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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION THAT HAS PASSED THE END DATE: 

Further Education and Training Certificate: General Forestry 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
66349  Further Education and Training Certificate: General Forestry 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Forestry 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
FPMSETA - Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Further Ed and Training Cert  Field 01 - Agriculture and Nature Conservation  Forestry and Wood Technology 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  120  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Passed the End Date -
Status was "Reregistered" 
SAQA 0695/12  2012-07-01  2015-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2016-06-30   2019-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

The general management and maintenance of forests is an important part of ensuring the sustainability of the industry and the environment. A number of established methods are available to achieve these goals.

There is a need for technical and general operational management to achieve established forestry goals and priorities. Generic management skills and technical operational forestry skills jointly enable the reaching of identified forestry priorities and objectives.

The need to achieve greater balance is often a product of the interplay between the various stakeholders under the guidance of forestry professionals. This may necessitate the participation of the local community in forestry initiatives undertaken in their area or within the community's immediate environment.

This Qualification provides the qualifying learner with the skills required to:
  • Use numeric skills in forestry operations.
  • Advise and inform role players about the regulatory requirements impacting on forestry operations for compliance.
  • Manage technical forestry operations in own area of specialisation.
  • Apply operational management skills to forestry operation(s).
  • Design and execute community development initiatives.

    Range: Small scale contractor/small business owner, the Forest Foreman, the Assistant Forester and Community engagement officer.

    This qualification will allow the learner to acquire and develop the following competencies:
  • Describe and apply the core functions in the forestry environment.
  • Apply the budget function in a business unit.
  • Explain Human Resource policies and procedures.
  • Apply safety, health and environment protection procedures.
  • Conduct basic map reading.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the principles of Silviculture and Fire Protection.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the principles of Forest Engineering practices.

    Rationale:

    Role players within the Forest Industry Stakeholders/organisation:

    Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF), Forestry Structure Council (FSC), Forestry South Africa (FSA), House of traditional leadership, South African Forestry Contractors Association (SAFCA), World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), Forest Industries Training Providers Association.

    There is currently a need for a Qualification in the area of forestry at the lower levels, from and between the level of Ground Worker and the First Line Manager or Supervisor. This range also includes the small scale forestry operator who runs a small business. The need that necessitates the construction of this Qualification is generally that of managing a small scale forestry operation through operational management skills and the application of related technical forestry skills.

    Those standing to benefit from the Qualification are operators of forestry SMME's and previously disadvantaged persons who are currently in the field, as employees. The list of beneficiaries also includes Previously Disadvantaged Individual) PDI 's, and other persons with the requisite job experience who may want to exercise the option of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).

    Accordingly, the objectives of increased access to learning opportunities are reached and the capacity to deal with forestry and related environment challenges is increased.

    Transformational areas and beneficiaries:

    This qualification will benefit Department of Water Affairs and Forestry, (DWAF), WAF, FSC, FSA, House traditional leadership, South African Forestry Contractors Association (SAFCA), World Wildlife Foundation, Forest Industries Training Providers Association.

    Target Learners:

    Learners who are currently working in the industry and new entrants who aspire to pursue a career in Forestry.

    Other groups of people to benefit from this qualification will include rural communities which are located adjacent to forestry operations.
    Emerging contractors also stand a chance to benefit from this qualification as it will professionalize their entrepreneurial initiatives.

    NQF Principles:

    In keeping with NQF principles, this qualification seeks to create increased learning opportunities for persons and communities in outlying areas in and around forestry plantations. In the same way, it enables the formalization of prior learning in forestry learning areas. This ensures that principles of access and redress are actualized. The other principles of portability and so on, are actualised through the articulation of this qualification. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    This qualification assumes that the candidate has already achieved the following:
  • ID 50266: National Certificate: Forestry: Silviculture at NQF Level 3.
  • ID 48988: National Certificate: Timber Harvesting at NQF Level 3.
  • An equivalent set of experience at entry.

    Access to the Qualification:
  • Access to this Qualification is open.

    Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL):

    This Qualification can be achieved wholly or in part through Recognition of Prior Learning. Whether a learner attends formal courses or acquires the required skills through informal means, the same standards apply as per the matrix of unit standards and Exit Level Outcomes.

    The Qualification and the Unit Standards have been written in such a way that the learning has to be assessed in an integrated way. Assessors will assess evidence to establish what the learners know, understand and can do. Such evidence may be gathered through course related activities and/or through work related activities. In cases where candidates do not attend formal learning programs, assessors should seek work related evidence as far as possible.

    Assessors should ensure that learners submitting themselves to RPL are thoroughly briefed prior to assessment. Learners will be required to submit a Portfolio of Evidence in the prescribed format to be assessed for formal recognition.

    Where courses are provided for learners, institutions can use the Unit Standards and this Qualification to assess learning achievements. For learners who are not able to achieve the outcomes, providers can then use the Unit Standards and Qualification to determine a specific learning program to suit the learning needs of the candidate. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    Fundamental Component:

    All fundamental unit standards are compulsory (56 credits).

    The fundamental Component consists of the following, which is compulsory for all learners:
  • Unit standards at NQF Level 4, totalling 16 credits in Mathematical Literacy.
  • Unit standards at NQF Level 4, totalling 20 credits in Communication in a First South African Language.
  • Unit standards at NQF Level 3, totalling 20 credits in Communication in a Second South African Language.

    It is therefore compulsory for learners to do Communication in two different South African Languages, one at NQF Level 4 and the other at NQF Level 3.

    Core Component:

    All core unit standards are compulsory (34 credits).

    Elective Component:

    There are five elective pathways, Forest Engineering Management, Silviculture Management, Small Business Management, Community engagement Officer and Safety, Health and Environment Officer.

    Specialisation path 1: Forest Engineering Management with unit standards titles below with 19 credits:
  • Apply knowledge of manual and mechanized harvesting and transport systems.
  • Supervise aerial extraction systems.
  • Supervise maintenance of forest roads.
  • Cost harvesting and transport operations.
  • Prepare an operational harvest plan.

    Specialisation path 2: Silviculture Management with unit standards titles below with 27 credits:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Silviculture in commercial forestry.
  • Cost Silviculture operations.
  • Prepare an operational Silviculture plan.
  • Specialisation path 3: Social and Community Forestry with unit standards titles below with 23 credits:
  • Conduct basic community needs.
  • Develop networks for development practice.
  • Identify and facilitate the implementation of a community forest project.

    Specialisation path 4: Business and Human Resources Management with unit standards titles below with 23 credits:
  • Finance a new venture.
  • Manage finances of a new venture.
  • Produce business plans for a new venture.
  • Tender to secure business for a new venture.

    Specialisation path 5: Environment, Health and Safety with unit standards titles below with 27 credits:
  • Explain and apply environmental legal principles, rights, duties and responsibilities to a specific work context.
  • Apply safety, health and environment protection procedures.
  • Perform administrative functions during wildfire suppression.
  • Manage a crew during wildfire suppression.
  • Lead a strike attack force to contain or extinguish a wildfire.

    General Electives with unit standards titles below with 30 credits:
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS in a workplace and its effect on a business sub-sector, own organisation and a specific workplace.
  • Participate in a group to recommend solutions to problems.
  • Negotiate an agreement in an authentic work solution.
  • Supervise work unit to achieve objectives (individuals and teams).
  • Apply routine maintenance and servicing plans and procedures.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of nursery practices including seedling quality.

    Note: Each of the specialization areas has a different number of credits. The minimum number of elective credits is 30. Therefore the balance of credits required to achieve this qualification must be selected from any of the other elective pathways. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Use numeric skills in forestry operations.

    2. Advise and inform relevant parties and or subordinates about the regulatory codes governing and or impacting on forestry operations for compliance.
    >Range: Colleagues, subordinates, the local community.

    3. Manage technical forestry operations in own area of specialisation.
    > Range: The qualifying learner should be able to know, understand and apply the theory and practical applications of own area of specialisation and its impact on role players and their area of operation.

    4. Apply operational management skills to forestry operation(s).

    5. Conduct community development and liaison in relation to forestry.
    > Range: The qualifying learner should be able to know, understand and apply the theory and practical requirements of the impact of forestry on the local community, in terms of socio-economic and ecological development and sustainability.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    Critical Cross-field outcomes have been addressed by the Exit Level Outcomes, as follows:

    Identify and solve problems:

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Identify and classify forests.
  • Conduct risk assessment.
  • Community development needs.

    Work effectively with others as a member of a team or organisation.

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Contribute to team and operational goals.
  • Adhere to operational procedures.
  • Support team members in adhering to procedures and work roles to be carried out.
  • Adhere to team and organisational protocols.

    Organise and manage oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively.

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Respond appropriately to risk and hazards.
  • Apply work procedures appropriately to meet work requirement.

    Collect, analyse, organise and critically evaluate information.

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Conduct risk assessment.
  • Respond appropriately to risks identified.
  • Apply legal and environmental standards.
  • Choice and use of equipment (chain saw and protective clothing).

    Communicate effectively by using mathematical and language skills in the modes of oral and written presentations.

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Report injures.
  • Brief ground crew.
  • Communicate with role players.

    Use science and technology effectively and critically, showing responsibility towards the environment and health of others.

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Apply occupational health, safety and environmental requirements in the workplace.
  • Adhere to sector standards.
  • Use and care for equipment properly.

    Demonstrate an understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognizing that problem solving contexts do not exist in isolation.

    This will be achieved when qualifying learners:
  • Provide appropriate solutions to forestry needs identified.
  • Conduct risk assessment.
  • Apply occupational health, safety and environmental requirements in the workplace.
  • Assist team members. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1.

    Financial projections, budgets, business ratio analyses and numeric applications specific to forestry business operations are:

    1.1 Explained in relation to forestry operations.
    1.2 Undertaken correctly in relation to forestry operations.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2.

    2.1 Relevant parties are advised and informed about the regulatory requirements governing and or impacting on forestry operations for compliance
    Range:
  • Occupational Health and Safety Act.
  • Relevant forestry legislation.
  • Relevant forestry legislation.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3.

    The following technical standards are explained or demonstrated in relation to forestry operations:

    3.1 Technical operational objectives.
    3.2 Technical operational procedures.
    3.3 Technical applications.
    3.4 Sector norms and standards.
    3.5 Operational requirements.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4.

    4.1 Operational plans for forestry operations are developed and executed.
    4.2 Human Resource for forestry operations are developed and executed.
    4.3 Monitoring and review plans for forestry operations are developed and executed.
    4.4 Operational documentation for forestry operations is developed and executed.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5.

    Design and execution of community development initiatives, are in line with:

    5.1 Forestry project objectives.
    5.2 Organisational standards.
    5.3 Sector specific guidelines.

    Integrated Assessment:

    Integrated assessment evaluates the learner's ability to combine actions and ideas across a range of activities and knowledge areas. The integrated assessment must specifically assess the learner's ability to:
  • Demonstrate competence by means of the practical application of the embedded knowledge in a manner that meets the required performance standards required.
  • Illustrate a clear understanding of the concepts, theory and principles that underpin the practical action taken.

    The assessment will require assessment methods which measure and evaluate evidence generated during learning and on-the-job activities. Because assessment practices must be open and transparent, fair, valid and reliable; ensuring that no leaner is disadvantaged in any way whatsoever, an integrated assessment approach is incorporated into the Qualification.

    A variety of methods must be used in assessment tools and activities must be appropriate to the context in which the learner is working or will work. Where it is not possible to assess the learner at the workplace, simulations, case studies role plays and other similar techniques should be used to provide a context appropriate to the assessment.

    The term integrated assessment implies that theoretical and practical components should be assessed together. Whenever possible, the assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values shown in the Unit Standards should be integrated and, during integrated assessment, the assessor should make use of a range of formative and summative assessment tools and methods. Combinations of practical, applied, foundational and reflective competencies should be assessed. Assessment should further ensure that all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross field outcomes are evaluated in an integrated way.

    Assessors must assess and give credit for the evidence of learning that has already been acquired through formal, informal and non-formal learning and work experience as the assessment process is capable of being applied to RPL, subject to the rules and criteria of the relevant ETQA. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    United Kingdom:

    In conducting the international comparability for this qualification, three countries, namely New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Canada were selected. The two countries were selected for the ease with which their qualifications could be compared to their South African equivalents, on a like-on-like basis. Canada, with its expansive forests, as well as its expertise in the field was also selected.

    National Qualifications:

    Forestry Level 2

    In the UK, all vocational qualifications fall under the qualifications, National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) and Scottish Vocational Qualifications (SVQs). The qualification under review in South Africa, is comparable to the following:

    Forestry NVQ/SVQ Level 2 with two streams: Forestry: planning new forest plantation and Harvesting: planning, felling, delimbing, extraction, log making, fleeting, loading and finally transportation to log yards for further processing).

    Arboriculture Level 2, and Tree Work Level 3:
  • Arboriculture NVQ/SVQ Level 2.
  • Tree work NVQ/SVQ Level 3.

    Mandatory units:
  • Maintain activities to meet requirements (Management Standards).
  • Unit B1 Support the efficient use of resources (Management Standards).
  • Unit C5 Develop productive working relationships (Management Standards).
  • Unit CU3 Promote, monitor and maintain health, safety and security.

    The following learning unit could be compared to the South African forestry costing equivalent:

    Unit CU96 Develop, negotiate and agree proposals to offer.

    New Zealand

    This country probably has the widest range of qualifications in forestry in the Level 2-4 Band that can be directly compared to the same South African range. The forestry Training Guide is a useful tool that comprises the following wide range of qualifications:

    National Certificate Programmes:
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Foundation Skills) 6, Level 2, Credits 60.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Establishment and Silviculture) 9, Level 3, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Forest Establishment) 13, Level 4, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Mechanical Land Preparation) 17, Level 4, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Silvicultural Pruning) 20, Level 4, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Silvicultural Thinning) 23, Level 4, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Harvesting) 26, Level 3, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Tree Felling) 28, Level 4, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Ground Based Harvesting - Extraction) 31, Level 4, Credits 120.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Mechanised Harvesting) 34, Level 4, Credits 120.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Cable Harvesting - Extraction) 37, Level 4, Credits 120.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Log Making) 40, Level 4, Credits 90.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Log Scaling) 43, Level 4, Credits 60.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Log Loading) 46, Level 4, Credits 90.

    Contents:
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Mensuration) 49, Level 4, Credits 60.
  • National Certificate in Forestry (Operations Management) 52, Level 4, Credits 90.

    General Code of practice for forestry players:

    The Code of Practice is a tool for people involved in forest management. It has been developed by the New Zealand Forestry Association and endorsed by other major industry organizations. The aim to help forest managers, contractors and their staff take into account the many factors which influence forest management and operations. The Code is based around 18 Best Environmental Management Practices (BEPs) which are structured as practical decision-making and audit tools.

    Code of practice for health and safety in the field of forestry:

    A statement of statutory requirements, rules and provisions, based on preferred work practices and arrangements, for the purpose of ensuring the health and safety of persons to which this code applies and persons who may be affected by the code. The code is supported by guidelines containing safety, health, training and operational information and outlining preferred work practices or arrangements on the major components related to each part. This will be practical information for those carrying out or directly associated with the work.

    Canada

    There is only one post secondary school in Canada that specialises in General Forestry. Most of the training and educational course work in Canada that could be said to compare with the South African equivalent is at University undergraduate level. There are also a number of post High School Courses that have the status of Continuing Education or professional short courses at the various Universities.

    The following is a sample of comparable undergraduate programs at the University of Brunswick:

    Core Course:

    Introduction to Forestry FOR 10014 ch (3C 3L):

    This course provides students with an overview of field forestry skills through collection and analysis of basic stand-level inventory data. Emphasis is on developing basic mensuration and computation skills through a series of laboratory exercises and practical problems. Students learn how to quantify stand structure and to use basic quantitative information to make forestry decisions.

    Forest Dynamics and Management 4 ch (3C 3L):

    For 2006: Focuses on modelling forests and examining the nature of their change with and without intervention. Introduces a decision-making process to manage change in forests.

    For 2014 Structure and Development of Woody Plants 3 ch (2C 3L):

    Development of woody-plant structure from embryo to maturity. Topics include morphogenesis and basic anatomy, development of crown architecture, interrelationships between crown and stem development, wood and elements of wood quality, mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproduction. For each topic, differences among major genera will be considered. Prerequisite: FOR 2425.

    FOR 2425 Autecology of Forest Vegetation 4 ch (3C 3L) Recognition and identification of species, environmental requirements, and persistence mechanisms of various life-forms of forest vegetation; interpretation of silvical characteristics of tree species; analysis of stands of trees in relation to general site conditions and relative stage of development; and evaluation of interrelationships among components of forest vegetation over time, including likely responses to perturbation or to interventions of various kinds.Prerequisite: A basic university course in Biology or Botany, Co-requisite: FOR 2435.

    FOR 2432 Forest Inventory and Growth 4 ch (3C 3L):

    This course focuses on the design and analysis of forest-level inventories. Concepts of stratification and multistage sampling are presented. Approaches to modelling and predicting stand growth and inventory updates are explored.

    FOR 2505 Soils for Plant Growth 3 ch (2C 3L):

    Students examine relationships between soils and plants, and related roles of water and nutrients. Factors that restrict root growth, and processes that influence soil development are revealed through field exercises and laboratory work. Effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on forest soils and subsequent plant responses are emphasized.

    FOR 3005 Silviculture and Stand Intervention Design 5 ch (3C 6L) Takes a design-based approach to Silviculture. Students develop stand intervention plans for the main stages of stand development integrating the biology of growing trees, engineering of conducting operations, and economics of costing operations.

    FOR 3006 Forest Management 4 ch (3C 6L) Continuation of FOR 3005. Introduction to linear programming in forest management. Introduction to elements of resource modelling and productivity assessment (e.g. water flow) at the stand level. Analysis of the impact of alternative interventions at the operational level and their integration with strategic and tactical plans, including: financial and socioeconomic evaluation of forest management and resulting value flows; and risk management for insect or pathogenic attacks and wildfire. Post-implementation assessment of activities as a critical part of the management process. Prerequisite: FOR 2006, FOR 3005, or permission of instructor.

    FOR 3445 Forest Ecology: Populations and Communities 4 ch (3C 3L) To understand and link processes acting on individuals, populations, and communities in space and time. To predict the response of individuals, populations, and communities to disturbance and to understand the implications of such responses for management of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Prerequisite: FOR 2420, 2505.

    FOR 3456 Forest Watershed and Forest Fire Management 3 ch (2C 3L) Emphasizes the principles of management of watersheds and fire at the stand and landscape level. Influences of climate, topography/terrain, and stand and fuel types are covered. Concepts of watershed conservation are introduced as well as principles and models dealing with water retention and flow, and carbon and nutrient cycling in primary forest watersheds. Fire management concepts deal with the Fire Weather Index system, the Fire Behaviour Prediction system, fire ecology, and fire management strategies, tactics and operations. Prerequisites: FOR3445 or permission of instructor.

    FOR 4020 Management Practicum 8 ch (1C 3L):

    Practical exercise in forest landscape management, designed to provide an opportunity to integrate skills and knowledge gained throughout the program. Forest Ecosystem Management and Forest Engineering students will work on the same project to design landscape management plans at the strategic, tactical and operational levels. The practicum will be based on real forests. Through consultation with clients and/or members of the public, goals will be developed. Plans will be derived to integrate these goals. Teams will be responsible for project management, including planning, budgeting and report preparation.

    FOR 4096 Forest Landscape Design and Management 5 ch (3C 3L Integrates value-flow planning with landscape planning by: 1) introducing students to the concepts and techniques used in dealing with the spatial dimensions in forest management planning; 2) introducing students to the difficulties involved with management for a complex set of demands, where resources demanded have production functions that include complex spatial and temporal relationships of inputs, many of which are unknown, and 3) exposing students to techniques available to forecast landscape patterns resulting from flow driven management planning, and to design landscape patterns based on analysis of natural dynamics. Prerequisite: FOR 3006, or permission of instructor.

    FOR 4625 Integrated Management of Insects and Fungi 4 ch (3C 3L).

    FOR 4992 Individual Project I 3ch.

    Elective Courses:

    FOR 2265 Computer Programming for Forestry 3 ch.
    FOR 2286 GIS IN FORESTRY II 3 ch (3L).
    FOR 2933 Bioethics in Forestry 2 ch 3 ch (3C).
    FOR 2946 Bioethics, Emotional Intelligence, and the Nature of Spirituality 3 ch (3C).
    FOR 3853 Problem-Solving and Interpersonal Communication 3 ch (3C/S) Designed to help develop skills in solving problems and communicating with others. Models will be presented and used. Emphasizes student participation and leadership.

    FOR 4013 Basic Woodlot Management 3 ch (3C).

    Introduction to basic woodlot management, covering such topics as planning, harvesting, Silviculture, Christmas trees, maple products, wildlife and recreation, economics, owner characteristics and organization, government programs and policies and industry relations as they relate to small woodlots. Prerequisite: Open to 4th- and 5th-year Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management students, or permission of instructor.

    Conclusion

    This brief comparative survey stretches from the certificate study level of forestry to undergraduate levels, at university. The reason is that there appears, in many countries, to be a limited number of learning programs in "pure" forestry outside the universities and Higher Education.

    Despite this, as explained, the forestry learning infrastructure in New Zealand is wide, all-encompassing and very instructional as an example to be followed.

    Similarities: Broadly speaking the topics are similar on key or core components of study, as demonstrated by the topics and the learning areas and or subjects covered. There are subjects in the countries under review that resemble South Africa's Critical Cross Field Outcomes (CCFO's). Examples are problems solving, as well as other subjects in the filed of life skills like Emotional Intelligence (IQ).

    Differences:

    In many countries, the subject of forestry is studied at Higher Education Level. In addition, the advanced nature of countries in the developed world is shown by the inclusion for study of subjects like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for easy spatial location in the forest. The subject of Bio-ethics is included to strengthen the case for an integrated view of the universe. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This Qualification articulates both horizontally and vertically.

    Horizontal articulation:
  • Further Education and training Certificate: New Venture Creation (SMME), NQF Level 4.

    Vertical articulation:
  • ID 17499: National Certificate: Forestry, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 17496: National Diploma: Forestry, NQF Level 5.
  • ID 19248: National Certificate in Forestry, NQF Level 5.
  • 2069: National Higher Certificate: Forestry, NQF Level 5. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Anyone assessing a learner or moderating the assessment of a learner against the qualification must be registered as an assessor with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, Assurance (ETQA) Body, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement of this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant Education, Training, Quality, Assurance (ETQA) Body, or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessment and moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant Education, Training, Quality, Assurance (ETQA) Body, or by an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA, according to the ETQA`s policies and guidelines for assessment and moderation.
  • Moderation must include both internal and external moderation of assessments, unless ETQA policies specify otherwise. Moderation should also encompass achievement of the competence described in the associated unit standards.
  • Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed by any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA. 

  • CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Criteria for registration of assessors:

    Anyone assessing a learner against this qualification must be registered with the relevant ETQA as an assessor.

    Any institution offering learning that will enable the achievement this qualification must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA. Assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA according to the policies and guidelines for assessment of that ETQA, in terms of agreements reached around assessment and between various ETQA's (including professional bodies).

    Anyone wishing to be assessed against this qualification may apply to be assessed any assessment agency, assessor or provider institution that is accredited by the relevant ETQA.

    The options as listed above provide the opportunity to ensure that assessment and moderation can be transparent, affordable, valid reliable and non-discriminatory.

    For an applicant to register as an assessor or moderator of this qualification, the applicant needs:
  • To be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA.
  • To be in possession of the relevant qualification.
  • To have sufficient relevant experience.
  • To have the appropriate qualification to assess Communication and Mathematical Literacy. 

  • REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this qualification was Reregistered in 2012. 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  13223  Apply safety, health and environmental protection procedures  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  117085  Conduct basic forestry map reading  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Core  263815  Demonstrate understanding of the principles of Forest Engineering practices  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  263760  Demonstrate understanding of the principles of Silviculture and fire protection  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Core  14667  Describe and apply the management functions of an organization  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
    Core  242810  Manage Expenditure against a budget  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119472  Accommodate audience and context needs in oral/signed communication  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119458  Analyse and respond to a variety of literary texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119466  Interpret a variety of literary texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  119457  Interpret and use information from texts  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Fundamental  9015  Apply knowledge of statistics and probability to critically interrogate and effectively communicate findings on life related problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119470  Evaluate literary texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119469  Read/view, analyse and respond to a variety of texts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  9016  Represent analyse and calculate shape and motion in 2-and 3-dimensional space in different contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119471  Use language and communication in occupational learning programmes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  7468  Use mathematics to investigate and monitor the financial aspects of personal, business, national and international issues  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Fundamental  119459  Write/present/sign for a wide range of contexts  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  116275  Apply routine maintenance and servicing plans and procedures  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  13915  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS in a workplace, and its effects on a business sub-sector, own organisation and a specific workplace  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  119515  Develop networks for development practice  Level 3  NQF Level 03 
    Elective  263819  Apply knowledge of manual and mechanized harvesting and transport systems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  110053  Conduct a basic community needs assessment  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  263816  Cost harvesting and transport operations  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  263817  Cost Silviculture operations  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  263840  Demonstrate knowledge of nursery practices including seedling  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123240  Demonstrate knowledge of silviculture in commercial forestry  Level 4  NQF Level 04  20 
    Elective  115591  Explain and apply environmental legal principles, rights, duties and responsibilities to a specific work context  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114584  Finance a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  263836  Identify possible community initiatives  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123232  Lead a strike attack force to contain or extinguish a wildfire  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123231  Manage a crew during wildfire suppression  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114586  Manage finances of a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  13948  Negotiate an agreement or deal in an authentic work situation  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  14920  Participate in groups and/or teams to recommend solutions to problems  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  123230  Perform administrative functions during wildfire suppression  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  117070  Prepare an operational harvest plan  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  263838  Prepare an operational Silviculture plan  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114592  Produce business plans for a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  263834  Supervise aerial extraction systems and fire protection  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  263835  Supervise maintenance of forest roads  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  10981  Supervise work unit to achieve work unit objectives (individuals and teams)  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  114593  Tender to secure business for a new venture  Level 4  NQF Level 04 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. CMO Logistics Pty Ltd 
    2. Legal Environment Safety & Health Requirements cc 
    3. Longata Consultant 
    4. VEB CELE & Associates (Pty) Ltd 
    5. VPK BUSINESS VENTURE C C 



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