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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: Inclusive Education 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
49531  Further Education and Training Certificate: Inclusive Education 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Inclusive Education 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
ETDP SETA - Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 05 - Education, Training and Development  Adult Learning 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  144  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 10105/14  2015-07-01  2018-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2019-06-30   2022-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification is replaced by: 
Qual ID Qualification Title Pre-2009 NQF Level NQF Level Min Credits Replacement Status
101549  Occupational Certificate: Teacher's Aide Inclusive Education  Not Applicable  NQF Level 05  217  Will occur as soon as 101549 is registered 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The purpose of the Qualification is to ensure that practitioners are able to function effectively in inclusive settings. Qualified learners are expected to manage residential, employment and/or learning sites in inclusive settings, be able to work in multi-disciplinary teams to support other professionals, and support individuals or groups learning and working in inclusive settings.

Qualified learners are capable of:
  • Gathering information regarding inclusive practice within learning environments.
  • Providing relevant support to individuals and groups to promote social, emotional, employment, recreational, academic and recreational inclusion.
  • Delivering professional services in accordance with legal requirements to optimise service delivery.
  • Creating healthy, safe and secure inclusive settings that ensure the protection of individuals and groups.
  • Advocating human rights and inclusion within specific communities in support of inclusion.
  • Supporting curriculum access in inclusive settings.
  • Facilitating learning events in inclusive settings to promote learning and general well-being.

    Rationale:

    Legislation and policy regarding inclusive education requires that practitioners be able to deliver appropriate services in inclusive settings. Inclusive education acknowledges that all people can learn and respects their differences; it enables structures, systems and methodologies for learning to meet the needs of all; it is part of a wider strategy to promote an inclusive society; and it is a dynamic process which is constantly evolving. The intention with the registration of this Qualification is to build the capacity of practitioners in inclusive settings, as no Qualification exists at this level for entry into the field of inclusive learning. Furthermore, the existence of a national Qualification is aimed at improving the consistency of programmes and assessments.

    The Qualification is aimed at persons responsible for residential settings (these practitioners are historically referred to as housemothers or parents) for children and adults experiencing intrinsic or extrinsic barriers to learning and employment, as well as support/auxiliary workers such as caregivers and classroom assistants, who are responsible for facilitating learning and providing support in inclusive settings. In addition, specific Unit Standards included in the Qualification are aimed at other professionals who work in inclusive settings, such as equity officers, orientation and mobility practitioners, helping professionals (including health care workers, psychologists, doctors, occupational therapists, etc.), Early Childhood Development practitioners, Adult Basic Education and Training practitioners, Development practitioners, trainers, educators in General, Further and Higher Education and Training institutions, sign language interpreters, librarians, child minders, au pairs, reformatory workers, prison care centre personnel, personnel in places of safety, etc.

    Qualified practitioners are able to provide the appropriate level of support, adaptation and modification of delivery for learners. They are able to facilitate development in an inclusive setting according to the needs of learners who are experiencing barriers to learning, to ensure equal access to outcomes based learning opportunities. Qualified practitioners should be flexible and responsive in their delivery.

    This Qualification provides recognition for practitioners' working experience, and allows for the achievement of a Qualification. The Qualification provides them with opportunities to progress and access education, training and development practice Qualifications at NQF Level 5. The Qualification was designed to facilitate promotion life-long learning, and access to Higher Education and Training, and articulates with Qualifications in other disciplines, such as ancillary health care. In addition, various professionals, such as health care workers, psychologists, doctors, and occupational therapists, require areas of competence included in the Unit Standards of this Qualification to ensure inclusion.

    Empowerment of practitioners will lead to the empowerment of learners. Competent implementation of inclusive education will create jobs for practitioners and improve employment and social participation opportunities for those learners who are experiencing barriers to learning and employment. By creating a body of knowledge regarding inclusion, a national asset is harnessed. The Qualification may improve financial status of practitioners, add national economic value through qualified professionals and improve learners' economic participation and opportunities. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    Learners are assumed to be competent in Communication and Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 3.

    Recognition of prior learning:

    This qualification can be achieved wholly, or in part, through recognition of prior learning. Evidence can be presented in a variety of forms, including previous international or local qualifications, reports, testimonials, mentoring, functions performed, portfolios, work records and performance records. As such, evidence should be judged according to the general principles of assessment described in the notes to assessors below. Learners who have met the requirements of any Unit Standard that forms part of this qualification may apply for recognition of prior learning to the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance body (ETQA). The applicant must be assessed against the Specific Outcomes and with the Assessment Criteria for the relevant Unit Standards. A Qualification will be awarded should a learner demonstrate that the Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification have been attained. 

    RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    The Qualification consists of a Fundamental, a Core and an Elective Component.

    To be awarded the Qualification, learners are required to obtain a minimum of 144 credits as detailed below.

    Fundamental Component:

    The Fundamental Component consists of Unit Standards in:
  • Mathematical Literacy at Level 4 to the value of 16 credits.
  • Communication at Level 4 in a First South African Language to the value of 20 credits.
  • Communication in a Second South African Language at Level 3 to the value of 20 credits.

    It is compulsory therefore for learners to do Communication in two different South African languages, one at Level 4 and the other at Level 3.

    All Unit Standards in the Fundamental Component are compulsory.

    Core Component:
  • The Core Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 68 credits all of which are compulsory.

    Elective Component:
  • The Elective Component consists of Unit Standards to the value of 185 credits. Learners are to choose Unit Standards to the minimum of 20 credits.

    Learners who choose to specialise in Sign language must complete from the following list of Unit Standards totalling a minimum of 20 credits:
  • 115076; Deliver a monologue for a known audience on a familiar topic using South African Sign Language; Level 4; 10 credits.
  • 115078; Demonstrate the production and reception of regional South African Fingerspelling; Level 4; 4 credits.
  • 115074; Engage in short conversations with a Deaf person on a familiar topic using SASL; Level 4; 6 credits.
  • 115077; Give and ask for directions to places and locations, using South African Sign Language; Level 4; 4 credits.
  • 115075; Inform and explain about simple arrangements and processes using South African Sign Language; Level 4; 10 credits.
  • 115079; Perform everyday communicative tasks using South African Sign Language; Level 4; 4 credits.
  • 115073; Demonstrate knowledge of Deaf culture, the Deaf community and technology, services and education for the Deaf in South Africa. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    Fundamental and Core:

    1. Gather information regarding inclusive practice within learning environments

    2. Provide relevant support to individuals and groups to promote social, emotional, employment, recreational, academic and recreational inclusion.

    3. Deliver professional services in accordance with legal requirements to optimise service delivery.
    > Range: Professional services within an inclusive context may include health services, education services, management services, correctional services, supervision services, etc.

    4. Create healthy, safe and secure inclusive settings that ensure the protection of individuals and groups.

    5. Advocate human rights and inclusion within specific communities in support of inclusion.

    6. Support curriculum access in inclusive settings.

    7. Facilitate learning events in inclusive settings to promote learning and general well-being.
    > Range: Learning events can be aimed at any one age group, and for any one purpose.

    Elective (achievement of one outcome is required to qualify):

    7a. Supervise residential, employment and/or learning sites to ensure optimal functioning and promote inclusivity.

    7b. Manage administration that promotes inclusion.
    > Range: Administration may include organisation of and running meetings, site maintenance, household management, keeping attendance registers, purchasing and stock control, basic assistive devices maintenance, completion of relevant forms, report writing, correspondence, duty sheet compilation and completion, etc. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Fundamental and Core:

    1:
  • Criteria developed for selecting relevant information are listed in terms of specific context requirements.
  • Relevant sources are identified, collated and recorded using agreed conventions.
  • All information and quotations taken from sources are acknowledged and checks are made to ensure that no copyright laws have been infringed.

    2:
  • Support strategy efficacy is assessed against specified requirements.
    > Range: Support can include amenities that are fit for purpose; specific requirements includes consultation with relevant stakeholders, and identification and interpretation of the level of individual and group needs for participation in activities based on observed and documented information about specific individual and group needs.
  • Progress reports are planned and written in accordance with specified requirements.
  • Assessment and reporting of individual progress as well as events and incidents of significance are recorded in writing.
  • Activities are planned and presented to meet the requirements for inclusion and are appropriate for specific contexts and environments.
    > Range: Activities may include workplace, sport, learning, recreational, leisure, etc. activities; requirements for inclusion can be based on constitutional principles, such as human rights, access and participation, and can include accommodating diverse needs, appropriate activities.

    3:
  • Events and incidents of significance are communicated using specified formats.
  • Collaboration and consultation are applied according to agreed principles.
  • Responsibilities as a team member are explained and implemented according to agreed principles of collaboration and consultation.
  • Self evaluation, reflection and seeking assistance are justified in terms of own strengths, weaknesses and capabilities.

    4:
  • The administration of health, safety and security procedures are applied according to specified and regulatory requirements.
  • Procedures are explained as they apply to given limitations of scope and assistance.
  • Crisis identification and management are applied within given scope of responsibilities.
  • Suspected criminal activities are reported to relevant persons.
    > Range: Criminal activities may include abuse, corruption, etc.

    5:
  • Content and context of advocacy is justified in terms of specified support needs.
  • Legislation, policies, and regulations are explained in terms of relevance to inclusive education and advocacy.
  • Advocacy strategies, plans, implementation and evaluation are justified in terms of specific needs and focus is on individual strengths, requirements for mutual respect and acceptance within specific contexts.

    6:
  • Responses to diverse learning needs are justified for specific learning needs.
    > Range: Responses can include mediation and/or implementation of selected learning support materials.
  • Educational/training concepts and principles are described in terms of their relevance to specific contexts.
    > Range: Principles may include principle of Outcomes Based Education, assessment, levels of support, adaptations, modifications, assistive technology, etc.
  • The implementation of differentiated approaches is explained in terms of specific contexts.

    7:
  • Planning, content, materials and facilitation are explained in terms of their effectiveness and appropriateness in terms of specific criteria.
    > Range: Criteria include specific target group characteristics and needs.
  • Reporting of learning events is explained in terms of specified requirements.
  • Preparation and presentation of assessment evidence is explained in terms of given requirements.

    Elective (achievement of one outcome is required to qualify):

    7a:
  • Procedures for the management of learning/residential environments are explained in terms of specified requirements.
    > Range: Requirements include hygiene, legal/regulatory, policy, health (including nutritional) and physical infrastructure maintenance requirements.
  • Activities are planned and presented as they apply to specific contexts.
  • Legislation, policies and regulations are interpreted as they relate to inclusive education.
  • Strategies for the generation of resources are explained to determine if they are feasible for specific contexts.

    7b:
  • All required administrative procedures, tasks and activities are performed to promote inclusion, as required within specific contexts, and within specified deadlines and time frames.
    > Range: Administration includes procurement, financial transacting and recording; required procedures can be developed by the learner.
  • Administrative procedures are explained as they pertain to inclusive education.
  • Financial transacting and recording are executed according to administrative requirements.

    Integrated assessment:

    The Assessment criteria in the unit standards are performance-based, assessing applied competence of practitioners, rather than only underpinning knowledge, or only skills. The Critical Cross-field Outcomes are also achieved in the Unit Standards. In addition to the competence assessed to achieve the unit standards, learners must demonstrate that they can achieve the outcomes in an integrated manner, dealing effectively with different and random demands related to practitioner occupational and learning contexts, to qualify, and assessment approaches used should be appropriate for assessing applied competence of practitioners. Integrated assessment is meaningful if there are clear relationships between the purpose statement, exit level outcomes and integrated assessment of this qualification.

    Learners who qualify must be able to integrate concepts, ideas and behaviours across unit standards to achieve the purpose of the qualification. Evidence (as specified in the associated assessment criteria) is required that the learner is able to achieve the exit level outcomes of the qualification as a whole and in an integrated way, and thus its purpose, at the time of the award of the qualification.

    Evidence of integration may be presented by learners when being assessed against the unit standards, and separate assessment for integration may not be necessary. Workplace experience can be recognised when assessing towards this qualification. Integrated assessment should include observable performance as well as the quality of thinking behind such performance. Formative assessment can be employed during learning towards the unit standards and during integration to achieve exit level outcomes, to ensure that integration takes place when summative assessment is employed. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Internationally, most education and training for the facilitation of learning in inclusive settings is limited to qualified teacher/educator education and training. In Africa, inclusive education policies in South Africa and Uganda are considered exemplary, even by international standards.

    In African countries such as Rwanda, Kenya, Swaziland, Zambia, Ethiopia and Lesotho, training for inclusion is mostly limited to teacher training, at higher levels than this South African qualification. Such teacher training, usually in the form of short courses, includes peer support, classroom management, adapting the curriculum, group work, encouraging family support, and promoting positive attitudes. Most other initiatives make use of community development and participation, without formal raining at the community level. Other countries with similar approaches include Yemen, Macedonia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Iran, Vietnam, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Brazil, Cambodia, Cameroon, Mongolia, Nepal, Afghanistan, and Romania. Uganda has similar inclusive education policies to that of South Africa, but also limits training to higher levels, and mostly for qualified teachers.

    In India, the approach to inclusion has been integration within schools. General teachers learn to:
  • Establish a baseline of existing levels of competence.
  • Plan long and short-term educational interventions.
  • Manage the classroom.
  • Understand child focused learning.
  • Facilitate learning.
  • Manage classrooms.
  • Develop curriculum-based, criterion-referenced materials for assessment, identification, planning, implementation and evaluation.
  • Develop learning materials, including facilitator guides.
  • Prepare monitoring tools, that also allow parent participation.
  • Enhance communication skills.
  • Enhance self image.

    They also learn life skills. These competencies are at a level above that of this South African qualification.

    In Israel, on-the-job training is provided to residential educators and care workers and, not unlike the South African qualification, is aimed at providing access to education careers at higher levels of training. As with the South African qualification, training addresses residential care as well as education competence. Although the Israeli programs run over five years, the learning time is equivalent to that of this South African qualification. Areas addressed in the programs include youth at risk, information education and care, educational sociology, developmental psychology, quantitative research methods, group dynamics and communication and interviewing.

    In the United States of America, equivalent competence is required of individualised personal services or home management services. Training is mostly on-the-job, and addresses mostly personal care competence to facilitate independent living, implement procedures regarding protective equipment and decontamination, doing laundry, ensuring waste removal, ensuring personal hygiene, cleaning and care of equipment, assistance with adaptive technology, skin care and bathing, dressing and grooming, facilitating motion exercises, transfers, house care and domestic management, meal preparation and food safety, and meeting the needs and preferences of the person with a disability. Community worker training is differentiated and includes collaboration, funding, building responsibility and leadership, family and peer support, supportive services and opportunities, career awareness, planning and readiness, and work and learning. Most other training regarding inclusion is provided to qualified teachers.

    In the United Kingdom, equivalent programs include the following core areas of competence:
  • Contribute to the management of learner behaviour.
  • Establish and maintain relationships with individual learners and groups.
  • Support learners during learning activities.
  • Review and develop own professional practice.

    The elective component includes six competence areas, with one from each of the following sets, and any other two areas:
  • Set A: Assist in preparing and maintaining the learning environment; Contribute to maintaining learner records; Observe and report on learner performance; Contribute to the planning and evaluation of learning activities.
  • Set B: Promote learner's social and emotional development; Support the maintenance of learner safety and security; Contribute to the health and well-being of learners; Provide support for bilingual/multilingual learners; Support learners with communication and interaction difficulties; Support learners with cognition and learning difficulties; Support learners with behavioural, emotional and social development needs; Provide support for learners with sensory and/or physical impairment.
  • Set C: Support the use of ICT in the classroom; Help learners to develop their literacy skills; Help learners to develop their numeracy skills; Help learners to access the curriculum.
  • Set D: Support the development and effectiveness of work teams; Develop and maintain working relationships with other professionals; Liase effectively with parents.

    Assisting learners in terms of specific learning areas (e.g. literacy, numeracy, etc.) are not included in the South African qualification. In Scotland, programs for residential caregivers focus on safety, principles and concepts, managing challenging behaviour, sexual abuse work, through care and after care, and parental involvement. These programs are shorter than the South African qualification, consisting of approximately 30 credits.

    On the Australia framework, equivalent competence forms part of a Certificate in Education for teacher aides. The core component includes:
  • Develop and apply knowledge and understanding of school sector issues.
  • Contribute to equitable and inclusive education.
  • Use the advanced functions of a range of equipment to complete daily tasks.
  • Assist with student supervision and behaviour management.
  • Support students with additional needs in the classroom.
  • Produce business documents.

    The elective component includes:
  • Support students learning in a particular learning area.
  • Support reading development.
  • Support writing development.
  • Support oral language development.
  • Support students' literature usage.
  • Support numeracy development.
  • Support the physical development of students.
  • Develop and apply knowledge of Tasmanian Aboriginal societies.
  • Provide care and support for students with disabilities; support students with a special need.
  • Work with young children.
  • Provide care and support for students with sever physical disabilities.
  • Support students with a communication disability.
  • Perform basic first aid in an education environment.

    Components not reflected in this South African qualification are those relating to supporting reading, writing, oral language development, literature usage, and numeracy development.

    The New Zealand framework credits competence at an equivalent level, however, with fewer credits and not as a qualification, for the following units:
  • Developing a plan of personal support networks.
  • Knowledge of conductive education and conductive education in New Zealand.
  • Assisting conductors during the conductive education programme.
  • Assisting conductors to prepare conductive education programmes.
  • Knowledge of the way conductive education works to establish orthofunction.
  • Assisting clients with self care in conductive education.
  • Participating in the implementation of individual learning plans for young people with special needs.
  • Assist with implementation of early intervention programmes.
  • Assist with implementation of various specific programmes (e.g. develop reading skills, deaf or hearing impaired persons, oral language difficulties, vision impaired persons, etc.).
  • Provide language assistance in education settings to young people who are deaf, and taking notes for young people who are deaf.
  • Identify and apply ethical guidelines for working with young people who have special education needs.
  • Describe and support a collaborative consultative team approach for young people with special needs. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
  • Vertical articulation on the NQF is possible with the National Certificate: Inclusive Education (NQF Level 5), as well as the National Diploma: Braille Practice (NQF Level 5), the National Diploma: Orientation and Mobility Practice (NQF Level 5), and the National Professional Diploma in Education (NQF Level 5).
  • Horizontal articulation on the NQF is possible with all Further Education and Training Certificates through the Fundamental component (Communication and Language and Mathematic Literacy), as well as the National Certificate: Project Management (NQF Level 4), Certificate: Small Business Financial Management (NQF Level 4), National Certificate: Generic Management (NQF Level 4), Further Education and Training Certificate: Community Health Work (NQF Level 4) and the Certificate: Occupation-Directed Education, Training and Development (ETD) Practice (NQF Level 4). 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Moderation of assessment and accreditation of providers shall be at the discretion of a relevant ETQA as long as it complies with the SAQA requirements. The ETQA is responsible for moderation of learner achievements of learners who meet the requirements of this qualification. Particular moderation and accreditation requirements are:
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA. Providers offering learning towards achievement of any of the unit standards that make up this qualification must also be accredited through the relevant ETQA.
  • The ETQA will oversee assessment and moderation of assessment according to their policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation, or in terms of agreements reached around assessment and moderation between the relevant ETQA and other ETQA's and in terms of the moderation guideline detailed here.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments for the qualification, unless the relevant ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described in Unit Standards as well as the integrated competence described in the qualification.
  • Internal moderation of assessment must take place at the point of assessment with external moderation provided by a relevant ETQA according to the moderation guidelines and the agreed ETQA procedures.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessment of learner achievements takes place at providers accredited by the relevant ETQA (RSA, 1998b) for the provision of programs that result in the outcomes specified for this qualification. Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against this qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA. Assessors registered with the relevant ETQA must carry out the assessment of learners for the qualification and any of the Unit Standards that make up this qualification.

    To register as an assessor, the following are required:
  • Detailed documentary proof of relevant qualification/s, practical training completed, and experience gained at a NQF level above the level of this qualification.
  • NQF recognised assessor credit.

    Assessors should keep the following general principles in mind when designing and conducting assessments:
  • Focus the initial assessment activities on gathering evidence in terms of the main outcomes expressed in the titles of the Unit Standards to ensure assessment is integrated rather than fragmented. Remember that the learner needs to be declared competent in terms of the qualification purpose and exit level outcomes.
  • Where assessment across Unit Standard titles or at Unit Standard title level is unmanageable, then focus assessment around each specific outcome, or groups of specific outcomes. Take special note of the need for integrated assessment.
  • Make sure evidence is gathered across the entire range, wherever it applies.

    In particular, assessors should assess that the learner demonstrates an ability to consider a range of options by:
  • Measuring the quality of the observed practical performance as well as the theory and underpinning knowledge.
  • Using methods that are varied to allow the learner to display thinking and decision making in the demonstration of practical performance.
  • Maintaining a balance between practical performance and theoretical assessment methods to ensure each is measured in accordance with the level of the qualification.
  • Taking into account that the relationship between practical and theoretical components is not fixed, but varies according to the type and level of qualification.

    All assessments should be conducted in line with the following well-documented principles:
  • Appropriate: The method of assessment is suited to the performance being assessed.
  • Fair: The method of assessment does not present any barriers to achievements, which are not related to the evidence.
  • Manage: The methods used make for easily arranged cost-effective assessments that do not unduly interfere with learning.
  • Integrate into work or learning: Evidence collection is integrated into the work or learning process where this is appropriate and feasible.
  • Valid: The assessment focuses on the requirements laid down in the standards; i.e. the assessment is fit for purpose.
  • Direct: The activities in the assessment mirror the conditions of actual performance as close as possible.
  • Authentic: The assessor is satisfied that the work being assessed is attributable to the learner being assessed.
  • Sufficient: The evidence collected establishes that all criteria have been met and that performance to the required Standard can be repeated consistently.
  • Systematic: Planning and recording is sufficiently rigorous to ensure that assessment is fair.
  • Open: Learners can contribute to the planning and accumulation of evidence. Learners for assessment understand the assessment process and the criteria that apply.
  • Consistent: The same assessor would make the same judgement again in similar circumstances. The judgement made is similar than the judgement that would be made by other assessors. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  117865  Assist and support learners to manage their learning experiences  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  119273  Assist in creating an inclusive environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  110057  Conduct a self-evaluation of own progress and development  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  117870  Conduct targeted training and development using given methodologies  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Core  12544  Facilitate the preparation and presentation of evidence for assessment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  119272  Identify levels of support needed for inclusion  Level 4  NQF Level 04  13 
    Core  10231  Plan a learning event  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  119274  Select learning support materials and assistive technology for inclusive settings  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Core  119271  Support curriculum access for inclusive learning  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Fundamental  8968  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  8969  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  8973  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  8970  Write texts for a range of communicative contexts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  8974  Engage in sustained oral communication and evaluate spoken texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  8975  Read analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9016  Represent analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  12153  Use the writing process to compose texts required in the business environment  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  8976  Write for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115433  Demonstrate basic computer literacy in school management  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  244568  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of effective study methods and techniques  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  7637  Maintain hygiene in food preparation, cooking and storage  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  10956  Provide commuter services  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  14048  Apply Self Management Concepts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115076  Deliver a monologue for a known audience on a familiar topic using South African Sign Language  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  263918  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of issues of diversity in a specific South African context  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115073  Demonstrate knowledge of Deaf culture, the Deaf community and technology, services and education for the Deaf in South Africa  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115078  Demonstrate the production and reception of regional South African Fingerspelling  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  14667  Describe and apply the management functions of an organization  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  117189  Describe the use of relationships for developmental and therapeutic ends in child and youth care work  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  110003  Develop administrative procedures in a selected organisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117505  Educate and support parents in childcare  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  115074  Engage in short conversations with a Deaf person on a familiar topic using SASL  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  264260  Facilitate a peer education intervention  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  7384  Facilitate an adult learning event  Level 4  NQF Level 04  16 
    Elective  10142  Fulfill procurement activities and supervise procurement administration  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115077  Give and ask for directions to places and locations, using South African Sign Language  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114483  Identify and apply strategies to deal with risk behaviour to promote psychological health and wellness  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115075  Inform and explain about simple arrangements and processes using South African Sign Language  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  110009  Manage administration records  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  109999  Manage service providers in a selected organisation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114589  Manage time productively  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114740  Manage working capital  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13947  Motivate a team  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117173  Observe, record and report as an auxiliary child and youth care worker in child and youth care work context  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115209  Participate in the development of a strategic plan for fundraising  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  10134  Participate in the estimation and preparation of cost budgets for an element of work and monitor and control actual cost against budget  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115079  Perform everyday communicative tasks using South African Sign Language  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114738  Perform financial planning and control functions for a small business  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117488  Plan and implement home based care  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117491  Produce accounting reports  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  117492  Record and process workplace transactions  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Elective  114736  Record business financial transactions  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  7884  Control and order stock  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15096  Demonstrate an understanding of stress in order to apply strategies to achieve optimal stress levels in personal and work situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15094  Demonstrate insight into the application of theories of Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence in personal development  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  10214  Promote an awareness of nutritional principles  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    When qualifications are replaced, some of their learning programmes are moved to being recorded against the replacement qualifications. If a learning programme appears to be missing from here, please check the replacement.
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. HEIRS DEVELOPERS AND CONSULTANTS 



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