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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

National Certificate: Yacht and Boat Building 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
77003  National Certificate: Yacht and Boat Building 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Manufacturing and Assembly Processes 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
MERSETA - Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Certificate  Field 06 - Manufacturing, Engineering and Technology  Manufacturing and Assembly 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  136  Level 2  NQF Level 02  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 10105/14  2015-07-01  2018-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2019-06-30   2022-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification replaces: 
Qual ID Qualification Title Pre-2009 NQF Level NQF Level Min Credits Replacement Status
50542  National Certificate: Small Craft Construction  Level 2  NQF Level 02  156  Complete 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The purpose of this qualification is to prepare qualifying learners for a career in yacht and boatbuilding, to provide an opportunity for people currently employed in the industry to achieve formal recognition for their accumulated knowledge and skills and to enable them to advance in a structured career and learning path, and to facilitate the economic growth and development of the South African boatbuilding industry.

Qualifying learners will have developed basic boatbuilding skills, knowledge and understanding, which include:
  • An understanding of the boatbuilding environment, including a broad understanding of different boatbuilding techniques and their applicability to the different materials commonly used for boatbuilding.
  • A practical understanding of workshop safety.
  • Selecting and safely operating the appropriate basic hand and power tools commonly used in boatbuilding.
  • Operating basic power machinery used in woodworking applications in boatbuilding.
  • A basic understanding of laminating materials with specific reference to boatbuilding applications.
  • Basic laminating skills.

    Learners acquiring this qualification will have an improved understanding of their role, and acquire the applied competencies to consistently and effectively execute their duties by contributing to the manufacturing process, and adhering to quality and safety requirements.

    Rationale:

    The boat building industry is a complex and specialised sector supplying a vast range of quality boats to customers. The emergence of South Africa as a cost effective supplier to international markets has created a demand for people with the skills to build yachts and boats as well as to perform support functions in a boat building process. These processes include laminating, marine joinery, boat design and construction, metalwork, complying with international boat building standards, installing and maintaining marine electrical systems and inflatable boat technology.

    This is the first in a series of qualifications in yacht and boat building starting at NQF Level 2 and progressing to NQF Level 4. This series of qualifications will enable learners to:
  • Develop their existing skill level and progress vertically in a selected career path within the yacht and boat building industry.
  • Receive recognition for experience gained in the work place through an RPL process.
  • Obtain skills and knowledge that are portable within similar manufacturing industries.
  • Gain access to higher levels of learning and learning provision.
  • Access opportunities to progress in their personal life and career and add value to the operations in which they function.
  • Contribute to the growth of the South African economy and society.

    This learning pathway addresses the full skills requirements of the boatbuilding sector and will prepare qualifying learners for the broad range of activities that must be undertaken by the competent boatbuilder, whilst at the same time providing a sound base for further learning.

    People working in the yacht and boat building sector require validation of their skills and experience through access to formal qualifications and standards. The qualification affirms the experiences of boat builders through the recognition of prior learning, credit accumulation and achievement of competencies. It also provides learners with opportunities for professional development and career advancement within the broader manufacturing environment. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that learners are already competent in:
  • Communication and Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 1 or equivalent.

    Recognition of Prior Learning:

    The structure of this unit standards-based qualification makes the Recognition of Prior Learning possible. This qualification may therefore be achieved in part or completely through the recognition of prior learning, which includes formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience. The learner should be thoroughly briefed on the mechanism to be used and support and guidance should be provided. Care should be taken that the mechanism used provides the learner with an opportunity to demonstrate competence and is not so onerous as to prevent learners from taking up the Recognition of Prior Learning option towards gaining a qualification.

    If the learner is able to demonstrate competence in the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes implicit in this qualification the appropriate credits should be assigned to the learner. Recognition of Prior Learning will be done by means of Integrated Assessment as mentioned above.

    This Recognition of prior learning may allow:
  • Accelerated access to further learning at this or higher levels on the NQF.
  • Gaining of credits towards a unit standard.
  • Obtaining of this Qualification in part or in whole.

    Access to the Qualification:
  • This qualification is open for learners whose mobility on a standard boat would not be restricted due to any disabilities. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The Qualification is made up of Fundamental, Core, and Elective unit standards and a minimum of 136 Credits are required to complete the Qualification.

    In this Qualification the credits are allocated as follows:
  • Fundamental: 36 Credits.
  • Core: 90 Credits.
  • Electives: 10 Credits (minimum).

    Total: 136 Credits.

    The Fundamental Component:

    The Fundamental Component consists of Unit standards to the value of 20 Credits in Communication in a South African language at NQF Level 2 and Unit standards in Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 2 to the value of 16 Credits. All the Fundamental unit standards are compulsory.

    The Core Component:

    Yacht and Boat Building, can be differentiated from most other trades by the extremely wide range of core competencies that are required by the technically competent practitioner. A high level of skill and understanding are necessary in activities as diverse as joinery, metalwork, fibreglass fabrication, and electrical, mechanical and plumbing installation for the professional boatbuilder.

    This Core component covers competencies related to boat building practices, health, safety and environmental issues, tools and equipment, manufacturing processes and materials. The unit standards provide the knowledge, values and skills that all learners require in order to engage in boat building practices.

    All the Unit standards to the value of 90 credits in the Core Component are compulsory.

    Elective Component:

    Learners are to choose elective unit standards to the value of at least 10 Credits to complete the qualification. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the boatbuilding environment, including a broad understanding of different boatbuilding techniques and their applicability to the different materials commonly used for boatbuilding.

    2. Demonstrate a practical understanding of workshop safety.

    3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of composite materials with specific reference to boatbuilding applications.

    4. Use basic laminating techniques.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    1. Identify and solve problems in which response displays that responsible decisions, using critical and creative thinking, have been made by:
  • Identification of materials.
  • Identification of hull forms and features.
  • Identification of causes of problems.
  • Identification of different problems resulting from inappropriate material or tool selection and potential solutions.

    2. Work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community by:
  • Liaising with team members and supervisor.

    3. Organise and manage oneself and ones' activities responsibly and effectively by:
  • Plan sequence of operations based on job specification.

    4. Collect, analyse, organise and evaluate information by:
  • Examine finished product for non-conformances.

    5. Communicate well orally or in writing:
  • Record information on work performed.
  • Report outcome of work to supervisors.

    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the world as a set of related systems:
  • Explain the consequences of inappropriate hull type selection.
  • Explain the consequences of inappropriate material or production process selection.

    7. Use science and technology effectively and critically by:
  • Understanding of material properties.
  • Understanding of construction processes.
  • Understand measuring and drawing techniques.
  • Understand fairing techniques.
  • Understand measuring and mixing equipment and techniques. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
  • Different types of small craft and their specific distinguishing characteristics are identified and described.
  • The main parts of a boat are identified and their basic functionality described.
  • Different boatbuilding techniques are described and their applicability to the major boatbuilding materials explained.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
  • The work area is kept in a safe and productive state through the application of health and safety standards.
  • Personal protective equipment is used according to health and safety standards.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
  • Different types of reinforcement material are described and identified, and their main properties and uses explained.
  • Different types of matrix material are described and identified and their main properties and uses discussed.
  • Different types of core material are described and identified and their main properties and uses discussed.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
  • Resins are measured and mixed according to specifications.
  • Reinforcements are selected, prepared and positioned according to specifications.
  • Basic hand-laminating techniques are applied.

    Integrated Assessment:
  • Assessment practices must be open, transparent, fair, valid, and reliable and ensure that no learner is disadvantaged in any way whatsoever, so that an integrated approach to assessment is incorporated into the qualification.
  • Learning, teaching and assessment are inextricably interwoven. Whenever possible, the assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values shown in the unit standards should be integrated.
  • Assessment of Communication and Mathematical Literacy should be integrated as far as possible with other aspects and should use practical administration contexts wherever possible. A variety of methods must be used in assessment and tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working or will work. Where it is not possible to assess the learner in the workplace or on-the-job, simulations, case studies, role-plays and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.
  • The term `Integrated Assessment` implies that theoretical and practical components should be assessed together. During integrated assessments, the assessor should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment tool methods and assess combinations of practical, applied, foundational and reflective competencies.
  • Assessors must assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience.
  • Assessment should ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes are evaluated in an integrated manner. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The South African boatbuilding qualifications have been developed to fit into the NQF system where a series of qualifications is developed at successive NQF Levels, each of which can be awarded to learners on completion, while full competence as a boatbuilder is only attained on completion of all the qualifications in the series. International practice, on the other hand, is that there is one large qualification encompassing the full range of competencies, skills and knowledge, which has to be completed for the person to be equipped as a competent boatbuilder. Learners internationally only receive the comprehensive qualification and not smaller, step-by step qualifications. This makes it difficult to compare the qualifications on a level by level basis with other qualifications from around the world.

    While the qualified South African boat builder may ultimately have very similar skills, and a comparable level of knowledge to boatbuilders in different countries, the process of developing these is quite distinct in South Africa.

    This qualification was compared with training offered in countries that are acknowledged leaders in the small boat-building industry i.e. countries whose industry supplies small craft to other countries. These countries are:
  • USA.
  • Malaysia.
  • Turkey.
  • Australia.
  • New Zealand.
  • UK.

    The United Kingdom:

    The United Kingdom is renowned for their boat building expertise and there are several national registered qualifications, however, it seems that many training providers still present their own traditional learning programs based on the learner's years of experience and specific manufacturer's needs. The UK is the only country that offers qualifications on consecutive 'levels' in a similar way to South Africa, but only does so at two levels, namely level 2 and level 3. In the UK there are very well established boatbuilding schools which offer the full range of training in a specialist practical environment. May of the programmes include theoretical examinations which students do online, while they have to demonstrate competence through a series of assignments managed and assessed at their boat building yard. The South African boat building qualifications are much more comprehensive.

    New Zealand:

    New Zealand offers qualifications at level 3 and level 4, but the qualifications are distinct and do not follow on from one another. By far the majority of the qualifications are at level 4, and the prospective boatbuilder would spend between three and five years accumulating the necessary credits, skills and experience to attain the level 4 qualification without first acquiring a level 2 or level 3 qualification along the way. In New Zealand there is a very well developed tradition of practical training being done in boatyards, and learners develop all their skill and experience in the workplace and attend polytechnics or universities for the theoretical content only.

    In general the contents of the South African boat building qualifications, taking the level 2, 3 and 4 qualifications as a whole, compare well with the New Zealand boat building qualifications.

    United States of America:

    The American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) have a well developed professional certification process which covers the majority of the core boatbuilding skills. This series of South African boatbuilding qualifications (levels 2, 3 and 4) focuses on the same core knowledge and skills, and the successful learner should be well prepared for ABYC certification on completion of all three qualifications.

    Turkey:

    The boating industry in Turkey is well developed. A technical high school, Kurucasile, on the Black Sea Coast of Turkey, is devoted to boat building only. This school, in addition to modern techniques, teaches its students, elements and principles of traditional craftsmanship. A number of other schools and academic institutions also run diploma courses in boatbuilding, which include practical components being learned at large yards. All these diplomas are valid nationwide. These programmes and courses consist of all the skills and knowledge required by a boatbuilder and are not shorter certificate courses given to successful learners who have mastered only some of the skills and knowledge required. Diplomas issued by large universities (such as the naval architect diplomas issued by most technical universities) are internationally recognised.

    Australia:

    Australia has a well-established boat-building industry supported by well-defined units of study to be offered by training providers. Their learning programs in boat building do not seem to follow levels of complexity. It is very difficult to compare the South African individual boat building qualifications with those in Australia. However, it seems that once South African learners have completed the Further Education and Training Certificate: Boatbuilding and the preceding two qualifications at Level 2 and 3, they will be adequately equipped to compete with their Australian counterparts.

    Malaysia:

    Malaysia is an emerging boat building country. To date they have not developed a formal national qualification. They have however identified future training objectives and are in the process of developing learning programmes for the manufacture of fibreglass boats.

    Africa in General:

    Although many countries in Africa have displayed the capability to build boats of many shapes and sizes it still lacks the capability to build modern boats. No evidence was found of any boat building training being presented in sub-Saharan Africa. The South African qualifications could help to fill that gap on the continent by making these qualifications available to all those countries that might show an interest in these qualifications.

    Conclusion:

    Other countries all have a certain assumed level of basic education and do not attempt to combine teaching of Mathematics and Communication Fundamentals with the qualifications in the same way as the NQF in South Africa. While this is in response to a particular South African need, it further contributes to the local qualification being quite different in nature from any of its international counterparts.

    The cumulative content of the South African qualifications (Levels 2, 3 and 4) is broader than would be required in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK, but very similar to the recently developed ABYC qualifications in the USA. In the other countries, while the full scope of skills and knowledge are available as qualifications, students tend to specialise in more specific areas and so achieve a boat building qualification with a particular area of focus.

    The South African qualifications offer learners a number of sequential shorter qualifications, while the other countries offer qualifications at the end of a longer, but possibly more narrowly focused period of learning.

    Level 2:

    In Level 2, learners receive an introduction to the working environment, workplace health and safety training, and entry level skills and boat building knowledge very similar to what they would receive in all the other countries, with the primary difference being that they receive a Level 2 qualification at the end of it. The South African qualification includes Fundamentals in Mathematical Literacy and Communication which the others do not.

    Level 3:

    In Level 3, students build on the knowledge and skills acquired at Level 2 in a very similar fashion to the other countries studied, with the main difference again being the awarding of a level 3 qualification upon completion, and the inclusion of further Mathematical Literacy and Communication Fundamentals.

    In terms of levels, the level 3 falls between the UK Level 2 and Level 3, and is similar to the New Zealand Level 3, although in New Zealand no interim qualification is awarded.

    Level 4:

    At Level 4 the learner hones his/her skills, and refines his/her knowledge of boatbuilding, and upon completion, the successful learner will have achieved an almost identical level of theoretical knowledge to his counterpart following the ABYC syllabus in the USA, but will achieve the qualification with slightly less experience. Likewise, the New Zealand, Australian and Canadian students will have more workplace experience and a slightly narrower theoretical basis, while the UK student will have less experience and a slightly narrower knowledge base, but much more intensive practical training.

    As stated in the beginning, it is very difficult to compare unlike levels and systems across countries, and each system will naturally have its own benefits and drawbacks. The content of the South African qualification is as comprehensive as any other and broader than most, but the way of delivering the training and the assessment thereof are quite different. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification articulates with the following Qualifications:

    Horizontal articulation:
  • ID 49091: National Certificate: Furniture Making: Wood, NQF Level 2.

    Vertical articulation:
  • ID 49105: National Certificate: Furniture Making: Wood, NQF Level 3.
  • ID 78863: National Certificate: Yacht and Boat Building, NQF Level 3. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this Qualification must be registered as an assessor with an appropriate Education and Training Quality Assurance Body (ETQA) or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this Qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA or by an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA, according to the ETQA`s policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments at exit points of the Qualification, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described both in individual Unit Standards as well as in the exit level outcomes described in the Qualification. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    For an applicant to register as an assessor, the applicant needs:
  • To be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance Body.
  • A relevant qualification at one level higher than the level of the qualification and 12 months experience in the relevant field.
  • Well-developed subject matter expertise within boat building. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    This qualification replaces qualification 50542, "National Certificate: Small Craft Construction", Level 2, 156 credits. 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  365146  Apply a range of boat design and construction principles  Level 2  NQF Level 02  20 
    Core  365159  Demonstrate a practical understanding of marine joinery  Level 2  NQF Level 02  30 
    Core  365145  Demonstrate an understanding of corrosion and basic metalwork in a marine environment  Level 2  NQF Level 02  10 
    Core  365143  Demonstrate an understanding of inflatable boat technology  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Core  110281  Fabricate a polymer composite product  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Core  110289  Identify and work with material as required for polymer composite fabrication  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Core  13220  Keep the work area safe and productive  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  119463  Access and use information from texts  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  12461  Communicate at work  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  7480  Demonstrate understanding of rational and irrational numbers and number systems  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  9008  Identify, describe, compare, classify, explore shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional shapes in different contexts  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  119454  Maintain and adapt oral/signed communication  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  12444  Measure, estimate and calculate physical quantities and explore, describe and represent geometrical relationships in 2-dimensions in different life or workplace contexts  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  119460  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  7469  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal and community life  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Fundamental  9007  Work with a range of patterns and functions and solve problems  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  123600  Demonstrate seamanship for the safe crewing of a small craft  Level 2  NQF Level 02  10 
    Elective  12465  Develop a learning plan and a portfolio for assessment  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  12484  Perform basic fire fighting  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  12483  Perform basic first aid  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  119753  Perform basic welding/joining of metals  Level 2  NQF Level 02 
    Elective  12481  Sling loads  Level 2  NQF Level 02 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    When qualifications are replaced, some (but not all) of their learning programmes are moved to the replacement qualifications. If a learning programme appears to be missing from here, please check the replaced qualification.
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.