of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.
  • Describing the impact of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.

    Collecting, analysing, organising and critically evaluating information to better understand and explain when:
  • Describing the South African Criminal Justice System.
  • Measuring conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.
  • Describing the impact of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.

    Using science and technology effectively and critically, showing responsibility towards the environment and health of others when:
  • Measuring conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the micro-environment.

    Demonstrating an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognising that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation when:
  • Describing the South African Criminal Justice System. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:

    1.1 The different components of criminal justice are described in terms of the South African Criminal Justice System.
    1.2 The interrelation between criminal justice stakeholders is described in terms of the South African Criminal Justice System.
    Range:
  • Stakeholders include private security, law enforcement, courts of law and correctional services.
    1.3 The functioning of criminal justice is described in terms of the South African Criminal Justice System.
    1.4 The role and tasks of the criminal justice stakeholders is described in terms of the South African Criminal Justice System.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:

    2.1 Techniques are identified to measure conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation.
    2.2 Techniques are applied to measure conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation within a micro environment.
    2.3 A report is compiled of the micro-environmental research findings.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:

    3.1 A description is given of the various models available to deal with conflict deviance, crime and victimisation.
    Range:
  • Models include a number of related programmes/strategies.
    3.2 Crime prevention/reduction programmes are selected according to the chosen model.
    3.3 The chosen/selected programme or strategy is implemented according to the chosen model.
    3.4 The implemented programme is evaluated according to its effectiveness.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:

    4.1 An explanation is given of the evolution of rights in terms of international history.
    4.2 An understanding is demonstrated of rights as applied internationally.
    4.3 The responsibilities of individuals are described in terms of their rights.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:

    5.1 Risk factors contributing to conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation are specified at the different levels.
    Range:
  • Levels refers to an individual level, social level and corporate level.
    5.2 Risk factors are reviewed in accordance with specific lifestyle patterns.
    5.3 Vulnerabilities are identified according to lifestyle patterns.
    5.4 Knowledge is demonstrated of strategies that can influence change in lifestyles.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 6:

    6.1 Understanding is demonstrated of the impact of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation at the various levels.
    Range:
  • The various levels refer to individual, social, environmental and ecological levels.
    6.2 The influence of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation is assessed in terms of its impact at the various levels.
    6.3 The seriousness of the impact of conflict, deviance, crime and victimisation is determined at the various levels.
    6.4 Proposals to reduce the impact are determined at the various levels.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Because assessment practices must be open, transparent, fair, valid, and reliable and ensure that no learner is disadvantaged in any way whatsoever, an integrated assessment approach is incorporated into the Qualification. Learning, teaching and assessment are inextricably linked. Whenever possible, the assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values shown in the unit standards should be integrated.

    Assessment of the communication, language, literacy and numeracy should be conducted in conjunction with other aspects and should use authentic selling and specific economic sector contexts wherever possible.

    A variety of methods must be used in assessment and tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working. Where it is not possible to assess the learner in the workplace or on-the-job, simulations, case studies, role-plays and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.

    The term 'Integrated Assessment' implies that theoretical and practical components should be assessed together. During integrated assessments the assessor should make use of formative and summative assessment methods and assess combinations of practical, applied, foundational and reflective competencies.

    Assessors and moderators should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment methods. Assessors should assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience.

    Assessment should ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes are assessed. The assessment of the critical cross-field outcomes should be integrated with the assessment of specific outcomes and embedded knowledge. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Best Practice:

    In 2007 the International Society of Criminology prescribed broad academic guidelines after consultation with members of its national executive, who are internationally represented, to enhance the academic status of criminology.

    The United Kingdom criminology benchmarks were developed in 2006 by the British Society of Criminology in collaboration with the National Quality Assurance Framework and are now in the process of being registered. Input was obtained from the UK's 59 universities, the American Society of Criminology and the European Society of Criminology.

    Since 2005 the United States of America and the United Kingdom have been developing uniform benchmarks and standards for criminology qualifications. The United States of America standards were developed by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences as a voluntary certification process and finalised in October 2005.

    These countries are internationally regarded as leaders in the field of criminology. Although none of the developed benchmarks deal with Further Education and Training Certificates, the topics identified are similar to those in this qualification, i.e. theoretical approaches, conflict, deviance, describe and interpret crime and victimisation, understanding the criminal justice system, different research strategies, ethical aspects, appropriate programmes to deal with crime and victimisation, inform policy.

    For all intents and purposes, therefore, direct international comparability was not possible for the purposes of this qualification but the guidelines provided by the British Society of Criminology, the International Society of Criminology and the United States Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences were used as a benchmark during the review process.

    The International Society of Criminology:

    The International Society of Criminology recommends that criminologists should receive training in developing/evaluating crime theories/perspectives, crime reduction/prevention programmes and criminal justice policies, punishment and diversion programmes, juvenile delinquency and justice, victims of crime and restorative justice.

    This qualification does not go into depth on all of the above mentioned recommendations made by the American Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, but does address them especially in terms of crime theories, crime reduction/prevention programmes and criminal justice procedures, punishment and diversion programmes and victims of crime and restorative justice.

    The British Society of Criminology:

    The British Society of Criminology provides the following training guidelines:

    Describe key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology; identify evidence-based crime theories; identify political and social processes of victimisation and criminalisation; describe different police cultures, trends in policing in a diverse society, youth and criminal justice practices; identify different research strategies and methods; identify an appropriate strategy for specific research problems; recognise the ethical dimensions of research; describe and interpret crime and victimisation; describe quantitative and qualitative research methods and data collection; undertake basic analysis; identify ethically appropriate action; present conclusions in an appropriate scientific format; identify and select appropriate programmes to deal with crime and victimisation problems; recommend appropriate policy to deal with crime, victimisation, criminalisation, responses to crime and deviance. Work experience placements or internships in relevant organisations are furthermore recommended.

    This qualification has incorporated within the context of this qualification the following recommendations made by the British Society of Criminology:

    Describing crime and victimisation; describing key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology; identifying social processes of victimisation and criminalisation; applying basic research methodology and ethics in the field of crime and victimisation; identify and select appropriate programmes to deal with crime and victimisation problems; recommending appropriate policy to deal with crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance.

    Additional this qualification includes the following content which is not included in the recommendations made by the British Society of Criminology:

    Describing human, social and ecological rights; describing the structuring and functioning of the criminal justice system; identifying vulnerability; identifying risk factors and identifying trends and patterns.

    The American Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences:

    The American Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences recommends the following learning areas:

    Administration of justice: the contemporary criminal justice system, forms of social control, policies and practices; victimology; juvenile justice; comparative criminal justice.

    Corrections: History, theory, practice, development of correctional philosophy, incarceration, diversion, community-based corrections, treatment of offenders.

    Criminological theory: The nature and causes of crime, typologies, offenders and victims.

    Law adjudication: Criminal law, criminal procedures, prosecution, defense, and court procedures and decision-making.

    Law enforcement: History, theory, practice and legal environment, police organisation, discretion, and subcultures.

    Research and analytic methods: Quantitative and qualitative, statistical methods, methods for conducting and analysing criminal justice research in a manner appropriate for undergraduate students.

    This qualification incorporates all of the aspects as recommended by the American Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.

    The following qualification frameworks were further consulted:

    The United Kingdom Vocational/Qualifications Authority, the Scottish Qualifications Authority, the National Qualifications Authority of Ireland, the New Zealand Qualifications Authority, the Australian Qualifications Framework, the American Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority Framework, the European Qualifications Framework and the Netherlands/Vlaams Accreditation Organisation.

    No qualifications authority mentioned above had information on Further Education and Training qualification in Criminology. No information could also be found on Further Education and Training in Criminology on the African continent. Criminology is not included in the qualifications framework of African countries. Where criminology is offered as a course in the tertiary institutions of some African countries it forms part of the legal (Zambia, Zimbabwe, Rwanda) or sociology qualifications (Universities of Nairobi, Botswana, Tanzania Makerere, Uganda and Namibia).

    Summary:

    This qualification, in the context of an FETC level qualification, is therefore either in line or exceeds recommendations made by international criminology organisations. 

    ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification lends itself to both vertical and horizontal articulation possibilities.

    Horizontal articulation is possible with the following Qualifications:
  • ID 57713: Further Education and Training Certificate: Specialist Security Practices, NQF Level 4.
  • ID 59889: Further Education and Training Certificate: Military Operations, NQF Level 4.

    Vertical articulation is possible with the following qualifications:
  • ID 48553: National Diploma: Corrections Science, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 48865: National Certificate: Policing, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 17224: National Certificate: Security Management, NQF Level 5. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, and Assurance (ETQA) Body.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the ETQA's policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation; in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between ETQA's (including professional bodies); and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed immediately below.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual unit standards, the integrated competence described in the Qualification and will include competence within core sales and the elective standards relevant to the economic sector.

    Anyone wishing to be assessed against this Qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    For an applicant to register as an assessor, the applicant needs:
  • A minimum of 2 (two) years' practical, relevant occupational experience.
  • A relevant Qualification at NQF Level 5 or higher.
  • To be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    This qualification replaces qualification 48856, "Further education and training certificate: Criminology", Level 4, 143 credits.
  • Equal weight is given to crime and victimisation.
  • Learners must be exposed to practical work such as case studies, mock trials, the criminal justice system and others types of practical work.

    Range Statement:

    Conflict refers to individual, social, organisational and environmental conflict. 

  • UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  255758  Apply basic programmes to prevent/reduce crime and victimisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255762  Apply basic research methodology and ethics  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255757  Apply strategies to inform individuals and the community about crime and victimisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255755  Apply various techniques to measure crime and victimisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255764  Describe human, social and ecological rights in the field of crime and victimisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255761  Describe the structure and functioning of the criminal justice system in South Africa  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255760  Determine crime and victimisation vulnerability relating to lifestyle patterns  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255763  Determine the impact of crime and victimisation on individuals, society and ecological systems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255766  Identify individual, social and corporate risk factors contributing to crime and victimisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  255759  Identify crime and victimisation trends and patterns with reference to specific types of crime and victimisation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119458  Analyse and respond to a variety of literary texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119465  Write/present/sign texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  12155  Apply comprehension skills to engage written texts in a business environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119462  Engage in sustained oral/signed communication and evaluate spoken/signed texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119469  Read/view, analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9016  Represent analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119459  Write/present/sign for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120281  Apply basic communication skills in interactions with persons in trouble with the law  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  7786  Operate a Computer  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  254176  Promote and uphold the rights of children and youth  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  120276  Apply knowledge of social issues in relation to probation work  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120374  Contribute to the management of project risk within own field of expertise  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  254187  Demonstrate basic interpersonal skills with children and youth at risk, and their families  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  117504  Identify and support the abused child  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117158  Investigate ways of managing financial risk in own lives  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  119265  Manage risk in own work environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  254177  Observe, record and report in a child and youth care work context  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117496  Provide care and support to an elderly person  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  254179  Work as part of a team, under supervision, with children and youth at risk  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  120277  Work as part of a team, under supervision, with persons in trouble with the law  Level 4  NQF Level 04 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    When qualifications are replaced, some (but not all) of their learning programmes are moved to the replacement qualifications. If a learning programme appears to be missing from here, please check the replaced qualification.
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.